Skip to main content

Pumping Station

McNeill Street Pumping Station
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1887 Water Works MuseumShreveportState: LAZip: 71101Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/McNeill-Street-Pumping-Station/Creator: Worthington, Henry R.

The city of Shreveport could not justify the cost of building a water distribution system solely for the purpose of supplying potable water. It was a series of disastrous fires in the 1880s that galvanized support for a pumping facility that would provide ample water for firefighting. 

YearAdded:
1999
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: McNeill Street Pumping StationEra_date_from: 1887
Fairmount Water Works
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1815Schuylkill RiverPhiladelphiaState: PAZip: 19130Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/21-fairmount-water-worksCreator: Graff, Frederick , Latrobe, Benjamin

At a time when steam power was finding its first uses in America, Philadelphia opened two steam pumping stations, January 1801, to lift water from the Schuylkill River and distribute it through the city's wooden pipes and mains. By 1811 a new water power works was begun on the river near Morris Hill, and the Fairmount Water Works opened September 7, 1815. These water works represented the first large-scale application of steam pumping to water service in the country.

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Fairmount Waterworks, East bank of Schuylkill River, Aquarium Drive, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA View looking northeast at waterworks from across Schuylkill River. Photo taken December, 1984.
Era_date_from: 1815
Colorado River Aqueduct
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1933-1941Fullerton
Parker Dam
State: CACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Colorado-River-Aqueduct/Creator: Weymouth, Frank E.

Stretching 242 miles from the Colorado River on the California-Arizona border to its final holding reservoir near Riverside, California, the Colorado River Aqueduct consists of more than 90 miles of tunnels, nearly 55 miles of cut-and-cover conduit, almost 30 miles of siphons, and five pumping stations. Supplying approximately 1.2 million acre-feet of water a year - more than a billion gallons a day - it helped make possible the phenomenal growth of Los Angeles, San Diego, and surrounding Southern California areas in the second half of the 20th century. 

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Chuck Coker (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Colorado River Aqueduct sinks into a tunnel underneath California State Highway 62Era_date_from: 1933
Louisville Water Works
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1830LouisvilleState: KYZip: 40207Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/louisville-waterworks/Creator: Ledoux, Claude-Nichols

In the 18th century, French architect Claude-Nichols Ledoux was known for forging architectural beauty with industrial efficiency. One hundred years later his vision was given new life through the design of the Louisville Water Company Pumping Station.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Louisville Water WorksEra_date_from: 1830
Subscribe to Pumping Station
Stay informed - subscribe to our newsletter.
The subscriber's email address.