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Water Supply & Control

Bethlehem Waterworks
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1750-1799DateCreated: 1761Historic Subdistrict ABethlehemState: PAZip: 18018Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Bethlehem-Waterworks/Creator: Christiansen, Hans Christopher , Moravians

The first known pumping system providing drinking and wash water in the North American colonies. The building (still standing) is dated 1761, but it was preceded by an experimental frame building dated 1754. Before the Bethlehem built its system, assigned carriers would daily haul water up the hill from a well near the city gate. A wooden waterwheel, driven by the flow of Monocacy Creek, drove wooden pumps which lifted the water through wooden pipes to the top of the hill where the water was distributed by gravity.

YearAdded:
1971
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Discover Lehigh Valley (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Through multiple restorations (1964, 1972, 1975), the Bethlehem Waterworks still stands today, despite being over 250 years old.Era_date_from: 1761
Belle Fourche Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Dams, Water Supply & ControlEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1911confluence of the Redwater and Belle Fourche RiversBelle FourcheState: SDZip: 57754Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Belle-Fourche-Dam/Creator: Orman & Crook

Belle Fourche, meaning "Beautiful Forks" in French, refers to the confluence of the Redwater and Belle Fourche Rivers. The gold rush to the Black Hills in 1876 brought many people to the area, but agriculture and livestock soon became the principal industries. Farmers and civic leaders recognized the need for a reliable source of irrigation water in this semi-arid region and petitioned the Federal government for funds to build an irrigation and flood control system.

YearAdded:
1988
Image Credit: Public Domain (United States Bureau of Reclamation)Image Caption: An aerial view of the Belle Fourche DamEra_date_from: 1911
Acueducto de Segovia
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 0-1000DateCreated: First century ADCalle Teodosio El GrandeSegoviaState: SEGZip: 40001Country: SpainWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/acueduto-de-segovia/Creator: Emperor Trajan

For 2,000 years, Aqueducto de Segovia has been conveying drinking water from the Frio River to Segovia, approximately 18 kilometers away. Built under the reign of Roman emperor Trajan, the aqueduct is one of the most intact and best-preserved Roman engineering masterpieces. Roman engineers built the channel of the aqueduct with an average one percent gradient over its whole length.

YearAdded:
1999
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Nigel's Europe (CC BY-SA 2.0) Image Caption: A view from below of the highly symmetrical Segovia AqueductEra_date_from: First century AD
Acueducto de Queretaro
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1700-1749DateCreated: 1726 - 1738De Los Arcos 171Santiago de QuerétaroState: QuerétaroZip: 76020Country: MexicoWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/acueduto-de-queretaro/Creator: de Urrutia y Arana, Juan Antonio

Queretaro's aqueduct, in Central Mexico, is one of the most eloquent symbols of colonial Mexico. As one of the early major hydraulic engineering projects in North America, it defines the city both nationally and internationally. The aqueduct, designed in 1723 by Juan Antonio de Urrutia y Arana, Marquis of Villa del Villar del Aquila, was inspired by the aqueducts of Segovia, Merida and Tarragona in Spain. It began supplying clean water to the city in this arid region of Mexico on October 17, 1738.

YearAdded:
1995
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Ephobius (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Acueducto de QueretaroEra_date_from: 1726
Acquedotto Traiano-Paolo
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 0-1000DateCreated: 109-110RomeState: RICountry: ItalyWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/acquedotto-traiano-paolo/Creator: Emperor Trajan

The roman emperor Trajan ordered a new aqueduct be built to bring fresh water to Italy's Trastevere region and parts of Rome. The water is collected from five springs that feed the lake at Bracciano, and traverses over 25 miles into Rome. To maintain an even gradient, the aqueduct follows a meandering alignment through the countryside to avoid hills and major valleys. The water runs through an open-channel canal that is either arch-supported, at-grade, or underground.

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Courtesy of Sovraintendenza ai Beni Culturali.Image Caption: The Acquedotto Traiano-Paolo still brings water to Rome.Era_date_from: 109
The Espada Aqueduct, running over the Piedras Creek
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1700-1749DateCreated: 1718-1744San Antonio Missions National Historical ParkSan AntonioState: TXZip: 78221Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/acequias-of-san-antonio/Creator: Franciscan friars

This is one of the earliest uses of engineered water supply and irrigation systems in the United States. The first of eight original acequias was under construction in 1718 and two are still in operation. The remains of one are visible on the grounds of the Alamo. The Acequias of San Antonio are among the earliest engineered water supply and irrigation systems recorded in the United States. The Acequias served an integral role in the growth and stability of the San Antonio community for nearly 200 years.

YearAdded:
1968
Image Credit: Courtesy: Flickr/Amy the Nurse (CC BY-ND 2.0) Image Caption: The Espada Aqueduct, running over the Piedras CreekEra_date_from: 1718
Miami Conservancy District
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1922Taylorsville Dam (One of 5 Dams)Huber HeightsState: OHZip: 45424Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Miami-Conservancy-District/Creator: Flood Prevention Committee, Morgan, Arthur Ernest

The Miami Conservancy District flood control project was the direct result of the disastrous flood of 1913, when waters from the Miami, Stillwater, and Mad rivers flooded Dayton and surrounding communities in the Miami Valley. More than 400 lives were lost and property damage exceeded $100 million. When Dayton flooded, great fires raged, adding to the devastation. Many believed that the area would never recover. 

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/bobosh_t (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Taylorsville Dam, one of the five dry damns to come out of the Miami Conservancy DistrictEra_date_from: 1922
Marlette Lake Water System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1873-1887Lake Tahoe–Nevada State ParkCarson CityState: NVZip: 89703Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Marlette-Lake-Water-System/Creator: Schussler, Hermann

In the mid-1800s Virginia City was America's greatest producer of high-grade silver and gold ore. When mining activities began, natural springs provided water to the camps. As the population grew, the Virginia and Gold Hill Water Company was formed to address the need for more water. The company first drew water from tunnels that had been driven into the mountains by prospectors. Water was stored in wooden tanks and sent through pipes into the town. 

YearAdded:
1975
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Jeff Moser (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Marlette Lake Water SystemEra_date_from: 1873
Louisville Water Works
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1830LouisvilleState: KYZip: 40207Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/louisville-waterworks/Creator: Ledoux, Claude-Nichols

In the 18th century, French architect Claude-Nichols Ledoux was known for forging architectural beauty with industrial efficiency. One hundred years later his vision was given new life through the design of the Louisville Water Company Pumping Station.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Louisville Water WorksEra_date_from: 1830
Prehistoric Mesa Verde Reservoirs
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 0-1000DateCreated: 750-1180Mesa Verde National ParkMontezuma CountyState: COZip: 81330Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Prehistoric-Mesa-Verde-Reservoirs/Creator: Ancient Pueblo Peoples

Four prehistoric reservoirs at Mesa Verde National Park were constructed and used between AD 750 and AD 1180. They are: Morefield Reservoir (in Morefield Canyon), Far View Reservoir (on Chapin Mesa), Sagebrush Reservoir (on an unnamed mesa), and Box Elder Reservoir (in Prater Canyon). These four ancient reservoirs represent extraordinary engineering achievements by the Ancestral Puebloan people. In an arid environment with very little surface water, these prehistoric people found ways to route and capture runoff to create sustainable domestic water supply reservoirs.

YearAdded:
2004
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/McGhiever (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Prehistoric Mesa Verde ReservoirsEra_date_from: 750
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