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1930s

The Circular, Corrugated, Galvinized Steel Grain Bins
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: StorageEra: 1930sBiological and Agricultural Engineering Department, Kansas State UniversityManhattanState: KSZip: 66506Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/circular,-corrugated,-galvanized-steel-grain-bins-54.aspxCreator: Fenton, F. C.

Prior to the development of circular, corrugated, galvanized steel grain bins, prefabricated, non-corrugated steel bins were used because of cost, portability, rodent resistance and waterproof features, but bin capacity was limited.  In the 1920's, corrugated bins, which were larger in size and could support greater loads, were developed and became commercially available.  In the 1930's, research programs advanced their use, notably research by F. C. Fenton at Kansas State College of Agriculture and Applied Science and T. E.

YearAdded:
2009
Soil Compaction Criteria
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: SoilEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1933National Soil Dynamics LaboratoryAuburnState: ALZip: 36832Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/soil-compaction-criteria-25.aspxCreator: Nichols, Dr. Mark L.

Historically, Farm Tillage Tools Were Designed Without Scientific Knowledge Of How Tools Work The Soil. Thus, A Tool Designed To Operate In One Soil Pulled By A Mule Might Not Operate Satisfactorily In Another Soil Or When Pulled By A Tractor At Higher Speeds. Traction And Flotation Problems Appeared With The Introduction Of Tractors. The Importance Of Developing A Scientific Approach To The Study Of Tillage And Traction Became Apparent During The Transition From Animal To Mechanical Power.

YearAdded:
1990
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Blonder1984 (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Soil compaction
New Holland Baler
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: MechanizationEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1937508 W Main StNew HollandState: PAZip: 17557Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/new-holland-baler-11.aspx

This machine is the world's first successful automatic pickup, self-tying hay baler. Its invention was a significant contribution to the development of American Agriculture. The baler was invented and hand-built in 1937 at Farmersville, Pa., a few miles from here. After testing and improvement, some production models were made at Kinzers, Pa. Balers of this type were first mass-produced in 1940 by the New Holland Machine Company. Dedicated by American Society of Agricultural Engineers 1976

YearAdded:
1976
Massey-Harris #20 Combine
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1938Ford MuseumDearbornState: MIZip: 48124Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/massey-harris-20-combine-15.aspx, https://www.thehenryford.org/collections-and-research/digital-collections/artifact/18684/#slide=gs-274942Creator: Carroll, Thomas

Designated A Historic Landmark Of Agricultural Engineering The Massey-Harris No. 20 was the First Commercially- Successful Self-Propelled Combine Used to Harvest Small Grains Under a Wide Variety of Conditions, World-Wide. Engineered By Thomas Carroll, Chief Engineer, Aided by Robert Ashton and Albert Luke, Principal Assistants, it was First Marketed in 1938 by the Massey-Harris Company. This Combine Opened a New Era an Farm Mechanization and Revolutionized the Grain Harvesting Process. Forty-Four Years Later, This Same Harvesting Principle Continues to be Used Throughout the World.

YearAdded:
1982
Image Caption: Combine pictured at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI
Hume-Love Cutterbar and Reel
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1930Horn School Rest AreaRosaliaState: WAZip: 99170Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/hume-love-cutterbar-29.aspxCreator: Hume, Horace D.

Near This Location In The 1930's James E. Love And Horace D. Hume Of Garfield, Washington, Invented The Flexible Floating Cutterbar And The Tined Pickup Reel To Harvest Low-Growing, Fragile Crops. These Devices Were Developed For The Local Crops Of Dry Peas And Lentils And Were Then Adopted Nationwide To Soybeans And Other Low-Growing Crops That Tangle And Lodge. These Mechanisms Reduced Dry Pea Harvesting Costs By 28% And Crop Loss From 50 To 10%. These Inventions Were Reported To Save The Equivalent Of 2,750,000 Acres Of Soybeans Annually.

