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1972

Chesbrough's Water Supply System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1864-1869ChicagoState: ILZip: 60604Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/chesbrough-s-chicago-water-supply-system/Creator: Chesbrough, Ellis

Constructed to provide a safe, potable water supply for the citizens of Chicago, Ellis Chesbrough's Chicago Water Supply System was the first major system to utilize offshore intake systems. The system includes the landmark Chicago Water Tower and the Chicago Avenue Pumping Station. Its subaqueous tunnel was a pioneering effort in American civil engineering.

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/WickdrewImage Caption: Ellis Chesbrough's Chicago Water Supply System was the first major system to utilize offshore intake systems.Era_date_from: 1864
McCormick Reaper
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1831McCormick FarmRaphineState: VAZip: 24472Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/mccormick-reaper-4.aspxCreator: McCormick, Cyrus Hall

McCormick was born on the 620-acre farm known historically as “Walnut Grove Farm” in 1809.  He built the first practical grain reaper, which was successfully demonstrated in a field of oats owned by John Steele in nearby Steeles Tavern in 1831.  

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy of the Shenandoah Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center.Image Caption: The McCormick reaper was first demonstrated at the Walnut Grove Farm in Virginia.Era_date_from: 1831
Gunnison Tunnel
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: TunnelsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1909MontroseState: COCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Gunnison-Tunnel/Creator: Bureau of Reclamation

At its completion, the 5.8-mile Gunnison Tunnel under western Colorado's Vernal Mesa was the longest irrigation tunnel in America. It carried water from the Gunnison River to the Uncompahgre Valley to irrigate 146,000 acres of cropland. 

Work on the 30,582-foot tunnel was first performed manually. Adverse geological conditions provided great challenge for this pioneering project. The drilling crews had to deal with clay, sand, shale, and a badly fractured fault zone. 

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Gunnison TunnelEra_date_from: 1909
Delaware Aqueduct of the Delaware & Hudson Canal
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Bridges, Transportation, Water Supply & ControlEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1848Delaware RiverMinisink FordState: NYZip: 18435Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Roebling-s-Delaware-Aqueduct/Creator: Roebling, John

The Delaware Aqueduct provided an important transportation link between the Pennsylvania's coalmines and New York's booming industrial marketplace. It is the earliest surviving work of John A. Roebling, who designed the Brooklyn Bridge  30 years later. The cable anchorage system first used on this project was also used on the Brooklyn Bridge. The aqueduct is patterned after Roebling's design of the Pennsylvania Canal over the Allegheny River, and is the oldest metal strand cable suspension bridge still standing in the U.S.

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Doug Kerr (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Delaware Aqueduct of the Delaware & Hudson CanalEra_date_from: 1848
Cabin John Aqueduct
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Bridges, Transportation, Water Supply & ControlEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1864Cabin JohnState: MDCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Cabin-John-Aqueduct/Creator: Meigs, Montgomery

Cabin John Aqueduct, designed by Montgomery C. Meigs, conveys drinking water from Great Falls, Maryland to Washington, D.C. It was the longest stone masonry arch in the world for nearly 40 years. The segmental arch of the bridge has a span of 220 feet and a rise of only 57 feet. The main arch ring is built of cut and dressed granite. The secondary arch ring is radially-laid sandstone, of which the rest of the bridge is also constructed. 

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Cabin John AqueductEra_date_from: 1864
Brooklyn Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1883East RiverBrooklynState: NYZip: 11201Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Brooklyn-Bridge/Creator: Roebling, John, Roebling, Washington

On May 24, 1883, with schools and businesses closed for the occasion, New York celebrated the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge. Also known as the Great East River Bridge, it was built over 14 years in the face of enormous difficulties. Deaths, fire in the Brooklyn caisson, and a scandal over inferior materials all added to the turmoil. The bridge is one of the most well-recognized symbols of American engineering, and remains the unofficial Eighth Wonder of the World.

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Sarah Ackerman (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: The Brooklyn Bridge earned its title of (unofficial) Eight Wonder of the World through its incredible size and beautyEra_date_from: 1883
Miami Conservancy District
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1922Taylorsville Dam (One of 5 Dams)Huber HeightsState: OHZip: 45424Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Miami-Conservancy-District/Creator: Flood Prevention Committee, Morgan, Arthur Ernest

The Miami Conservancy District flood control project was the direct result of the disastrous flood of 1913, when waters from the Miami, Stillwater, and Mad rivers flooded Dayton and surrounding communities in the Miami Valley. More than 400 lives were lost and property damage exceeded $100 million. When Dayton flooded, great fires raged, adding to the devastation. Many believed that the area would never recover. 

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/bobosh_t (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Taylorsville Dam, one of the five dry damns to come out of the Miami Conservancy DistrictEra_date_from: 1922
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