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1994

Missouri River Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1920-1927ChamberlainState: SDZip: 57325Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Missouri-River-Bridges/Creator: Kirkham, John Edward

The Chamberlain is the only surviving bridge of the original five. The others were replaced as the river rose due to flood control dams put in place over time.

YearAdded:
1994
Image Caption: Members of the South Dakota Army National Guard’s 200th Engineer Company guide a raft on the Missouri River during a river crossing operation on June 11, 2016. The Chamberlain in the background is the only surviving bridge of the five. The others were replaced as the river expanded due to flood control dams.Era_date_from: 1920
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1954Steven F. Udvar-Hazy CenterChantillyState: VAZip: 20151Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-178-boeing-367-80-%281954%29-, http://files.asme.org/asmeorg/Communities/History/Landmarks/5506.pdfCreator: Boeing
The 367-80 is the prototype for most jet transports. Its success was due largely to its mechanical systems, including turbine engines with thrust reversers and noise suppressors, redundant hydraulic control systems, and an improved cabin-pressurization system. Honeycomb flap panels were introduced, along with a strong, lightweight structural design that controlled fatigue cracking. These led to several innovations in aircraft tooling and manufacturing techniques. The Dash-80 was the first commercial airliner economical enough to take the US airline industry off subsidy.
YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Boeing Dreamscape (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Prototype of the Boeing 707 and most jet transport systems, the Boeing 367-80 established economic feasibility of commercial air travel.Era_date_from: 1954
White Pass & Yukon Railroad
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1900WhitehorseState: YukonCountry: CanadaWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/white-pass-and-yukon-railroad/Creator: Brackett, George

Combining British financing, American engineering, and Canadian contracting, the White Pass and Yukon was the first major civil engineering project on the continent above the 60th degree of northern latitude. Completed in 27 months using only hand tools, black powder, and regional timber, the White Pass and Yukon rises almost 2,900 feet from sea level at the port of Skagway to the White Pass summit on the U.S.-Canada border in just 20 miles, accomplishing one of the steepest climbs of any railroad in the world.

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Klanda (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: White Pass & Yukon RailroadEra_date_from: 1900
Viaducto del Malleco
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1890Malleco RiverAraucaníState: MallecoCountry: ChileWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Viaducto-del-Malleco/Creator: Lastarria, Jose Victorino

The bridge is 408 meters long and weighed approximately 1,500 metric tons when built. Originally supported by four columns, two more were added in later years to support the weight of heavier rail cars.

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Rafael Retamal (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Viaducto del MallecoEra_date_from: 1890
Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1943Icarus WayAieState: HIZip: 96701Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Red-Hill-Underground-Fuel-Storage-Facility/Creator: U.S. Navy, Goodrich Tire Company

Conceived in the early years of World War II as a plan to bury four fuel containers horizontally in a hillside at the U.S. Navy facility at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, the Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility ultimately encompassed the design and construction of 20 vertical storage tanks - each large enough to contain a 20-story building - buried in the volcanic hillside and connected by tunnels to a harbor-side pumping station more than two-and-a-half miles away.

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Leslie Nelson (CC BY-SA 4.0)Image Caption: Above-ground fuel storage tanks at Pearl Harbor prior to the construction of Red Hill.Era_date_from: 1943
Newell Shredder
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Solid WasteEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1969Newell IndustriesSan AntonioState: TXCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/solid-waste/-179-newell-shredder-%281969%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/2c664309-172d-48d9-a822-5327e310a107/179-Newell-Shredder-1969.aspxCreator: Newell, Alton

This machine, designed by Alton S. Newell, efficiently reduced automobile bodies into scrap metal for recycling. A body was fed into the shredder at a controlled rate, and rotating hammers, driven by a 500-hp motor, shredded it into small pieces that were easily shipped. The process took about 10 minutes a car and used less energy than other shredding and crushing machines. 

YearAdded:
1994
Image Caption: Newell ShredderEra_date_from: 1969
Kavanagh Building
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1936Kavanagh BldgBuenos AiresCountry: ArgentinaWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Kavanagh-Building/Creator: Sánchez, Gregorio , Lagos, Ernesto

Built during the 1930s, when Argentina's economy was the tenth strongest in the world, the Kavanagh Building was one of the world's first reinforced concrete skyscrapers and for many years remained the tallest building in South America. Commissioned by Corina Kavanagh and designed by architect Sanchez Lago y De la Torre, the 31-story modernist structure juxtaposes five volumes in a triangular, stair-like configuration that served for many years as a representative symbol of modern Buenos Aires.

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Alex Proimos (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Kavanagh BuildingEra_date_from: 1936
Johnstown Incline
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1891601-799 Edgehill DrJohnstownState: PAZip: 15905Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/rail-transportation---2/-180-johnstown-incline-%281891%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/619cfbc4-d1bb-4a41-bf69-3edae36a39fe/180-Johnstown-Incline-1891.aspxCreator: Diescher, Samuel

This is one of several, similar inclines built in western Pennsylvania during the late 19th century. It was designed by Samuel Diescher (1839-1915) after the great flood of 1889, to provide an efficient means of transportation between Westmont and the Conemaugh Valley. (See also the Monogahela and Duquesne Inclines in Pittsburgh.)

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Jeremy Tenenbaum (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Johnstown InclineEra_date_from: 1891
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Food ProcessingEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 18928801 Citation RoadEssexState: MDZip: 21221Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/food-processing/-174-crown-cork-and-soda-filling-machine-%281892%29Creator: Painter, William
Although bottled carbonated beverages were popular by the 1880s, sealing the bottle was a constant problem. Most "stoppers" were of metal and intended for reuse. None sealed adequately, and contact with the cap often contaminated the drink. In 1892 (Feb 2), William Painter (1838-1906) patented a cheap, single-use metallic cap, crimped over a lip formed on the bottle neck and lined with a thin cork wafer that both formed a leakproof seal and separated drink and metal.
YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/KMJ (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Crown Cork and Soda Filling MachineEra_date_from: 1892
Colorado River Aqueduct
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1933-1941Fullerton
Parker Dam
State: CACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Colorado-River-Aqueduct/Creator: Weymouth, Frank E.

Stretching 242 miles from the Colorado River on the California-Arizona border to its final holding reservoir near Riverside, California, the Colorado River Aqueduct consists of more than 90 miles of tunnels, nearly 55 miles of cut-and-cover conduit, almost 30 miles of siphons, and five pumping stations. Supplying approximately 1.2 million acre-feet of water a year - more than a billion gallons a day - it helped make possible the phenomenal growth of Los Angeles, San Diego, and surrounding Southern California areas in the second half of the 20th century. 

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Chuck Coker (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Colorado River Aqueduct sinks into a tunnel underneath California State Highway 62Era_date_from: 1933
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