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Pickup Forage Harvester
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1930-1949DateCreated: 1931Agricultural Engineering Laboratory, University of WisconsinMadisonState: WIZip: 53911Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/forage-harvester-22.aspxCreator: Saiberlich, Erwin W.

William J. Conroy Of Aylmer, Quebec, Received Patent No. 465,127 On The First Field Hay Chopper On 15 December, 1891. Its Sickle Cut The Crop, Which Was Elevated Directly Into A Cylindrical Curved-Bar Cutterhead. It Was Not Commercially Successful, But It Recognized The Need.

Professor Floyd Waldo Duffee, Agricultural Engineering Department, University Of Wisconsin, Built And Field Tested A Silo Filler With An Attached Hay Loader In 1926. He Presented The Specifications Of A Complete Unified Harvester To The National Asabe Meeting In 1927.

YearAdded:
1988
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Bob Adams (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Claas Jaguar 870 forage harvester with pickup header
Agricultural Engineering Building - University of Wisconsin
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: EducationEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1907University of Wisconsin Biological Systems EngineeringMadisonState: WIZip: 53706Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/ae-building-uw-2.aspx

American Society of Agricultural Engineers Founded in this Building December 27, 1907

YearAdded:
1982
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/James Steakley (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Vulcan Street Plant
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Power GenerationEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1882Fox RiverAppletonState: WIZip: 54911Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/29-vulcan-street-power-plant, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/c0b5b641-34df-46a5-aa22-c847b42084b4/29-Vulcan-Street-Power-Plant.aspxCreator: Rogers, H.J. , Edison, Thomas

The plant began operation only twenty-six days after Thomas Edison's first steam plant began operating on Pearl Street in New York (NL 46). On September 30, 1882, an Edison "K" type dynamo produced electricity from a water-powered turbine to light three buildings (two paper mills and the H.J. Rogers home), at rate of about 12 1/2 kilowatts. It is the first Edison hydroelectric central station to serve a system of private and commercial customers in North America. The story of its development provides keen insight into the nation's first experiences with the electric light.

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/bigcityal (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Vulcan Street PlantEra_date_from: 1882
Port Washington Power Plant
Society: ASMEMain Category: Electric, MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1935Wisconsin Electric Power CompanyMilwaukeeState: WIZip: 52303Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-steam/-51-port-washington-power-plant-%281935%29Creator: Wisconsin Electric Company

The Port Washington Power Plant of the Wisconsin Electric Company was the most thermally efficient steam power plant in the world for many years following its opening in 1935. Its design reflected the cumulative experience of the utility's engineers in burning pulverized coal at the Oneida Street Plant and the Lakeside Station in Milwaukee.

YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: The dedication of Port Washington Power Plant coincided with the 100th anniversary of the founding of the city in which it is located.Era_date_from: 1935
Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewage Treatment Plant
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1919Lake FreewayMilwaukeeState: WIZip: 53207Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Milwaukee-Metropolitan-Sewage-Treatment-Plant/

This was America's first large-scale activated sludge plant. The successful operation of Milwaukee's sewage treatment plant led the way for many other American municipalities to adopt its methods of efficient environmental recycling.

Prior to 1925, sewage and industrial waste from the City of Milwaukee and its suburbs (then population 500,000) was discharged to the Milwaukee, Menomonee, and Kinnickinnic rivers, which converge in Milwaukee and flow together through a single outlet into Lake Michigan.

YearAdded:
1974
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewage Treatment PlantEra_date_from: 1919
Milwaukee River Flushing Station
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Solid WasteEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1888 RiverMilwaukeeState: WICountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/solid-waste/-166-milwaukee-river-flushing-station-%281888%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/759894e1-2be9-4a23-942b-2d2c272336a5/166-Milwaukee-River-Flushing-Station-1888.aspxCreator: Reynolds, Edwin, Edward P. Allis Company

This pump, designed by Edwin Reynolds (1831-1909) and built by the Edward P. Allis company, is the major component of one of the earliest water-pollution control systems. It was capable of pumping more than a half billion gallons of water a day, the highest-capacity pump in the world when installed. It still is used during the summer to pump water from Lake Michigan into the Milwaukee River upstream of the downtown area. This maintains a current in the lower portion of the river and greatly reduces the concentration of pollutants.

YearAdded:
1992
Image Caption: Milwaukee River Flushing StationEra_date_from: 1888
Marshall Building
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1906207 E. Buffalo StreetMilwaukeeState: WIZip: 53202Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Marshall-Building/Creator: Turner, Claude

Designed by Claude A. P. Turner, a pioneer of reinforced concrete construction, the Marshall Building was constructed originally in 1906 as a five-story building. In 1911 the sixth floor of the building was added as per Turner's original design. This building is the oldest extant example of Turner's "mushroom" flat-slab system which transformed the design and construction of reinforced-concrete floors worldwide.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy ASCEImage Caption: Marshall BuildingEra_date_from: 1906
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1909Outboard Marine CorpMilwaukeeState: WIZip: 53218Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-65-evinrude-outboard-motor-%281909%29Creator: Evinrude, Ole
This outboard motor, designed and built by Ole Evinrude (1877-1934) at the Evinrude Motor Company in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was quickly accepted by the boating public of the United States. Bess Evinrude called the prototype a "coffee grinder," but it moved a boat through water better than the huge steam- or foot-driven motors available in 1907. She encouraged him to build and sell ten, then twenty, soon resulting in the redirection of their automotive equipment business to outboard motors.
YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Mr. T in DC (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Evinrude Outboard MotorEra_date_from: 1909
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Research and DevelopmentEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1928WaukeshaState: WICountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/research-and-development/-50-cooperative-fuel-research-engine-%281928%29Creator: Waukesha Motor Company

The Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine is used extensively throughout the world for testing, research, and instruction in the performance of fuels and lubricants for the internal combustion engine. Principal design work on this prototype engine was accomplished by engineers of Waukesha Motor Company, now a division of Dresser Industries, who served on a Cooperative Fuel Research Committee with representatives of the American Petroleum Institute, Society of Automotive Engineers, Automobile Manufacturers Association, and the National Bureau of Standards.

YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Courtesy Colorado State UniversityImage Caption: Cooperative Fuel Research EngineEra_date_from: 1928
Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, ElectricSub Category: SteamEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1918108 E Wells StreetMilwaukeeState: WIZip: 53202Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-steam/-42-east-wells-%28onieda%29-street-power-plant-%281918%29, http://sections.asme.org/milwaukee/history/4-pulverizedcoal.htmlCreator: Esser, Herman, Anderson, John
Formerly known as the Oneida Street Power Plant, this plant served from 1918 to 1920 as the pilot plant in the United States for the development and use of finely pulverized coal firing in the boilers of steam-electric power plants. The results of the Oneida experiences were major changes in boiler design and lower costs of power generation. Following the early years of central station electric development, experiments at Onieda Street resolved persisting inefficiencies at a time when coal was increasingly expensive and of poorer quality.
YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Image source:
Wisconsin Historical Society
Image Caption: East Wells Onieda Street Power PlantEra_date_from: 1918
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