YearAdded:
1993
Graham-Hoeme Chisel Plow
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, TillageEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1933HookerState: OKZip: 73945Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/graham-hoeme-chisel-plow-38.aspxCreator: Hoeme, Fred

Preventing Wind Erosion Was The Primary Objective Of Fred Hoeme, a Hooker, Oklahoma Farmer, When He Developed A Heavy-Duty Chisel Plow In 1933. Hoeme And His Sons Manufactured And Sold About 2000 Plows From Their Farmstead. In 1938, W. T. Graham Purchased The Manufacturing And Distribution Rights And Established Manufacturing In Amarillo, Texas. The Graham-Hoeme Plow, Marketed As "The Plow To Save The Plains", Was Sold Worldwide.

YearAdded:
2000
Image Caption: Graham-Hoeme Chisel Plow was the forerunner for a variety of modern chisel plow designs, such as this one.
Part of the Purdue Cirrus training fleet on the ramp
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: EducationEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1930Purdue University AirportWest LafayettaState: INCountry: USAWebsite: https://engineering.purdue.edu/AAE/aboutus/history/gallery/Z-AIAAHistoryofAAE.pdf, https://engineering.purdue.edu/aiaa/, https://www.aiaa.org/HistoricAerospaceSites/

The Purdue University Airport was the first collegiate owned airport in the United States. It hosted Amelia Earhart for her final adventure, was the training ground for test pilots such a Jimmy Johnson and Ivan Kincheloe, balloonist Malcolm Ross, and astronaut Neil Armstrong. Purdue University Airport and its people and programs pushed aviation’s evolution to new heights and helped expand the frontiers of flight. During WWII, hundreds of U.S. Army and Navy members were trained at the airport.

Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/SkyHigh757 (CC BY-SA 4.0)Image Caption: Part of the Purdue Cirrus training fleet on the ramp
James Hart Wyld
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Frontiers of KnowledgeEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1930sDenvilleState: NJCountry: USAWebsite: https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/book/10.2514/4.104428Creator: Wyld, James Hart, Lovell Lawrence, Pendray, George Edward, Pierce, Hugh, Shesta, John

The first company in the United States dedicated solely to the production of the liquid rocket engine, Reaction Motors, Inc. (RMI) was formed in 1941.  Its four founders were rocket enthusiasts and members of the American Rocket Society. RMI developed the rocket motors that powered the first supersonic flight, that of the X-1; the retro rockets for five NASA surveyor lunar soft landers; and prepackaged liquid rocket engines for the U.S. Navy Bullpup A & B air to ground missiles, among many other pioneering programs.

YearAdded:
2004
Image Credit: Courtesy Smithsonian InstitutionImage Caption: James Wyld, one of the RMI founders, holding a rocket motor at an ARS test in Midvale, New Jersey, 1941.
Hobby 1940 Air Terminal
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1930sWilliam P. Hobby AirportHoustonState: TXCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.aiaahouston.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Horizons_2013_01_and_02_pg_26_The_1940_Air_Terminal.pdfCreator: Joseph Finger

The 1940 Air Terminal is a beautiful and rare example of classic art deco airport architecture from the golden age of flight. Designed by noted architect Joseph Finger, the Terminal was built to meet Houston’s growing role as a major center for air commerce in the 1930s. Its grand opening by the City of Houston took place on September 28, 1940, at Houston Municipal Airport, now known as Hobby Airport.

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Mlickliter (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: The 1940 Air Terminal Museum
Bell Aircraft Corporation's main factory
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1935Calspan Flight Research CenterNiagara FallsState: NYCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/Secondary.aspx?id=14063Creator: Bell, Lawrence Dale “Larry”

Bell Aircraft, founded in 1935 by Lawrence Dale “Larry” Bell, based its primary manufacturing facility in Wheatfield, New York, where several important aircraft were designed and produced. During the World War II era, the plant produced the P-39 Airacobra and the P-63 Kingcobra fighters. The P-39 was used to great effect by the Soviet Air Force, with the highest number of individual kills recorded by any U.S.-produced fighter aircraft during the war. The plant also designed and manufactured the P-59A Airacomet, the first U.S.

YearAdded:
2012
Image Caption: Bell Aircraft Corporation's main factory in Wheatfield, NY (Buffalo / Niagara Falls) during the 1940s. This unit primarily produced the Bell P-39 Airacobra and P-63 Kingcobra.
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