Skip to main content

1904

Holt Track-Type Tractor
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: VehiclesEra: 1900sDateCreated: 1904Haggin MuseumaStocktonState: CAZip: 95203Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/holt-tractor-16.aspxCreator: Holt, Benjamin
YearAdded:
1982
Image Credit: Public domainImage Caption: The second prototype of a track-type tractor built by the Holt Machinery Company of Stockton, California in 1905.
Huffman Prairie
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1900sDateCreated: 1904Pylon RdDaytonState: OHCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/SecondaryTwoColumn.aspx?id=15169

On this 84-acre meadow in 1904 and 1905, the Wright Brothers successfully mastered the mechanics of controlled, powered, heavier-than-air flight. The brothers also built the world’s first airport here, and in 1910 the Wright Company School of Aviation established a flying school on the site and trained many of the world’s first pilots, including some of the first military pilots, such as Thomas DeWitt Milling.

Image Credit: public domainImage Caption: Orville Wright in flight above Huffman Prairie, covering a distance of approximately 1,760 feet in 40 1/5 seconds, Nov. 16, 1904
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalSub Category: CommunicationsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1904General Electic CompanySchenectadyState: NYZip: 12306Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Alexanderson_Radio_Alternator,_1904Creator: Alexanderson, Ernst
"The Alexanderson radio alternator was a high-power, radio-frequency source which provided reliable transoceanic radiotelegraph communication during and after World War I. Ernst F.W. Alexanderson (1878-1975), a General Electric engineer, designed radio alternators with a frequency range to 100 kHz and a power capability from 2 kW to 200 kW.
YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Alexanderson Radio AlternatorEra_date_from: 1904
Peterborough Hydraulic (Canal) Lift Lock
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1904353 Hunter St EastPeterboroughState: ONCountry: CanadaWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/205-peterborough-hydraulic-canal-lift-lockCreator: Rogers, Richard Birdsall , Dominion Bridge Company

Opened July 9, 1904, this lift lock is the highest of its type in the world, transferring boats between two water levels in a single 19.8 m (65 ft.) lift. Designed in place of conventional locks, which would have lengthed the time considerably to transverse a gradual drop, this lift lock was a unique solution made feasible. It operates on a balance principle. Each boat chamber is supported by a ram, 2.28 m (7.5 ft.) In diameter. These move up and down inside water-filled cylinders connected by a pipe.

YearAdded:
1999
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Mac Armstrong (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Peterborough Hydraulic Canal Lift LockEra_date_from: 1904
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1904The Transit MuseumBrooklynState: NYZip: 11201Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/rail-transportation---1/-31-interborough-rapid-trasit-system-%28original-linCreator: Belmont, August
Plans to build a rapid transit system in New York were first made in 1831. By 1868 the first elevated railway was erected. As the "El" became crowded, construction of an underground railway was proposed. Ground was broken on March 24, 1900. The original subway, which took opened October 27, 1904, ran 9.1 miles from City Hall to 145th Street and Broadway. The fare was a nickel. Extensions to the Bronx opened in 1905 and to Brooklyn in 1908, completing the first subway.
YearAdded:
1978
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Adam E. Moreira (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Interborough Rapid Trasit System Original LineEra_date_from: 1904
Subscribe to 1904
Stay informed - subscribe to our newsletter.
The subscriber's email address.