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Combustion Engineering Inc.

Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1930ABB Combustion EngineeringChattanoogaState: TNZip: 37402Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/-44-fusion-welded-test-boiler-drum-%281930%29Creator: Combustion Engineering Inc., Moses, A. J.
This fusion-welded drum, tested during 1930, was the first in a series tested at Combustion Engineering Inc. that led to the industrial acceptance of welding for the fabrication of boiler drums. Replacing riveting for steam power plants, electric arc fusion welding permitted increased efficiencies through higher working pressures and temperatures and fabrication of larger units of improved safety. Welding was then rapidly extended to fabrication using optimum alloys for pressure vessel and structural application. Papers published by A. J.
YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Image source: Engrailhistory.infoImage Caption: Fusion-welded Test Boiler DrumEra_date_from: 1930
Eddystone Station Unit #1
Society: ASMEMain Category: Electric, MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1960#1 Industrial HighwayEddystoneState: PAZip: 19013Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-steam/-226-eddystone-station-unit--1-%281960%29Creator: Combustion Engineering Inc., Westinghouse Electric

Operated by the Philadelphia Electric Company (PECO), now known as Exelon Corp., Eddystone Station Unit #1 is a 325 MW pulverized-coal-fired plant that pushed the technology of steam-electric generating plants. When built in 1960, engineers sought to make a more efficient plant using higher temperatures and pressures and larger machines. Previous experience at Philo 6 (Zanesville, Ohio, 1957) had demonstrated supercritical steam plants would work, so engineers pushed beyond that frontier to even larger machines and efficiencies.

YearAdded:
2003
Image Caption: Eddystone StationEra_date_from: 1960
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