Skip to main content

Water Supply & Control

Charles River Basin Project
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1910BostonState: MACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Charles-River-Basin-Project/Creator: Freeman, John

The Charles River Basin was one of the pioneering environmental engineering projects in America. The project transformed 675 acres of unhealthy and unsightly salt marshes and tidal flats were into an environmental centerpiece for the Boston area by 1910. This was one of the first public projects to radically improve the environment and has served as a model for similar projects around the nation. 

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Daderot (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Charles River Basin ProjectEra_date_from: 1910
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1952Pioneer VillageMindenState: NEZip: 68959Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/center-pivot-irrigator-30.aspxCreator: Zybach, Frank
Frank Zybach, a tenant farmer and inventor living near Strasburg, Colorado, received a patent for a "Self-Propelled Sprinkling Irrigating Apparatus" on July 22, 1952. The device used mobile towers to continuously move a pipeline in a circle around a pivot. Water was supplied through the pivot and distributed by sprinklers on the pipeline. Zybach formed a partnership with A.E. Trowbridge, an entrepreneur-businessman, in 1953 to manufacture center pivots in Columbus, Nebraska.
YearAdded:
1993
Image Credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture photoImage Caption: The Center Pivot Irrigator transformed agricultural production throughout the world.Era_date_from: 1952
Hohokam Canal System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1000-1599DateCreated: 600 - 1450 ADPueblo Grande MuseumPhoenixState: AZZip: 85034Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Hohokam-Canal-System/Creator: Hohokam Indians

Developed by the Hohokam, a prehistoric group of Native Americans, the canal system in the Salt River Valley serviced more than 100,000 acres of mostly arid desert country in what is now southern Arizona. The prehistoric Hohokam constructed one of the largest and most sophisticated irrigation networks ever created using pre-industrial technology. 

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Dave Hogg (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: The Hohokam irrigation system included some 700 miles of canals.Era_date_from: 600
Goldfields Water Supply
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1903LOT 2714 Goldfields HwyKalgoorlieState: W AustZip: 6430Country: AustraliaWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Goldfields-Water-Supply/Creator: Hodgson, Thomas C. , O'Connor, Charles Yelverton

Originally known as the Coolgardie Goldfields Water Supply Scheme, the Goldfields Water Supply, Western Australia, has exceptional and unique cultural significance for Australia.  Western Australia's first Premier, the dynamic and visionary Sir John Forrest, recognized the need for this extraordinary project to support the young and burgeoning gold mining industry in the dry interior of the state.  In 1896 he directed C Y O'Connor, the colony's first Engineer-in-Chief, to find a permanent solution to the water supply problem in the area, which lacked any permanent surface water supplies and

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Fernando de Sousa (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Goldfields Water SupplyEra_date_from: 1903
Galveston Seawall and Grade Raising
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1911GalvestonState: TXCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/galveston-seawall-and-grade-raising-project/Creator: Noble, Alfred, J.M. O'Rourke and Company

Galveston Island is a barrier island located two miles off the Texas coast. The island is about 3 miles wide at its widest and about 28 miles long. The Galveston Seawall extends over 10 miles along Galveston's oceanfront, protecting life and property against hurricanes and tropical storms. 

YearAdded:
2001
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Ed Schipul (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Galveston Seawall and Grade RaisingEra_date_from: 1911
Delaware Aqueduct of the Delaware & Hudson Canal
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Bridges, Transportation, Water Supply & ControlEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1848Delaware RiverMinisink FordState: NYZip: 18435Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Roebling-s-Delaware-Aqueduct/Creator: Roebling, John

The Delaware Aqueduct provided an important transportation link between the Pennsylvania's coalmines and New York's booming industrial marketplace. It is the earliest surviving work of John A. Roebling, who designed the Brooklyn Bridge  30 years later. The cable anchorage system first used on this project was also used on the Brooklyn Bridge. The aqueduct is patterned after Roebling's design of the Pennsylvania Canal over the Allegheny River, and is the oldest metal strand cable suspension bridge still standing in the U.S.

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Doug Kerr (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Delaware Aqueduct of the Delaware & Hudson CanalEra_date_from: 1848
Croton Water Supply System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1842Croton RiverNew YorkState: NYCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/croton-water-supply-systems/Creator: Jervis, John

Inferior water and the lack of a sufficient water supply prompted public pressure to find a significant water source for the 360,000 of people living in New York City at the time. Studies determined that the Croton River, 40 miles north of the city, was the best available source. The original system served as a prototype for large-scale water supply projects across America. 

YearAdded:
1975
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Otterman56 (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Croton Water Supply SystemEra_date_from: 1842
Colorado River Aqueduct
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1933-1941Fullerton
Parker Dam
State: CACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Colorado-River-Aqueduct/Creator: Weymouth, Frank E.

Stretching 242 miles from the Colorado River on the California-Arizona border to its final holding reservoir near Riverside, California, the Colorado River Aqueduct consists of more than 90 miles of tunnels, nearly 55 miles of cut-and-cover conduit, almost 30 miles of siphons, and five pumping stations. Supplying approximately 1.2 million acre-feet of water a year - more than a billion gallons a day - it helped make possible the phenomenal growth of Los Angeles, San Diego, and surrounding Southern California areas in the second half of the 20th century. 

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Chuck Coker (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Colorado River Aqueduct sinks into a tunnel underneath California State Highway 62Era_date_from: 1933
Chain of Rocks Water Purification Plant
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1903Mississippi RiverSt. LouisState: MOCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Chain-of-Rocks-Water-Purification-Plant/

Clarifying the turbid waters of the Mississippi River for use as drinking water was a formidable challenge. The Chain of Rocks Water Purification Plant provided the first application of a system of flocculation, sedimentation, and rapid sand filtration for water purification.

The system played a major role in reducing the impact of St. Louis' typhoid and cholera epidemic of 1903 that claimed 287 lives. Continued improvements to the plant reduced that number to 91 by 1914. It is estimated that 1,900 lives were likely saved between 1903 and 1915 due to the filtration system.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Chain of Rocks Water Purification PlantEra_date_from: 1903
Cabin John Aqueduct
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Bridges, Transportation, Water Supply & ControlEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1864Cabin JohnState: MDCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Cabin-John-Aqueduct/Creator: Meigs, Montgomery

Cabin John Aqueduct, designed by Montgomery C. Meigs, conveys drinking water from Great Falls, Maryland to Washington, D.C. It was the longest stone masonry arch in the world for nearly 40 years. The segmental arch of the bridge has a span of 220 feet and a rise of only 57 feet. The main arch ring is built of cut and dressed granite. The secondary arch ring is radially-laid sandstone, of which the rest of the bridge is also constructed. 

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Cabin John AqueductEra_date_from: 1864
Subscribe to Water Supply & Control
Stay informed - subscribe to our newsletter.
The subscriber's email address.