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Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalEra: 1970-1979DateCreated: 19691500 N. McClintock Dr.TempeState: AZZip: 85281Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/252-big-surf-waterpark, https://www.asme.org/wwwasmeorg/media/ResourceFiles/AboutASME/Who%20We%20Are/Engineering%20History/Landmarks/252-Big-Surf-Waterpark.pdf, http://bigsurffun.com/Creator: Dexter, Phil

The first wave pool in North America to consistently generate 3-5 foot spilling waves suitable for surfing

Big Surf Waterpark uses 15 gates that empty water into a 2.5 acre lagoon with contours that replicate a natural beach. Waves are produced by pumping water to a pre-selected height and released through underwater gates. The water released breaks over a baffle (similar to a natural reef), forming one wave per cycle. Water is recirculated to the lagoon through pumps.

YearAdded:
2013
Image Caption: Designed by Phil Dexter, the facility uses 15 gates that empty water from a reservoir into a 2.5 million gallon lagoon with contours that replicate a natural beach.
Theodore Roosevelt Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1911Theodore Roosevelt DamTonto National ForestState: AZZip: 85545Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Theodore-Roosevelt-Dam---Salt-River-Project/

The first electric power generated by the Theodore Roosevelt Dam for commercial use was transmitted over a high-voltage line to Phoenix, where it was employed to operate the city's new streetcar system. 

YearAdded:
1970
Image Credit: Courtesy Bureau of Reclamation (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Theodore Roosevelt DamEra_date_from: 1911
Navajo Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1929Marble CanyonPageState: AZZip: 86036Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Navajo-Bridge/Creator: Arizona Highway Department

Navajo Bridge spans Marble Canyon, 470 feet above the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. It was considered the highest steel arch bridge in America when completed.

The Navajo Bridge (also known as the Grand Canyon Bridge) was built in 1929 by the Arizona Highway Department and provided a vital transportation link over the Grand Canyon between northern Arizona and southern Utah. Construction commenced by building on one side of the canyon, then on the other, until the two sides met in the middle.

YearAdded:
1997
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Frank Kovalchek (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Navajo BridgeEra_date_from: 1929
Hoover Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1935Colorado RiverBoulder CityState: AZZip: 86443Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Hoover-Dam/Creator: Six Companies, Inc., Davis, Arthur

In 1918, the U.S. Reclamation Service's director and chief engineer Arthur P. Davis proposed a dam of unprecedented height to control the devastating floods on the Colorado River, generate hydroelectric power, and store the river's ample waters for irrigation and other uses.

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Courtesy of Flickr/JoshBerglund19 (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Hoover DamEra_date_from: 1935
Hohokam Canal System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1000-1599DateCreated: 600 - 1450 ADPueblo Grande MuseumPhoenixState: AZZip: 85034Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Hohokam-Canal-System/Creator: Hohokam Indians

Developed by the Hohokam, a prehistoric group of Native Americans, the canal system in the Salt River Valley serviced more than 100,000 acres of mostly arid desert country in what is now southern Arizona. The prehistoric Hohokam constructed one of the largest and most sophisticated irrigation networks ever created using pre-industrial technology. 

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Dave Hogg (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: The Hohokam irrigation system included some 700 miles of canals.Era_date_from: 600
Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, ElectricSub Category: WaterEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1909PhoenixState: AZCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-water/-13-childs-irving-hydroelectric-project-%281909%29Creator: Turner, Lew
Fossil Creek meanders ten miles to the Verde River, dropping some 1,600 feet during its course and, at the turn of the century, enticed miners in the copper-rich Irving area to use a new technology -- hydroelectric power. A seven-mile series of flumes brings the water from a dam below Fossil Spring to the Irving Plant and then to Stehr Lake.
YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Original Image: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Childs-Irving Hydroelectric ProjectEra_date_from: 1909
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