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Aerospace

captured Focke Wulf Fw 190A-3 at the Royal Aircraft Establishment
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1900sDateCreated: 1905Country: UK

Farnborough's aeronautical history began in 1905 with the arrival of HM Balloon Factory in 1905, headed by Lt Col J.L.B. Templer. In 1908, the first powered aeroplane flight in Great Britain took place here, piloted by Samuel Cody. In 1912, Lord Trenchard established the first headquarters of the Royal Flying Corps and in 1918 the Royal Aircraft Establishment was founded.

YearAdded:
2004
Image Caption: A captured Focke Wulf Fw 190A-3 at the Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough, with the RAE's chief test pilot, Wing Commander H J "Willie" Wilson at the controls, August 1942.
Rocketdyne's_test_stand_for_testing_the_J-2_engine_in_Santa_Susana_Mountains
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1950sDateCreated: 1947Santa Susana Field LaboratoryBrandeisState: CACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/HistoricAerospaceSites/

On 15 November 1950, the SSFL conducted its first official test with a Rocketdyne-designed XLR43-NA-1 large liquid propellant rocket engine, which later became the Redstone engine.  Encompassing 2558 acres, 18 large static test stands, 5 component test laboratories and an advanced test facility, the SSFL and its dedicated employees have provided significant contributions to U.S. rocketry and space programs for over 50 years.

YearAdded:
2001
Image Caption: Rocketdyne's test stand for testing the J-2 engine in Santa Susana Mountains, 1963
 Dr. Robert H. Goddard and a liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket at Auburn, Massachusetts.
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 192620 Upland StreetAuburnState: MACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/uploadedFiles/Education_and_Careers/STEM_K-12_Outreach/Kids_Place/Rockets_Activities/Pop%20Rockets%20Activity%5B1%5D.pdfCreator: Goddard, Dr. Robert H.

On March 16, 1926 Dr. Robert H. Goddard, also known as "the father of modern rocketry," launched the world’s first liquid propellant rocket from a point 1000 feet S.S.E. of the plaque on the property of the Asa M. Ward Family.  Erected by the American Rocket Society July 13, 1960 in recognition of this significant achievement in the evolution of astronautics.

YearAdded:
2000
Image Caption: Dr. Robert H. Goddard and a liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket at Auburn, Massachusetts
NASA’s Stennis Space Center.
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1960sDateCreated: 19611100 Belch BoulevardState: MSCountry: USAWebsite: https://images.nasa.gov/details-SSC-20080410-S00695H.html

This rocket propulsion test complex was created to flight-certify all first and second stages of the Apollo Saturn V rocket.  The first test-firing occurred on April 23, 1966. Subsequent to the Apollo Program, these test stands were modified to support the testing requirements of the Space Shuttle Main Engine.  Every astronaut who traveled to the moon aboard Saturn V Rockets and into space aboard the Space Shuttle, did so on rocket stages and engines that were first proven flight-worthy on these test stands.

YearAdded:
2007
Image Caption: J-2X Engine No. 10002 is test fired for the final time on the A-1 test stand at NASA’s Stennis Space Center.
Point Mugu Aerial
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1946Point Mugu Naval Air StationState: CACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/

Established in 1946 to provide a comprehensive test and evaluation site for tactical missiles, Point Mugu has been instrumental in the development, test, evaluation and in-service support of systems including Regulus, Sparrow, Phoenix, Bullpup, Harpoon, SLAM, Tomahawk, Standard, and Rolling Airframe Missile. The first missile launch from an operational submarine was also accomplished at Pt. Mugu.

YearAdded:
2003
Image Caption: Aerial view of Naval Air Station Point Mugu — at Naval Base Ventura County, California, 2008
First Aerojet Manufacturing Site
Main Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1940-1949285 W Colorado BlvdPasadenaState: CAZip: 91105Country: USAWebsite: https://info.aiaa.org/tac/ETMG/HISTC/Shared%20Documents/Historic%20Aerospace%20Sites%20(HAS)/Procedures%20and%20templates/Sites-by-state-plaque-wording.docCreator: Von Karman, Theodore

On Colorado Blvd in Pasadena in 1942, the Aerojet Engineering Company founded the first manufacturing facility for the production of rocket propulsion systems. This site was selected to be honored by AIAA because of its significance as one of the first production sites for rocket motors, laying part of the foundation for the rocket business. Production was done under the leadership of Aerojet's first president, Dr. Theodore von Karman, world-renowned scientist and engineer from the California Institute of Technology. The plant remained here until 1945.

