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43210

Slow Moving Vehicle Emblem
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: VehiclesEra: 1960sDateCreated: 1963Agricultural Engineering Building AEColumbusState: OHZip: 43210Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/smv-28.aspxCreator: Harkness, Kenneth A.

Slow Moving Vehicle (SMV) Emblem Makes Significant Contributions To Agricultural And Highway Safety Worldwide. 1961- 63 Developed By Kenneth A. Harkness, Department Of Agricultural Engineering On The Ohio State University Campus. 1964 Became An ASAE Standard 1968 Specified In National Uniform Vehicle Code 1971 First Asabe Standard Ratified By American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Became Occupation Safety And Health Act (OSHA) Regulation. Ohio Farm And Home Safety Committee Provided Leadership
In Achieving Acceptance Dedicated 1992

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Public Domain
Slotted Inlet Ventilation
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: StorageEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1948Cornell UniversityColumbusState: OHZip: 43210Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/slotted-inlet-ventilation-37.aspxCreator: Millier, William F.

A Crucial Step In The Evolution Of Modern Animal Agriculture Was The Development Of Mechanical Ventilation Methods For Animal Housing. Air Inlets Are Pivotal To Good Ventilation. In 1948 William F. Millier, Working At Cornell University Under The Direction Of Professor Clesson Turner, Tested And Published The Concept Of The Slotted Inlet. Professor Turner And Others At Cornell University Subsequently Continued To Develop Slotted Inlet Systems And Systematize Design Methods.

YearAdded:
1988
Original USDA-ARS Experimental Watersheds
Society: ASABEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Drainage & WatershedEra: 1940sDateCreated: 1942Agricultural Engineering Building - Ohio State UniversityColumbusState: OHZip: 43210Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/original-usda-ars-experimental-watersheds-58.aspx, https://naldc.nal.usda.gov/download/12341/PDF

In the mid 1930's, the USDA Soil Conservation Service (SCS) realized the importance of hydrologic processes on agricultural fields and watersheds and determining their impact on soil erosion, floods, water resources, and the agricultural economy. In response, the SCS Hydrologic Division established experimental watersheds in Coshocton, Ohio, Hastings, Nebraska, and Riesel, Texas, and operated them until 1954 when the watersheds were transferred to the newly created Agricultural Research Service (ARS). 

YearAdded:
2013
Image Caption: Active experimental watersheds and rain gauges at the USDA‐
ARS Grassland, Soil and Water Research Laboratory near Riesel, Texas.
Laser Beam Automatic Grade-Control System
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: MechanizationEra: 1960sDateCreated: 1968Agricultural Engineering Building - Ohio State UniversityColumbusState: OHZip: 43210Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/laser-beam-automatic-grade-control-system-48.aspxCreator: Fouss, James

The first laser grade control was developed by agricultural engineers James Fouss and Norman Fausey of USDA's Agricultural Research Service at The Ohio State University in the mid-1960's. That system controlled the precise depth and grade of subsurface drains by regulating trenching and plow-type drainage machines. Photo cells mounted on the drainage machine automatically raised and lowered the digging device, keeping the cells centered on a laser beam set to the desired elevation and grade.

YearAdded:
2007
Image Caption: Electronic analog computer simulation of the laser‐beam auto‐
matic grade‐control system on the plow.
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1926Agricultural Engineering Building AE - Building 298ColumbusState: OHZip: 43210Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/ives-hall-1.aspx

In 1926, Ives Hall, the original Agricultural Engineering Building at The Ohio State University, Columbus, was designated as ASAE's first engineering landmark in honor of department founder and 18th president of ASAE Fredrick Walter Ives. Frederick W. Ives 1884 - 1924.

Ives Hall was on the corner of Neil and Woodruff Avenues from 1926 - 2002. This display has been constructed with brick from the original structure.

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