Skip to main content

Aircraft

Pegasus 3 Engine BS 916
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1993Rolls Royce PLC
BristolState: BCZip: BS34 7QECountry: UKWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/--168-pegasus-3-engine-bs-916-%281960%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/f2e04cf6-f24f-4633-bb2f-ef61c5deb500/168-Pegasus-3-Engine-BS-916.aspxCreator: Bristol Aero-Engines Ltd. (now part of Rolls-Royce), Hooker, Stanley

The Pegasus 3 is the earliest surviving example of the prototype engine for vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) jets, namely the Royal Air Force's Harriers and US Marine Corps' AV-8Bs. Owned by the Rolls- Royce Heritage Trust (a company-sponsored history and preservation society), the artifact is an early developmental model of the Pegasus 3 engine, the first to fly with sufficient thrust to prove the vectored-thrust concept for V/STOL jet aircraft, in 1960.

YearAdded:
1993
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: The earliest surviving example of the prototype engine for vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) jets, namely Harriers and AV-8Bs.Era_date_from: 1993
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1955Arnold Air Force BaseArnold AFBState: TNZip: 37389Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-140-arnold-afb-wind-tunnel-%281955%29Creator: Sverdrup, Lief
This propulsion wind tunnel (PWT) at Arnold AFB was the first large-scale facility for testing jet and rocket engines in simulated high-speed flight conditions. It has a unique combination of transonic (1955) and supersonic (1960) wind tunnels using a common 236,000 horsepower drive, the world's largest when built. It can achieve air speeds up to Mach 4.75 at altitudes up to 150,000 feet in its 16-foot square, removable test sections. Design engineers were Lief J. Sverdrup, John R. Parcel, Brice Smith, and Walter Cook, of Sverdrup and Parcel, St.
YearAdded:
1989
Image Credit: Public Domain (US Air Force)Image Caption: The world's first large-scale testing facility for jet and rocket engines in simulated high-speed flight conditionsEra_date_from: 1955
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1954Steven F. Udvar-Hazy CenterChantillyState: VAZip: 20151Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-178-boeing-367-80-%281954%29-, http://files.asme.org/asmeorg/Communities/History/Landmarks/5506.pdfCreator: Boeing
The 367-80 is the prototype for most jet transports. Its success was due largely to its mechanical systems, including turbine engines with thrust reversers and noise suppressors, redundant hydraulic control systems, and an improved cabin-pressurization system. Honeycomb flap panels were introduced, along with a strong, lightweight structural design that controlled fatigue cracking. These led to several innovations in aircraft tooling and manufacturing techniques. The Dash-80 was the first commercial airliner economical enough to take the US airline industry off subsidy.
YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Boeing Dreamscape (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Prototype of the Boeing 707 and most jet transport systems, the Boeing 367-80 established economic feasibility of commercial air travel.Era_date_from: 1954
Hydromatic Propeller
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1938New England Air Museum
Bradley Intl. Airport
Windsor LocksState: CTZip: 06096Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-149-hydromatic-propeller-%28ca--1938%29, http://files.asme.org/ASMEORG/Communities/History/Landmarks/5572.pdfCreator: Hamilton Standard

Rapid development of aircraft design in the 1930s required many related innovations, including propeller design. The hydromatic propeller by Hamilton Standard marked a significant advance over the counterweight-type, controllable pitch propeller. The first test flight of the prototype took place in 1938: the public demonstration was made by a United Air Lines DC-3 over New York City on April 6, 1938. It played a distinguished role in allied combat aircraft in World War II.

YearAdded:
1990
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: An early example of propeller innovations, including variable-pitch control and feathering capability.Era_date_from: 1938
Link C-3 Flight Trainer
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1935Roberson Museum and Science Center

BinghamtonState: NYZip: 13905Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/210-link-c-3-flight-trainerCreator: Link, Edwin

During the 1920s, Edwin A. Link was employed in his father's organ building and repair business. He obtained his pilot's license in 1927 and became convinced that a mechanical device could be built as an inexpensive method to teach basic piloting. Link received three patents on his flight trainer (No. 1,825,462, March 12, 1930; No. 2,244,464, June 3, 1941; and No. 2,358,016, Sept. 12, 1944).

YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Tony SpeerImage Caption: An early flight simulator representative of the first truly effective mechanical device used to simulate actual flight processes.Era_date_from: 1935
McKinley Climatic Laboratory
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Research and DevelopmentEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 194446th Test WingEglin AFBState: FLZip: 32542Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/research-and-development/-116-mckinley-climatic-laboratory-%281944%29Creator: McKinley, Ashley, U.S. Army Air Force

Designed and constructed in the early 1940s, this laboratory has an unequalled capacity to simulate a wide range of climatic conditions from arctic cold to jungle moisture. Data from tests of some three hundred different aircraft and over two thousand items of equipment has provided information vital to the performance, safety, and reliability of aircraft operating in extremes of weather.

YearAdded:
1987
Image Credit: Public Domain (United States Air Force)Image Caption: McKinley Climatic LaboratoryEra_date_from: 1944
Eglin Air Force Base
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1935Northwest Florida Regional Airport (VPS)ValparaisoState: FLZip: 32580Country: USAWebsite: https://info.aiaa.org/AIAANews/Lists/AIAA%20News/DispForm.aspx?ID=76Creator: U.S. Army Air Corps

Established in 1935 as the Valparaiso Bombing and Gunnery Base, the base supported the U.S. Army Air Corps, the predecessor to the U.S. Air Force, as its primary facility for training new pilots in bombing and gunnery tactics. It also served as a test facility for aircraft, aircraft armament, air-delivered munitions and other aircraft systems. The base was renamed Eglin Field in 1937 in honor of Air Corps aviator Lt. Col. Frederick I. Eglin, who trained pilots during World War I, and who had recently died in an aircraft accident. After Congress created the U.S.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Eglin Air Force BaseEra_date_from: 1935
ALCOA 50,000-ton Hydraulic Forging Press
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1954Aluminum Company of AmericaClevelandState: OHZip: 44105Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/71-alcoa-50000-ton-hydraulic-forging-pressCreator: Mesta Machine Company

This 50,000-ton die-forging press is among the largest fabrication tools in the world. It was designed and built for the U.S. Air Force by the Mesta Machine Company of Pittsburgh, following the discovery of a 30,000-ton press used by the Germans in World War II (later acquired by the Soviet Union). By 1950, a Heavy Press Program was organized to establish a self-sustaining industrial base for a press capable of producing large forgings and extrusions for the United States. The 50,000-ton Mesta press was one of the first built under this program between 1952 and 1955.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Caption: The true enormity of the ALCOA 50,000-ton Hydraulic Forging Press can be fully appreciated when put into comparison of the average-sized person (lower right and on the platform).Era_date_from: 1954
Subscribe to Aircraft
Stay informed - subscribe to our newsletter.
The subscriber's email address.