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1920-1929

Rubber Tractor Tires
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: VehiclesEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1926Orange County Historical SocietyOrangeState: VAZip: 22960Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/rubber-tractor-tires-34.aspxCreator: Pounds, Hoyle, Allis-Chalmers Company, Roorda, Hessel

Early tractors were massive and expensive. Their steel lug wheels gave poor traction and a rough ride. Lugs were prohibited on many roads. 1926 Hoyle Pounds modified a Fordson tractor with zero pressure truck tires on special rims to improve performance on sandy soils in Winter Garden, FL.

A successful business resulted. In 1929 Hessel Roorda equipped Farmall tractors with low pressure rubber tires to pick corn in muddy fields near Rock Valley, IA. Farmers found they performed well in all conditions.

YearAdded:
1995
Image Caption: A modern rubber tractor tire
Parshall Flume
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1922Lory Student CenterFort CollinsState: COZip: 80521Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/parshall-flume-19.aspxCreator: Parshall, Ralph L.

Since the beginning of irrigated agriculture, it has been important to measure flows of irrigation water. Accuracy of early water measurement methods often suffered because of trash or sediment in the water, or unusual flow conditions. Ralph L. Parshall saw this problem when he began working for the USDA in 1915, as an irrigation research engineer. In 1922 he invented the flume now known by his name. When this flume is placed in a channel, flow is uniquely related to the water depth.

YearAdded:
1985
Image Credit: Public Domain
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1926Agricultural Engineering Building AE - Building 298ColumbusState: OHZip: 43210Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/ives-hall-1.aspx

In 1926, Ives Hall, the original Agricultural Engineering Building at The Ohio State University, Columbus, was designated as ASAE's first engineering landmark in honor of department founder and 18th president of ASAE Fredrick Walter Ives. Frederick W. Ives 1884 - 1924.

Ives Hall was on the corner of Neil and Woodruff Avenues from 1926 - 2002. This display has been constructed with brick from the original structure.

FMC Sterilizer
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Food ProcessingEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1920FPSD manufacturing plantMaderaState: CACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/fmc-sterilizer-27.aspxCreator: Thompson, Albert R.

The Food Canning Industry Was Revolutionized In 1920, When The Continuous Rotary Pressure Sterilizer Was Introduced By Albert R. Thompson. Thompson Was Chief Engineer For The Anderson-Barngrover Co. Of San Jose, California, Now The FMC Corporation. The Sterilizer Cooked Canned Products Uniformly Under Pressure For Short Period At High Temperatures, Then Quickly Cooled Them Under Pressure To Prevent Swelling Or Bursting. It Operated Continuously At Speeds Of Up To 400 Cans Per Minute.

YearAdded:
1992
Image Caption: The FMC Rotary Pressure Sterilizer
Ann Arbor Baler
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1929ShelbyvilleState: ILCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/ann-arbor-baler-13.aspxCreator: Raymore McDonald

Designated an Historic Landmark of Agricultural Engineering. In the Shelbyville Area During the Spring of 1929, Raymore McDonald Designed and Developed the First Commercial Pick-Up Baler as Conceived and Financed by Horace Tallman and His Sons, Leslie R. and Gentry L. These Balers were Marketed for Many Years by the Ann Arbor Machine Company of Shelbyville. This Concept of Field Processing of Farm Forages Made a Significant Contribution to the Efficiency and Economy of Mechanized Forage Harvesting in the World's Agriculture.

Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Wystan (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: 1904 advertisement for the Ann Arbor
“Slanted oil wells are the latest sensation of the oil industry,” reports May 1934 Popular Science Monthly article.
Society: SPEMain Category: PetroleumSub Category: ExtractionEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1929ConroeState: TXCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.spe.org/industry/history/timeline.phpCreator: Eastman, H. John

H. John Eastman introduces controlled directional drilling in 1929 and was awarded a patent the following year.

The technique became widely adopted after an oil strike in Conroe, Texas, caught fire in January 1933. The well exploded, creating a 600-foot deep crater, and the oil burned for months. Although the fire was eventually put out,  oil continued to flow into the “lake.” The only way to manage this was to drill another well to relieve the pressure.

Image Credit: American Oil & Gas Historical SocietyImage Caption: “Slanted oil wells are the latest sensation of the oil industry,” reports May 1934 Popular Science Monthly article. “Drilled by experts who use special tools and secret methods to send the bit burrowing into the ground at strange angles, they are finding amazing new applications.”
Oakland Airport Modern Aerial View
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 19251 Airport DrOaklandState: CACountry: USAWebsite: https://info.aiaa.org/tac/ETMG/HISTC/Shared%20Documents/Historic%20Aerospace%20Sites%20(HAS)/Procedures%20and%20templates/Sites-by-state-plaque-wording.doc

This site, formerly known as Oakland Municipal Airport, served as the gateway to the Pacific during aviation’s pioneering age of trans-Pacific flight. Among other notable events, Albert Hegenberger and Lester Maitland departed from the airfield on 28 June 1927 on the first flight from the mainland to Hawaii, and Amelia Earhart landed here on 13 January 1935, completing the first-ever solo flight from Hawaii to the mainland.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Caption: Modern Oakland Municipal Airport aerial view
 Dr. Robert H. Goddard and a liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket at Auburn, Massachusetts.
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 192620 Upland StreetAuburnState: MACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/uploadedFiles/Education_and_Careers/STEM_K-12_Outreach/Kids_Place/Rockets_Activities/Pop%20Rockets%20Activity%5B1%5D.pdfCreator: Goddard, Dr. Robert H.

On March 16, 1926 Dr. Robert H. Goddard, also known as "the father of modern rocketry," launched the world’s first liquid propellant rocket from a point 1000 feet S.S.E. of the plaque on the property of the Asa M. Ward Family.  Erected by the American Rocket Society July 13, 1960 in recognition of this significant achievement in the evolution of astronautics.

YearAdded:
2000
Image Caption: Dr. Robert H. Goddard and a liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket at Auburn, Massachusetts
Pratt & Whitney Wasp A, R-1300 (R-1340)
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1925New England Air MuseumWindsor LocksState: CTZip: 06096Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/engineering-history/landmarks/260-pratt-whitney-r1340-wasp-radialCreator: Rentschler, Fredrick

Aircraft engines, considered unreliable during the first 20 years of aviation due to their need for liquid-cooling, heavy weight and other inconsistencies, were given a revolutionary boost with the development of Pratt & Whitney’s R-1340 Wasp Radial Engine in 1925.

YearAdded:
2015
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/nostri-imago (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Pratt & Whitney Wasp A, R-1300 (R-1340)
LeTourneau "Mountain Mover" Scraper
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1922LeTourneau UniversityLongviewState: TXZip: 75602Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/231-letourneau-mountain-mover-scraper, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/9a19caec-9336-4263-9b34-6d13ae6b7153/231-LeTourneau-Mountain-Mover-Scraper.aspxCreator: LeTourneau, Robert G.

 When Robert G. LeTourneau started moving earth in 1919, he thought that land leveling should require only one man. In 1920, by installing a generator and electric motors, R.G. was able to control the scraper blade from the tractor seat while driving the tractor.

 In June 1922, LeTourneau developed his “Mountain Mover” with a telescoping bowl. He incorporated a floor behind the cutting edge taken from his previous designs, and employed welding instead of riveting to save weight.

YearAdded:
2004
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