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1992

Slow Moving Vehicle Emblem
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: VehiclesEra: 1960sDateCreated: 1963Agricultural Engineering Building AEColumbusState: OHZip: 43210Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/smv-28.aspxCreator: Harkness, Kenneth A.

Slow Moving Vehicle (SMV) Emblem Makes Significant Contributions To Agricultural And Highway Safety Worldwide. 1961- 63 Developed By Kenneth A. Harkness, Department Of Agricultural Engineering On The Ohio State University Campus. 1964 Became An ASAE Standard 1968 Specified In National Uniform Vehicle Code 1971 First Asabe Standard Ratified By American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Became Occupation Safety And Health Act (OSHA) Regulation. Ohio Farm And Home Safety Committee Provided Leadership
In Achieving Acceptance Dedicated 1992

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Public Domain
FMC Sterilizer
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Food ProcessingEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1920FPSD manufacturing plantMaderaState: CACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/fmc-sterilizer-27.aspxCreator: Thompson, Albert R.

The Food Canning Industry Was Revolutionized In 1920, When The Continuous Rotary Pressure Sterilizer Was Introduced By Albert R. Thompson. Thompson Was Chief Engineer For The Anderson-Barngrover Co. Of San Jose, California, Now The FMC Corporation. The Sterilizer Cooked Canned Products Uniformly Under Pressure For Short Period At High Temperatures, Then Quickly Cooled Them Under Pressure To Prevent Swelling Or Bursting. It Operated Continuously At Speeds Of Up To 400 Cans Per Minute.

YearAdded:
1992
Image Caption: The FMC Rotary Pressure Sterilizer
Corn Silage Harvester
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1892Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering BuildingFalcon HeightsState: MNZip: 55108Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/corn-silage-harvester-26.aspx

Charles C. Fenno Of Grinnell, Ia, Patented The First Field Corn Silage Harvester On April 19, 1892. His Ground-Powered Machine Cut The Corn Plant And Fed The Tassel End First To A Rotary Cutter. Joseph Weigel Of Flandreau, Sd, Improved Fenno's Harvester In 1912 By Adding An Engine To Power The Cutter And By Feeding The Stalks Butt End First. Andrean And Adolph Ronning, Farmers Of Boyd, Mn Patented Further Improvements In 1915. In 1918 The American Harvester Co. Of Minneapolis, Mn, Began Manufacturing The Horse-Drawn Ronning Harvester Using Weigel's Patent Too.

YearAdded:
1992
Corliss steam engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 19641300 Frenchtown RdEast GreenwichState: RIZip: 02818Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-steam/-164-new-england-wireless-and-steam-museum, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/311b4c58-18b4-4842-9f8b-18a866e6ad13/164-New-England-Wireless-and-Steam-Museum.aspxCreator: Merriam, Robert

Stationary steam engines, once the prime movers of industry, powered trains, ships, and mills in an age when there was no electric power. By the 19th century, American industry, especially in England, was rapidly outgrowing the capacity of the ater power that had been its principal prime mover. The need for a new power source inspired an intense development of the steam engine, the work of inventors directed mainly at imporving fuel efficiency by reducing steam consumption. The leader in this effort was George H.

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/The-daffodil (CC BY-SA 4.0)Image Caption: Corliss steam engineEra_date_from: 1964
San Jacinto Monument
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1939 Ship ChannelHoustonState: TXZip: 77571Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/San-Jacinto-Monument/Creator: Finn, Alfred, Cummins, Robert

The San Jacinto Monument commemorates the decisive 1836 battle near the banks of the Buffalo Bayou and the San Jacinto River that allowed Texas to win independence from Mexico. It is the world's tallest monument, rising 15 feet higher than the Washington Monument.

In 1936, Daughters and Sons of the Republic of Texas led lobbying efforts to allocate funds for a monument that would mark the importance of the Battle of San Jacinto. Ground was broken on April 21, 1936 - 100 years to the day after the victorious battle.

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Diveofficer (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: San Jacinto MonumentEra_date_from: 1939
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalSub Category: CommunicationsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1904General Electic CompanySchenectadyState: NYZip: 12306Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Alexanderson_Radio_Alternator,_1904Creator: Alexanderson, Ernst
"The Alexanderson radio alternator was a high-power, radio-frequency source which provided reliable transoceanic radiotelegraph communication during and after World War I. Ernst F.W. Alexanderson (1878-1975), a General Electric engineer, designed radio alternators with a frequency range to 100 kHz and a power capability from 2 kW to 200 kW.
YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Alexanderson Radio AlternatorEra_date_from: 1904
Milwaukee River Flushing Station
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Solid WasteEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1888 RiverMilwaukeeState: WICountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/solid-waste/-166-milwaukee-river-flushing-station-%281888%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/759894e1-2be9-4a23-942b-2d2c272336a5/166-Milwaukee-River-Flushing-Station-1888.aspxCreator: Reynolds, Edwin, Edward P. Allis Company

This pump, designed by Edwin Reynolds (1831-1909) and built by the Edward P. Allis company, is the major component of one of the earliest water-pollution control systems. It was capable of pumping more than a half billion gallons of water a day, the highest-capacity pump in the world when installed. It still is used during the summer to pump water from Lake Michigan into the Milwaukee River upstream of the downtown area. This maintains a current in the lower portion of the river and greatly reduces the concentration of pollutants.

YearAdded:
1992
Image Caption: Milwaukee River Flushing StationEra_date_from: 1888
Old Mill in Nantucket
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Wind Power ProductionEra: 1700-1749DateCreated: 174650 Prospect StreetNantucketState: MACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/wind-power-production/-165-old-mill-in-nantucket-%281746%29Creator: Wilbur, Nathan

The Old Mill, a smock type of windmill, believed to be the oldest operating windmill in the United States. Most of its parts are original. This mill is the sole survivor of four that once stood along the range of hills west of the town of Nantucket. The long spar and wheel rotate the top of the mill and turn the sails into the wind. Inside, visitors can watch the gears as corn is ground into meal, producing about 5 bushels an hour. Documentation of the restoration of the windmill is located at the Nantucket Historical Association's Research Center.

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Hiroshi Okugawa (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Old Mill in NantucketEra_date_from: 1746
Hohokam Canal System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1000-1599DateCreated: 600 - 1450 ADPueblo Grande MuseumPhoenixState: AZZip: 85034Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Hohokam-Canal-System/Creator: Hohokam Indians

Developed by the Hohokam, a prehistoric group of Native Americans, the canal system in the Salt River Valley serviced more than 100,000 acres of mostly arid desert country in what is now southern Arizona. The prehistoric Hohokam constructed one of the largest and most sophisticated irrigation networks ever created using pre-industrial technology. 

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Dave Hogg (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: The Hohokam irrigation system included some 700 miles of canals.Era_date_from: 600
Duck Creek Aqueduct
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1846Whitewater CanalMetamoraState: INZip: 47030Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Duck-Creek-Aqueduct/Creator: Hutchens, Charles

The significance of the 15-mile Whitewater Canal was not in its ability to create a profit, but rather its effect on the economic growth of the Whitewater River Valley, considered the gateway to the interior of Indiana. Before the canal, travel was challenging. Most waterways in Indiana were only navigable by canoe, and the alternative - horse and wagon - was difficult, slow and expensive.  

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Duck Creek AqueductEra_date_from: 1846
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