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Agricultural & Biological

Slow Moving Vehicle Emblem
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: VehiclesEra: 1960sDateCreated: 1963Agricultural Engineering Building AEColumbusState: OHZip: 43210Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/smv-28.aspxCreator: Harkness, Kenneth A.

Slow Moving Vehicle (SMV) Emblem Makes Significant Contributions To Agricultural And Highway Safety Worldwide. 1961- 63 Developed By Kenneth A. Harkness, Department Of Agricultural Engineering On The Ohio State University Campus. 1964 Became An ASAE Standard 1968 Specified In National Uniform Vehicle Code 1971 First Asabe Standard Ratified By American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Became Occupation Safety And Health Act (OSHA) Regulation. Ohio Farm And Home Safety Committee Provided Leadership
In Achieving Acceptance Dedicated 1992

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Public Domain
Slotted Inlet Ventilation
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: StorageEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1948Cornell UniversityColumbusState: OHZip: 43210Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/slotted-inlet-ventilation-37.aspxCreator: Millier, William F.

A Crucial Step In The Evolution Of Modern Animal Agriculture Was The Development Of Mechanical Ventilation Methods For Animal Housing. Air Inlets Are Pivotal To Good Ventilation. In 1948 William F. Millier, Working At Cornell University Under The Direction Of Professor Clesson Turner, Tested And Published The Concept Of The Slotted Inlet. Professor Turner And Others At Cornell University Subsequently Continued To Develop Slotted Inlet Systems And Systematize Design Methods.

YearAdded:
1988
Skid Steer Loader
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: MechanizationEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1957Bonanzaville Historic MuseumWest FargoState: NDZip: 58078Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/skid-steer-loader-43.aspxCreator: Keller, Cyril and Louis

Brothers Cyril and Louis Keller designed and built the first small, lightweight, three-wheel, front-end loader in their machinist-blacksmith shop in Rothsay, Minnesota. A local farmer wanted to mechanize cleaning manure from his obstacle-filled, two-story turkey barn. The machine, first used in 1957, was able to turn completely around within its own length. Melroe Manufacturing Company, Gwinner, ND purchased the rights to the Keller loader and hired the Kellers to continue development of the loader in 1958.

YearAdded:
2004
Image Credit: Courtesy WikiCommons/Tennen-Gas (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: A modern skid steer loader, Toyota Jobsun 4SDK6 model
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1880sDateCreated: 1885John Deere Des Moines WorksAnkenyState: IAZip: 50023Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/shielded-snapping-rolls-for-corn-harvesting-36.aspx

In 1850, E. W. Quincy of Illinois patented an open-roll ear-snapping mechanism. A series of innovations led to corn heads for combines. Harvesting corn with corn pickers using open rolls on corn pickers after 1925 proved to be dangerous as farmers often needed to clear stalks from the rolls. In 1885, E. M. Aiken, Dawson, ND, patented shielded snapping rolls with flat plates above the rolls. C. K Shedd and E. V. Collins, Ames, IA, patented a more aggressive shielded snapping device in 1941 which was later used on sweet corn pickers.

YearAdded:
1998
Self-Leveling Control for Hillside Combine
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: MechanizationEra: 1940sDateCreated: 1945Hanson IndustriesSpokane ValleyState: WAZip: 99216Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/self-leveling-control-for-hillside-combine-50.aspxCreator: Hanson, Raymond A.

In 1941, near Palouse, Washington, Raymond A. Hanson conceived of a self-leveling mechanism for hillside combines. On the steep hills in the Pacific Northwest, leveling is necessary to save grain because of the gravity grain separation mechanism. Before the Hanson invention, manual leveling required a person to stand on the combine platform and adjust the machine to the lay of the land - a hot, tedious job. The grain-saving attributes of Hanson's invention were probably more important than the labor saving, although both were valuable.

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Scoty6776 (CC BY 3.0)Image Caption: A 2011 AGCO Gleaner S77 Tritura combine demonstrates its hillside self-leveling technology
Scoates Hall, TAM
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: EducationScoates HallCollege StationState: TXZip: 77840Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/scoates-hall-9.aspxCreator: Scoates, Daniels

Scoates Hall 1932 A Historic Landmark of Agricultural Engineering Named for Daniels Scoates Designer of this Building Professor and Head Department of Agricultural Engineering 1919 to 1939 Eleventh President of ASAE Teacher, Writer, Engineer Counselor to Youth, His Example Still Inspires. Dedicated by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers 1978

YearAdded:
1978
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Ronw526 (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Scoates Hall, part of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University.
Rumely OilPull Tractor
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1910La Porte HospitalLa PorteState: INZip: 46350Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/rumley-oilpull-42.aspx

The Rumely Companies, which operated in La Porte, Indiana, from 1853 to 1931, produced a variety of equipment including threshers and steam engines, which helped to change the nature of American and world agriculture. The revolutionary OilPull Tractor, which was introduced in 1910, used a unique carburetion system developed by John Secor, the Company's Chief Engineer. The OilPull tractor efficiently converted a low cost petroleum product to mechanical power, greatly reducing the need for animal and steam power on American farms. Dr.

YearAdded:
2003
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/BulldozerD11 (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Rubber Tractor Tires
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: VehiclesEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1926Orange County Historical SocietyOrangeState: VAZip: 22960Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/rubber-tractor-tires-34.aspxCreator: Pounds, Hoyle, Allis-Chalmers Company, Roorda, Hessel

Early tractors were massive and expensive. Their steel lug wheels gave poor traction and a rough ride. Lugs were prohibited on many roads. 1926 Hoyle Pounds modified a Fordson tractor with zero pressure truck tires on special rims to improve performance on sandy soils in Winter Garden, FL.

A successful business resulted. In 1929 Hessel Roorda equipped Farmall tractors with low pressure rubber tires to pick corn in muddy fields near Rock Valley, IA. Farmers found they performed well in all conditions.

YearAdded:
1995
Image Caption: A modern rubber tractor tire
Roll Over Protection Structure (ROPS)
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: VehiclesEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1956John Deere Product Engineering CenterCedar FallsState: IAZip: 50613Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/rops-21.aspx

The First Agricultural Tractor Roll-Over Protection Structure (Rops) In The USA Resulted From Research By Lloyd H. Lamouria, Ralph R. Parks And Coby Lorensen At The Agricultural Engineering Department Of The University Of California At Davis. It Was Designed And Successfully Tested In The Summer Of 1956. It Was Exhibited And Reported At The Annual Meeting Of The Pacific Coast Section Of The American Society Of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE) In December 1956. Warren I. Hanson, Safety Coordinator, N.

YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/BulldozerD11 (CC BY 3.0)Image Caption: Ford Tractor with fitted ROPS bar
Rain Bird Impact Drive Sprinkler Head
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1933Rain Bird corporate officeAzusaState: CAZip: 91702Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/rain-bird-sprinkler-head-24.aspxCreator: Englehardt, Orton

The Rain Bird horizontal action impact drive sprinkler head was invented in 1933 by Orton Englehardt, a citrus grower and native of Glendora. The design offered slow rotation and uniform watering, benefits long sought by local irrigators. Clement M. LaFetra, a friend of Englehardt, urged early patent application. A patent was awarded on December 18, 1933. Englehardt, with no entrepreneurial aspirations, assigned all rights to LaFetra and his wife Mary Elizabeth. Production began in the LaFetra family barn on October 13, 1935.

YearAdded:
1990
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