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Equipment, Harvesting and Baling

Pickup Forage Harvester
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1930-1949DateCreated: 1931Agricultural Engineering Laboratory, University of WisconsinMadisonState: WIZip: 53911Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/forage-harvester-22.aspxCreator: Saiberlich, Erwin W.

William J. Conroy Of Aylmer, Quebec, Received Patent No. 465,127 On The First Field Hay Chopper On 15 December, 1891. Its Sickle Cut The Crop, Which Was Elevated Directly Into A Cylindrical Curved-Bar Cutterhead. It Was Not Commercially Successful, But It Recognized The Need.

Professor Floyd Waldo Duffee, Agricultural Engineering Department, University Of Wisconsin, Built And Field Tested A Silo Filler With An Attached Hay Loader In 1926. He Presented The Specifications Of A Complete Unified Harvester To The National Asabe Meeting In 1927.

YearAdded:
1988
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Bob Adams (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Claas Jaguar 870 forage harvester with pickup header
Massey-Harris #20 Combine
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1938Ford MuseumDearbornState: MIZip: 48124Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/massey-harris-20-combine-15.aspx, https://www.thehenryford.org/collections-and-research/digital-collections/artifact/18684/#slide=gs-274942Creator: Carroll, Thomas

Designated A Historic Landmark Of Agricultural Engineering The Massey-Harris No. 20 was the First Commercially- Successful Self-Propelled Combine Used to Harvest Small Grains Under a Wide Variety of Conditions, World-Wide. Engineered By Thomas Carroll, Chief Engineer, Aided by Robert Ashton and Albert Luke, Principal Assistants, it was First Marketed in 1938 by the Massey-Harris Company. This Combine Opened a New Era an Farm Mechanization and Revolutionized the Grain Harvesting Process. Forty-Four Years Later, This Same Harvesting Principle Continues to be Used Throughout the World.

YearAdded:
1982
Image Caption: Combine pictured at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI
Hume-Love Cutterbar and Reel
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1930Horn School Rest AreaRosaliaState: WAZip: 99170Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/hume-love-cutterbar-29.aspxCreator: Hume, Horace D.

Near This Location In The 1930's James E. Love And Horace D. Hume Of Garfield, Washington, Invented The Flexible Floating Cutterbar And The Tined Pickup Reel To Harvest Low-Growing, Fragile Crops. These Devices Were Developed For The Local Crops Of Dry Peas And Lentils And Were Then Adopted Nationwide To Soybeans And Other Low-Growing Crops That Tangle And Lodge. These Mechanisms Reduced Dry Pea Harvesting Costs By 28% And Crop Loss From 50 To 10%. These Inventions Were Reported To Save The Equivalent Of 2,750,000 Acres Of Soybeans Annually.

YearAdded:
1993
Corn Silage Harvester
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1892Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering BuildingFalcon HeightsState: MNZip: 55108Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/corn-silage-harvester-26.aspx

Charles C. Fenno Of Grinnell, Ia, Patented The First Field Corn Silage Harvester On April 19, 1892. His Ground-Powered Machine Cut The Corn Plant And Fed The Tassel End First To A Rotary Cutter. Joseph Weigel Of Flandreau, Sd, Improved Fenno's Harvester In 1912 By Adding An Engine To Power The Cutter And By Feeding The Stalks Butt End First. Andrean And Adolph Ronning, Farmers Of Boyd, Mn Patented Further Improvements In 1915. In 1918 The American Harvester Co. Of Minneapolis, Mn, Began Manufacturing The Horse-Drawn Ronning Harvester Using Weigel's Patent Too.

YearAdded:
1992
Ann Arbor Baler
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1929ShelbyvilleState: ILCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/ann-arbor-baler-13.aspxCreator: Raymore McDonald

Designated an Historic Landmark of Agricultural Engineering. In the Shelbyville Area During the Spring of 1929, Raymore McDonald Designed and Developed the First Commercial Pick-Up Baler as Conceived and Financed by Horace Tallman and His Sons, Leslie R. and Gentry L. These Balers were Marketed for Many Years by the Ann Arbor Machine Company of Shelbyville. This Concept of Field Processing of Farm Forages Made a Significant Contribution to the Efficiency and Economy of Mechanized Forage Harvesting in the World's Agriculture.

Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Wystan (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: 1904 advertisement for the Ann Arbor
McCormick Reaper
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1831McCormick FarmRaphineState: VAZip: 24472Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/mccormick-reaper-4.aspxCreator: McCormick, Cyrus Hall

McCormick was born on the 620-acre farm known historically as “Walnut Grove Farm” in 1809.  He built the first practical grain reaper, which was successfully demonstrated in a field of oats owned by John Steele in nearby Steeles Tavern in 1831.  

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy of the Shenandoah Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center.Image Caption: The McCormick reaper was first demonstrated at the Walnut Grove Farm in Virginia.Era_date_from: 1831
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1943National Museum of History & TechnologyWashingtonState: DCZip: 20560Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/old-red-cotton-picker-10.aspxCreator: Rust, John, Rust, Mack
"The development of the cotton picker was the most important single factor which enabled the American cotton industry to stay alive," observed Dr. George S. Buck, Jr., director of research for the National Cotton Council recenty. Some 96% of the 1969 U.S. cotton crop was harvested by machines, points out J.W. Wegener, manager of International Harvester's Memphis Works manager. "Old Red" was built by International Harvester in 1943, retired in 1959, and restored in 1964.
YearAdded:
1978
Image Credit: Photo Courtesy of ASABEImage Caption: "Old Red" now resides in the National Museum of History & Technology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.Era_date_from: 1943
The Cotton Module Builder
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1970-1979DateCreated: 1971Scoates HallCollege StationState: TXCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/cotton-module-builder-40.aspxCreator: Wilkes, Lambert , Jones, J.K. "Farmer"
Cotton was once transported from farms to gins by wagons, trucks or trailers. Long waits to unload at the gin stalled harvests until haulers could return to the fields. Professor Lambert Wilkes of the Department of Agricultural Engineering, Texas A&M University, developed the Cotton Module Builder between 1971 and 1974 with the support of J.K. (Farmer) Jones of Cotton Incorporated. The modules created by the Cotton Module Builder withstood weather, and after transport, the cotton could be easily fed into the gin. Dr.
YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Photo by Beaver (Thomas John Macartney)Image Caption: The cotton module builder revolutionized the cotton industry.Era_date_from: 1971
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