YearAdded:
2000
Image Caption: The original Aerojet manufacturing facility no longer exists. Early rockets produced by Aerojet included the Aerobee Hi rocket, flown in 1946 to an altitude of 37 miles. It is on display and test fired the first complete Aerobee from the White Sands Proving Grounds in New Mexico in 1947. It reached an altitude of 34.7 miles.
Pegasus 3 Engine BS 916
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1993Rolls Royce PLC
BristolState: BCZip: BS34 7QECountry: UKWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/--168-pegasus-3-engine-bs-916-%281960%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/f2e04cf6-f24f-4633-bb2f-ef61c5deb500/168-Pegasus-3-Engine-BS-916.aspxCreator: Bristol Aero-Engines Ltd. (now part of Rolls-Royce), Hooker, Stanley

The Pegasus 3 is the earliest surviving example of the prototype engine for vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) jets, namely the Royal Air Force's Harriers and US Marine Corps' AV-8Bs. Owned by the Rolls- Royce Heritage Trust (a company-sponsored history and preservation society), the artifact is an early developmental model of the Pegasus 3 engine, the first to fly with sufficient thrust to prove the vectored-thrust concept for V/STOL jet aircraft, in 1960.

YearAdded:
1993
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: The earliest surviving example of the prototype engine for vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) jets, namely Harriers and AV-8Bs.Era_date_from: 1993
RL-10 Rocket Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1958Smithsonian National Air and Space MuseumWashingtonState: DCZip: 20560Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-36-rl-10-rocket-engine-%281958%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/e04882e6-5b54-404f-b634-f7e4d4494067/36-RL-10-Rocket-Engine.aspxCreator: Pratt & Whitney

The RL-10, which served as the power plant for NASA's upper-stage Centaur space launch vehicle, was the first rocket engine to use high-energy liquid hydrogen as a fuel. It has provided precisely controlled, reliable power for lunar and planetary explorations. The RL-10 embodied numerous advanced design features, including multiple use of its fuel with the "bootstrap cycle." The RL-10 is also capable of multiple restarts in space, which enables positioning of satellites or further escape of Earth's gravity.

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Public Domain (NASA)Image Caption: The first rocket engine to use high-energy liquid hydrogen as fuel.Era_date_from: 1958
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1955Arnold Air Force BaseArnold AFBState: TNZip: 37389Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-140-arnold-afb-wind-tunnel-%281955%29Creator: Sverdrup, Lief
This propulsion wind tunnel (PWT) at Arnold AFB was the first large-scale facility for testing jet and rocket engines in simulated high-speed flight conditions. It has a unique combination of transonic (1955) and supersonic (1960) wind tunnels using a common 236,000 horsepower drive, the world's largest when built. It can achieve air speeds up to Mach 4.75 at altitudes up to 150,000 feet in its 16-foot square, removable test sections. Design engineers were Lief J. Sverdrup, John R. Parcel, Brice Smith, and Walter Cook, of Sverdrup and Parcel, St.
YearAdded:
1989
Image Credit: Public Domain (US Air Force)Image Caption: The world's first large-scale testing facility for jet and rocket engines in simulated high-speed flight conditionsEra_date_from: 1955
Hydromatic Propeller
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1938New England Air Museum
Bradley Intl. Airport
Windsor LocksState: CTZip: 06096Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-149-hydromatic-propeller-%28ca--1938%29, http://files.asme.org/ASMEORG/Communities/History/Landmarks/5572.pdfCreator: Hamilton Standard

Rapid development of aircraft design in the 1930s required many related innovations, including propeller design. The hydromatic propeller by Hamilton Standard marked a significant advance over the counterweight-type, controllable pitch propeller. The first test flight of the prototype took place in 1938: the public demonstration was made by a United Air Lines DC-3 over New York City on April 6, 1938. It played a distinguished role in allied combat aircraft in World War II.

YearAdded:
1990
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: An early example of propeller innovations, including variable-pitch control and feathering capability.Era_date_from: 1938
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