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2011

The USDA Small Watershed Program
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Drainage & WatershedEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1948USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service State OfficeStillwaterState: OKZip: 74074Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/the-usda-small-watershed-program-57.aspx

Since 1948, over 11,000 dams and associated conservation practices in more than 2,000 watershed projects encompassing 160 million acres in 47 states have been constructed as a part of the USDA Small Watershed Program. These projects have improved the quality of life and the environment in rural communities by protecting people's lives and property, conserving soil and water resources, reducing flooding, providing economic development, recreation, and water supplies, enhancing water quality, and improving wetlands and wildlife habitat.

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2011
Once-Over Mechanical Harvesting of Cucumbers
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: MechanizationEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1963Farrall Agricultural Engineering HallEast LansingState: MIZip: 48824Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/the-once-over-mechanical-harvesting-of-cucumbers-55.aspxCreator: Bill Stout

The concept of once-over mechanical, as opposed to multiple-pick hand or experimental multiple-pick machine harvesting, represented a major break-through in the practice of producing vine fruit such as pickling cucumbers.  In the 1950s the cost of hand harvesting was as high as 50% of the production cost.  Once-over mechanical harvesting, coupled with increasing plant population, reduced this cost to 25% thereby making production economically viable.

YearAdded:
2011
Image Caption: The concept represented a major break-through in the practice of producing vine fruit such as pickling cucumbers.
Anhydrous Ammonia Application Technology
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: ChemicalEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1932Delta Research and Extension CenterStonevilleState: MSZip: 38776Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/anhydrous-ammonia-application-technology-56.aspxCreator: Edwards, Felix, Smith, J. O., Andrews, W. B.

In 1932, J. O. Smith, Agricultural Engineer at Delta Branch Experiment Station in Stoneville, MS, attached a small anhydrous ammonia cylinder to a plow in such a manner that the NH3 was released in the soil.  The plow, a Georgia Stock, was pulled by a gray mule named Ike.  This was the first known use of anhydrous ammonia as a soil-applied crop fertilizer.  The crude apparatus and the anhydrous ammonia it applied provided a much needed source of nitrogen for the otherwise rich alluvial soils of the Mississippi Delta. 

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2011
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/thirteenofclubs (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Anhydrous Ammonia is one of the cheapest forms of nitrogen fertilizer available on the market. However because it is such a hazardous material and is difficult to apply, many farmers choose to hire third party businesses to store and apply the fertilizer.
airport of Getafe
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1911Getafe Air BaseGetafeCountry: SpainWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/uploadedFiles/About_AIAA/News_Room/GetafeHistoricSitePR.pdf

Getafe Airfield was the site of the world’s first successful rotorcraft flight, on January 17, 1923. Lieutenant Alejandro Gómez Spencer piloted a C.4 Autogiro designed and built by Juan de la Cierva, who tested a series of autogiros between 1920 and 1924 at the Getafe site. Cierva’s autogiros introduced important technologies and flight techniques that led to the development of helicopters and other rotary wing aircraft.

 

YearAdded:
2011
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Miguel303xm (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: Airplanes in the airport of Getafe, Getafe, Madrid
UTICA MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilEra: 1950sDateCreated: 1959400 Oriskany St WUticaState: NYCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/utica-memorail-auditorium/Creator: Zetlin, Lev

The roof system of this building, designed by Lev Zetlin and opened in 1960, was the first of its kind in the world. Before the mid-1950's, the use of long-span cable structures was generally limited to suspension bridges. The only other significant cable roof structure preceding the Utica Memorial Auditorium was the North Carolina State Fair Livestock Judging Pavilion, completed in 1953.

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2011
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1970-1979DateCreated: 1974-1982Lincoln LaboratoryLexingtonState: MAZip: 02493Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Real-Time_Speech_Communication_on_Packet_Networks,_1974_-_1982
In August 1974, the first real-time speech communication over a packet-switched network was demonstrated via ARPANET between MIT Lincoln Laboratory and USC Information Sciences Institute. By 1982, these technologies enabled Internet packet speech and conferencing linking terrestrial, packet radio, and satellite networks.
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2011
Era_date_from: 1974
Satellite
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1980-1989DateCreated: 1984NHK Science and Technology Research LaboratoriesTokyoCountry: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Direct_Broadcast_Satellite_Service,_1984Creator: NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation)

NHK began the world's first direct broadcast satellite service in May, 1984. This was the culmination of eighteen years of research that included the development of an inexpensive low-noise receiver and investigations of rain attenuation in the 12 GHz band. RRL, NASDA, TSCJ, Toshiba Corporation, General Electric Company, and NASA participated with NHK to make satellite broadcasting to the home a practical reality.

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2011
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Makro Freak (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: A modern parabolic satellite communications antenna at Erdfunkstelle RaistingEra_date_from: 1984
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricDateCreated: 1972Eel River Dalhousie Generating StationNorth ShannonvaleCountry: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Eel_River_High_Voltage_Direct_Current_Converter_StationCreator: Canadian General Electric, NB Power

Operating since 1972, Eel River, New Brunswick is home to the world's first commercial solid state High Voltage Direct Current converter station. This 320 MW interconnection facility, built by Canadian General Electric and NB Power, incorporates high current silicon solid state thyristors to convert alternating current from Hydro Quebec to direct current and back to alternating, allowing asynchronous, stable power transfers to serve New Brunswick's Power's customers.

YearAdded:
2011
Era_date_from: 1972
Discovery of Superconductivity
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricSub Category: ResearchEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1911Kamerlingh Onnes Building, Leiden UniversityLeidenCountry: NetherlandsWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Discovery_of_Superconductivity,_1911Creator: Onne, Heike Kamerlingh

On 8 April 1911, Professor Heike Kamerlingh Onnes and his collaborators, Cornelis Dorsman, Gerrit Jan Flim, and Gilles Holst, discovered superconductivity.   They observed that the resistance of mercury approached  "practically zero" as its temperature was lowered to 3 kelvins.  Today, superconductivity makes many electrical technologies possible,  including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and high-energy particle accelerators.

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2011
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Museum Boerhaave Image Caption: Today, superconductivity makes many electrical technologies possible, including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and high-energy particle accelerators.Era_date_from: 1911
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Frontiers of KnowledgeEra: 1970-1979DateCreated: 1970s UniversityStony BrookState: NYZip: 11794Country: USAWebsite: http://portal.acs.org/portal/acs/corg/content?__uuid=76a7f9e4-c2f5-40cc-8c9f-38996ee20049&_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=PP_SUPERARTICLE&node_id=606&sec_url_var=region1&use_sec=falseCreator: Lauterbur, Paul
In the early 1970s, American chemist Paul C. Lauterbur demonstrated that nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) could be used to generate images of macroscopic objects. In the years following, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been refined as a technique for the detailed resolution of internal structures. Lauterbur’s invention thus created a powerful diagnostic tool for the non-invasive examination of body tissues such as the brain, heart, and muscles. It allows for the early detection of cancer and other diseases.
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2011
Image Credit: Original Image: Courtesy of Flickr/Everyone's Idle (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: NMR and MRI: Applications in Chemistry and MedicineEra_date_from: 1970s
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