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Wilkinson Mill
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 181067 Roosevelt AvenuePawtucketState: RIZip: 02860Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/30-wilkinson-mill, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/30a934f4-2025-47f2-ae87-760d94fe33d3/30-Wilkinson-Mill.aspxCreator: Wilkinson, David , Wilkinson, Oziel

The Wilkinson Mill, situated on the west bank of the Blackstone River in Pawtucket, was built between 1810 and 1811 by machinist Oziel Wilkinson. Constructed in stone rubble, three and one-half stories high, the mill played a critical role in the history of textile technology, in steam power generation, and in the development of the machine tools industry.

 

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/H.C. Williams (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Wilkinson MillEra_date_from: 1810
Watkins Woolen Mill
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1868Watkins Woolen Mill State ParkKearneyState: MOZip: 64060Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/-43-watkins-woolen-mill-%281868%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/705d5611-da21-47b3-b584-1e33e1c0b9df/43-Watkins-Woolen-Mill.aspxCreator: Watkins, Waltus

The Watkins Woolen Mill is among the best preserved examples of a Midwest woolen mill in nineteenth-century United States. Its machinery for preparing, spinning, and weaving wool reflects the existence of well-established textile industry in the country. It was designed and built by Waltus L. Watkins (1806-1884), a machinist and master weaver from Frankfort, Kentucky, who began operating his mill in 1861 in Clay County.

YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Watkins Woolen MillEra_date_from: 1868
Reed Gold Mine Ten-Stamp Mill
Society: SME (mining)Main Category: MiningSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895Reed Gold Mine Historic SiteMidlandState: NCZip: 28107Country: USAWebsite: http://www.smenet.org/Creator: Mecklenburg Iron Works

The first authenticated discovery of gold in the U.S. occurred on the Cabarrus County farm of John Reed in 1799, sparking the nation's first gold rush. During its peak years, more than a million dollars of gold was recovered a year, making North Carolina a leader in gold production until 1848. This mill, built by the Mecklenburg Iron Works of Charlotte, North Carolina, is original except for the timber work. Two groups of five 750-pound stamps with 5- to 7-inch lift, rose and fell thirty-five times a minute to yield a finely crushed ore.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Photo Courtesy of North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.Image Caption: The Stamp Mill at the Reed Gold Mine in Midland, NC.Era_date_from: 1895
Victoria Dutch Windmill
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Wind Power ProductionEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1944Memorial ParkVictoriaState: TXZip: 77901Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/wind-power-production/-151-victoria-dutch-windmill-%281840s%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/34e19ef6-403f-4bb4-8a57-92c17d01716e/151-Victoria-Dutch-Windmill-1840s.aspxCreator: Meiss, Fred , Fiek, Otto

This is an old technology brought here by new immigrants. It represents the beginning of modern life in a hard wilderness. This wind-powered gristmill was built in 1870 by Fred Meiss, Jr., and Otto Fiek near Spring Creek, from parts of the first windmill in the new state of Texas, erected by E.G. Witte. The millstones are the ones Witte imported from Europe and are believed to be one of the earliest sets in the United States to survive.

YearAdded:
1991
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Larry D. Moore (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: German RocketEra_date_from: 1944
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Food ProcessingEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1852Salt CreekOak BrookState: ILCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/food-processing/-64-graue-mill-%281852%29Creator: Graue, Friedrich , Asche, William
Designed and built by Fred Graue, a German immigrant, together with William Asche, the Old Graue Mill began operating around 1852 and served the village of Brush Hill (Hinsdale) until World War I. Its undershot waterwheel, wooden gearing system, belt power transmission, bucket elevators, and related bolters and sifters were representative of an ancient technology that began with Roman engineer Vitruvius. It ground wheat, corn, oats, and buckwheat in an era that was on the threshold of the Industrial Revolution.
YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Public Domain (Historic American Buildings Survey)Image Caption: Graue MillEra_date_from: 1852
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: ca. 181010017 Colvin Run RoadGreat FallsState: VACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---2/-214-colvin-run-mill-%28ca--1810%29Creator: Unknown
Colvin Run Mill is an early 19th century operating gristmill, closely modeled on the principles developed by Oliver Evans (1755-1819). Powered by a waterwheel, the restored mill was probably built on or after 1811 on the site of an older mill. Originally, the site was the property of George Washington, who identified it as ideal for a mill site. The first verifiable documentation of gristmill business was made by Philip Carter, who purchased a 90-acre property about 1811 from William Sheppard, who probably built the original mill based on Evans' design.
YearAdded:
2001
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Fairfax County Chamber of Commerce (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Colvin Run MillEra_date_from: ca. 1810
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