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1888

Embudo, New Mexico Stream Gauging Station
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1888EmbudoState: NMZip: 87531Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/embudo,-new-mexico-stream-guaging-station/Creator: Powell, John Wesley

A tiny village on the Rio Grande River in northern New Mexico became the training center for the first American hydrographers and provided the first stream-gauging operations of the U.S. Geological Survey. To plan any water system, it is necessary to know the amount of water flowing in the stream or river at all times - including low, normal, and flood conditions. 

YearAdded:
1973
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Chris English (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Near Velarde, NM: U.S. Geological Survey Rio Grande Embudo Gaging Station, 2011Era_date_from: 1888
Poughkeepsie-Highland Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1888Hudson RiverPoughkeepsieState: NYZip: 12528Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/People-and-Projects/Projects/Landmarks/Poughkeepsie-Highland-Bridge/, http://www.asce.org/Project/Poughkeepsie-Highland-Bridge/Creator: Clarke, Thomas , Macdonald, Charles

A bridge across the Hudson at or near Poughkeepsie was planned starting in the early 1870s to primarily carry coal from the coalfields of northeastern Pennsylvania to New England. At the time there were no bridges between Albany and New York Harbor. Horatio Allen, soon to be President of the ASCE, was its first Chief Engineer. He designed a multiple span suspension bridge. Later the American Bridge Company started construction on a five span bridge but went bankrupt before it completed the first pier foundations.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/bobistraveling (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Poughkeepsie-Highland BridgeEra_date_from: 1888
Milwaukee River Flushing Station
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Solid WasteEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1888 RiverMilwaukeeState: WICountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/solid-waste/-166-milwaukee-river-flushing-station-%281888%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/759894e1-2be9-4a23-942b-2d2c272336a5/166-Milwaukee-River-Flushing-Station-1888.aspxCreator: Reynolds, Edwin, Edward P. Allis Company

This pump, designed by Edwin Reynolds (1831-1909) and built by the Edward P. Allis company, is the major component of one of the earliest water-pollution control systems. It was capable of pumping more than a half billion gallons of water a day, the highest-capacity pump in the world when installed. It still is used during the summer to pump water from Lake Michigan into the Milwaukee River upstream of the downtown area. This maintains a current in the lower portion of the river and greatly reduces the concentration of pollutants.

YearAdded:
1992
Image Caption: Milwaukee River Flushing StationEra_date_from: 1888
Sweetwater Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1888Sweetwater RiverChula VistaState: CACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Sweetwater-Dam/Creator: Brown, Frank , Schuyler, James

When completed in 1888 to a height of 90 feet, Sweetwater Dam was once the tallest masonry arch dam in the United States, and it led to many others of the same basic design. The original construction began in November 1886 under the direction of Frank E. Brown (civil engineer for Bear Valley Dam) with the rubble-masonry thin-arch design being 50 feet in height. Subsequently, the owner of the water system called upon civil engineer James D. Schuyler to continue and complete the project. Although the field of hydrology was very new and not fully understood at the time, Mr.

YearAdded:
2005
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Phil Konstantin (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Sweetwater DamEra_date_from: 1888
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: EducationEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1888Georgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaState: GAZip: 30332Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/education/-213-george-w--woodruff-school-of-mechanical-enginCreator: Coon, John Saylor
Between its opening in 1888 and the mid-1920s, Georgia Tech took a leading role in transforming mechanical engineering education from a shop-based, vocational program to a professional one built on rigorous academic and analytical methods. Led by John Saylor Coon (1854-1938), a founding member of ASME, this curriculum merged theoretical understanding with practical experience. By bringing Coon on board so soon after the school's founding, Tech began this transition almost from day one, even though it took three decades to completely effect it.
YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Public Domain (Copyright Expired)Image Caption: On Left: Georgia Tech's shop building
On Right: Tech Tower
Photo circa 1899
Era_date_from: 1888
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