Skip to main content

Steam

Turbinia
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1897Tyne and Wear Museums ServiceNewcastle upon TyneZip: NE1 4Country: UKWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-73-turbinia-%281897%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/49f372ec-0fe3-4447-bcc2-30b5b58e7032/73-Turbinia-1897.aspxCreator: Parsons, Charles Algernon, Parsons Marine Steam Turbine Company

The Turbinia was the world's first turbine-driven ship. It attracted worldwide attention at the 1897 Spithead Naval Review by traveling more than 34 knots. This remarkable performance accelerated the acceptance of the steam turbine as an alternative to the steam reciprocating engine on ships as well as for central electric light and power stations. Sir Charles A. Parsons (1854-1931) invented (1884), developed, and promoted the steam turbine, as well as the design of the Turbinia. For this, he is considered among the outstanding technological innovators of all time.

YearAdded:
1982
Image Credit: Public Domain (Copyright Expired)Image Caption: TurbiniaEra_date_from: 1897
SS Badger Carferry
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1952Lake MichiganLudingtonState: MIZip: 49431Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-191-ss-badger-carferry-%281952%29Creator: Christy Corporation, Skinner Engine Company

The two 3,500-hp steeple compound Unaflow steam engines powering the S.S. Badger represent one of the last types of reciprocating marine steam engines. Built by the Skinner Engine Company, most Unaflow engines are single expansion. These feature tandem high- and low-pressure cylinders separated by a common head. The Badger's four Foster-Wheeler Type D marine boilers, which supply 470-psig steam to the engines, are among the last coal-fired marine boilers built. 

YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/ssbadger (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: SS Badger CarferryEra_date_from: 1952
Rumely Companies' Agricultural Products
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: AgricultureEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 18531007 Lincolnway La PorteState: INCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/agriculture/-225-rumely-companies--agricultural-products-%281853, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/d44ed4fd-8920-4082-9a6a-b0a7a4f0c99a/225-Rumely-Companies-Agricultural-Products.aspxCreator: Rumely, Meinrad

Beginning with the blacksmith shop of German immigrant Meinrad Rumely (1823-1904), this successive family of firms invented and produced a line of agricultural equipment that played a vital role in the evolution of farming based on the muscle of humans and animals to one based on the power of the steam and ultimately the internal-combustion engine. The M. & J. Rumely Co. became the M. Rumely Co., and then the Advance Rumely Co. The Allis-Chalmers Company acquired the business in 1931.

Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/BulldozerD11 (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Rumely Companies' Agricultural ProductsEra_date_from: 1853
Pratt Institute Power Plant
Society: ASMEMain Category: Electric, MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1887BrooklynState: NYCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-steam/-25-pratt-institute-power-plant-%281887%29Creator: Pratt, Charles

Steam and the inexpensive electricity it could produce brought about dramatic technical growth in the United States. Developed during the last century, reliable and efficient steam engines were the forerunners of today's massive generating facilities. A rare survivor of the period, the Pratt facility is the oldest generating plant of its kind in the Northeast and embodies the typical features of engines in a row, open-front marble switchboard, and an observation balcony at street level.

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Pratt Institute Power PlantEra_date_from: 1887
Port Washington Power Plant
Society: ASMEMain Category: Electric, MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1935Wisconsin Electric Power CompanyMilwaukeeState: WIZip: 52303Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-steam/-51-port-washington-power-plant-%281935%29Creator: Wisconsin Electric Company

The Port Washington Power Plant of the Wisconsin Electric Company was the most thermally efficient steam power plant in the world for many years following its opening in 1935. Its design reflected the cumulative experience of the utility's engineers in burning pulverized coal at the Oneida Street Plant and the Lakeside Station in Milwaukee.

YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: The dedication of Port Washington Power Plant coincided with the 100th anniversary of the founding of the city in which it is located.Era_date_from: 1935
Philadelphia Municipal Water Supply
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 18012600 Benjamin Franklin PkwyPhiladelphiaState: PAZip: 19130Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Philadelphia-Municipal-Water-Supply/Creator: Graff, Frederick , Latrobe, Benjamin

After an initial difficulty in attracting customers (who were used to getting their water from public pumps and private wells and cisterns), Philadelphia's waterworks soon couldn't keep up with demand. John Davis and Frederick Graff designed a complete remodeling of the system in 1811 so that it could supply the city's growing needs. 

YearAdded:
1974
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Philadelphia Municipal Water SupplyEra_date_from: 1801
Lookout Mountain Incline Railway
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895Lookout MountainChattanoogaState: TNZip: 37350Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/rail-transportation---2/-156-lookout-mountain-incline-railway-%281895%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/769218e7-8ab4-486a-8de5-f5e7a4299859/156-Lookout-Mountain-Incline-Railway-1895.aspxCreator: Crass, John , Lookout Mountain Incline Railway Company

At the mountain where the Civil War's Battle Above the Clouds was waged, tourist business has thrived from the building of its first toll road (Whiteside Pike) in 1857 to present day.

YearAdded:
1991
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Duane Tate (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Lookout Mountain Incline RailwayEra_date_from: 1895
Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, RoadSub Category: Road TransportationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1910Lumberman's MuseumPattenState: MEZip: 04765Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/road-and-off-road-transportation/-79-lombard-steam-log-hauler-%281910%29Creator: Lombard, Alvin
This steam crawler-tractor emancipated horses from the killing work of hauling trains of sleds over iced roads in the winter woods of the United States and Canada. Designed, patented (1901), and built by Alvin C. Lombard (1856-1937) of Waterville, Maine, eighty-three "Lombards" were the first practical examples of the often-tried lag or crawler tread that would become the mark of the internal combustion engine-driven agricultural and construction equipment and military tank in current use.
YearAdded:
1982
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/cliff1066,Image Caption: Lombard Steam Log HaulerEra_date_from: 1910
Joshua Hendy Iron Works
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1906401 E Hendy AveSunnyvaleState: CAZip: 94086Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/-34-joshua-hendy-iron-works-%281906%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/4c99ebb6-8005-461a-a215-0af2f8eaf17c/34-Joshua-Hendy-Iron-Works.aspxCreator: Hendy, Joshua

This ironworks exemplified the adaptability required for industrial survival in a dynamic technical environment. It was a major western producer of mechanical equipment used in mining (especially large hydraulic machines), ship propulsion, irrigation, power generation, optical telescope mounts, and nuclear research.

YearAdded:
1978
Image Credit: Public DomainImage Caption: Joshua Hendy Iron WorksEra_date_from: 1906
Society: ASMEMain Category: CivilSub Category: AgricultureEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1903Charles CityState: IACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/agriculture/-190-hart-parr-tractor-%281903%29Creator: Hart, Charles Walter
This landmark artifact represents the first commercially successful farm tractor in the world powered by an internal-combustion engine. It was invented and built by Charles W. Hart and Charles H. Parr in Charles City, Iowa, as their Model 3, following two prototype versions.
YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Norbert Schnitzler (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Hart Parr TractorEra_date_from: 1903
Subscribe to Steam
Stay informed - subscribe to our newsletter.
The subscriber's email address.