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1894

The First Flaked Cereal
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1894Willard Public LibraryBattle CreekState: MIZip: 49017Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/the-first-flaked-cereal-52.aspxCreator: Kellogg, John Harvey

In 1894, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg and his brother, Will Keith (W.K.) Kellogg, were making a granola type cereal for their patients in the Battle Creek Sanitarium, a general health facility in Michigan. This granola cereal was made from wheat that was boiled, rolled into a sheet, toasted, and ground. They accidentally left a batch of boiled wheat stand overnight before passing it through the rolls. The individual grains were subsequently pressed into flakes which were toasted to form the first flaked cereal. Two years later, W.K. Kellogg made the first corn flakes.

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Public Domain
Union Station
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 18941820 Market Street
St. LouisState: MSCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Union-Station/Creator: Link, Theodore , Pegram, George

In the early 1900s, Union Station was the hub of passenger railroad traffic in the central United States. It was one of the first stations to serve as a centralized terminal for multiple railroad lines. It originally served 22 rail lines; 13 from the east and nine from the west.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Ron Reiring (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Union StationEra_date_from: 1894
Leavitt-Riedler Pumping Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1894Chestnut Hill Pumping StationBostonState: MAZip: 02167Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-2-leavitt-riedler-pumping-engine---%281894%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/434e19f3-4729-4fbe-a7dc-2437ea265f18/2_Leavitt_Riedler_Pumping_Engine_1894.aspxCreator: Leavitt, Erasmus Darwin

This machine is an unusual triple-expansion, three-crank rocker engine, which in its day was a high-capacity unit providing outstanding performance for the Boston Water Works Corporation. Designed by Erasmus Darwin Leavitt, Jr. (1836-1916), Engine No. 3 was installed in 1894 to a high-service pumping facility on the south side of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir in Brighton.

YearAdded:
1973
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Leavitt-Riedler Pumping EngineEra_date_from: 1894
Bunker Hill Covered Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1894Lyle CreekCatawba CountyState: NCCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Bunker-Hill-Covered-Bridge/Creator: Ramsour, Andy, Haupt, Herman

In 1894, Catawba County, North Carolina commissioners asked local landowners to build and maintain an 85-foot-long bridge across Lyles Creek. The community hired Andy L. Ramsour, who served as keeper of the Horseford covered bridge over the Catawba River in Hickory, North Carolina.

YearAdded:
2001
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Bunker Hill Covered BridgeEra_date_from: 1894
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