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53202

Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Environmental ControlEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1885507 East Michigan StreetMilwaukeeState: MIZip: 53202Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/244-multi-zone-automatic-temperature-controlCreator: Johnson, Warren

he Automatic Temperature Control System was named as a Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark in 2008. Warren S. Johnson came up with the idea for automatic temperature control while teaching at Normal School in Whitewater, Wisconsin in the 1880's. Originally, janitors would have to enter each classroom to determine if it was too hot or cold and then adjust the dampers in the basement accordingly. Johnson sought a way to end, or at least minimize the classroom interruptions of the janitors and increase the comfort level of the students.

YearAdded:
2008
Image Caption: Multi-Zone Automatic Temperature Control SystemEra_date_from: 1885
Marshall Building
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1906207 E. Buffalo StreetMilwaukeeState: WIZip: 53202Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Marshall-Building/Creator: Turner, Claude

Designed by Claude A. P. Turner, a pioneer of reinforced concrete construction, the Marshall Building was constructed originally in 1906 as a five-story building. In 1911 the sixth floor of the building was added as per Turner's original design. This building is the oldest extant example of Turner's "mushroom" flat-slab system which transformed the design and construction of reinforced-concrete floors worldwide.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy ASCEImage Caption: Marshall BuildingEra_date_from: 1906
Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, ElectricSub Category: SteamEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1918108 E Wells StreetMilwaukeeState: WIZip: 53202Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-steam/-42-east-wells-%28onieda%29-street-power-plant-%281918%29, http://sections.asme.org/milwaukee/history/4-pulverizedcoal.htmlCreator: Esser, Herman, Anderson, John
Formerly known as the Oneida Street Power Plant, this plant served from 1918 to 1920 as the pilot plant in the United States for the development and use of finely pulverized coal firing in the boilers of steam-electric power plants. The results of the Oneida experiences were major changes in boiler design and lower costs of power generation. Following the early years of central station electric development, experiments at Onieda Street resolved persisting inefficiencies at a time when coal was increasingly expensive and of poorer quality.
YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Image source:
Wisconsin Historical Society
Image Caption: East Wells Onieda Street Power PlantEra_date_from: 1918
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