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1979

Hydraulic-Inclined Plane System of the Morris Canal
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1824-1836Phillipsburg to Newark BayState: NJCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/hydraulic-powered-inclined-plane-system-of-the-morris-canal/

Morris Canal was built to transport coal from the Lehigh Valley of Pennsylvania to industrial markets in Newark and New York. The total length of the canal was 106 miles. The canal climbed an astonishing 914 feet from Newark Bay to the summit at Lake Hopatcong, and then dropped 760 feet to the Delaware River at Phillipsburg. This gave the canal an average vertical slope of 18 feet per mile, steep compared to the contemporary Erie Canal's relatively gentle slope of one foot per mile.  

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Courtesy ASCEImage Caption: The Hydraulic-Inclined Plane System gave the Morris Canal an average vertical slope of 18 feet per mile. Era_date_from: 1824
Fink Through Truss Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1858HamdenState: NJZip: 08801Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Fink-Through-Truss-Bridge/

"Fink's truss design was one of a number of early patented solutions to [the problem of how] to carry a massive, moving weight (a train) over long spans (to avoid the expense of building piers and obstructing waterways) on easily erected bridges (often in rough terrain) with good long-term economy..." 
 - Kent Farnow Smith, "America's Oldest Functioning Iron-Truss Bridge," 1978

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Courtesy Library of CongressImage Caption: This bridge is an example of the Fink truss, the most efficient solution to building long-span bridges quickly and economically during its time.Era_date_from: 1858
RL-10 Rocket Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1958Smithsonian National Air and Space MuseumWashingtonState: DCZip: 20560Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-36-rl-10-rocket-engine-%281958%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/e04882e6-5b54-404f-b634-f7e4d4494067/36-RL-10-Rocket-Engine.aspxCreator: Pratt & Whitney

The RL-10, which served as the power plant for NASA's upper-stage Centaur space launch vehicle, was the first rocket engine to use high-energy liquid hydrogen as a fuel. It has provided precisely controlled, reliable power for lunar and planetary explorations. The RL-10 embodied numerous advanced design features, including multiple use of its fuel with the "bootstrap cycle." The RL-10 is also capable of multiple restarts in space, which enables positioning of satellites or further escape of Earth's gravity.

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Public Domain (NASA)Image Caption: The first rocket engine to use high-energy liquid hydrogen as fuel.Era_date_from: 1958
Rockville Stone Arch Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1902Susquehanna RiverMarysvilleState: PAZip: 17053Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Rockville-Stone-Arch-Bridge/

The third bridge built on the same site to carry railroad tracks across the Susquehanna River just north of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, the Rockville Stone Arch Bridge, at 3,820 feet long and 52 feet wide, is believed to be the longest and widest stone-arch railroad bridge in the world. A central link in rail travel between New York City and Pittsburgh, the Rockville Stone Arch Bridge accommodates four lines of railroad tracks, today serving both the Norfolk Southern and Amtrak lines.

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/John Mueller (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Rockville Stone Arch BridgeEra_date_from: 1902
Moffat Tunnel
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Tunnels, Water Supply & ControlEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1928Thru the Continental DivideNederlandState: COZip: 80466Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Moffat-Tunnel/Creator: Moffat, David , Moffat Tunnel Improvement District

Known as "the highest and lowest holing in history," the tunnel bored through the Rockies at an elevation of 9,200 feet, 2,800 feet below the surface. Eight hundred men worked around the clock for 3 1/2 years, moving 3 billion pounds of rock. 

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Bradley Gordon (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Moffat TunnelEra_date_from: 1928
Hacienda La Esperanza Sugar Mill Steam Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1861Conservation Trust of Puerto RicoManatíState: PRZip: 00617Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/mechanical-power-production-steam/-35-hacienda-la-esperanza-sugar-mill-steam-engine, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/60f1d4d5-215e-4334-8267-a40a7372288a/35_Hacienda_La_Esperanza_Sugar_Mill_Steam_Engine.aspxCreator: Watt, James , Newcomen, Thomas

The La Esperanza sugar mill steam engine is one of the few remaining American links to the pioneer beam engines of the English inventors Thomas Newcomen (1712) and James Watt (1769). The engine was built in 1861 in Cold Spring, New York, by the West Point Foundry. The general arrangement and details, including the Gothic embellishment, are typical of machinery of the period. The straight-line motion of the piston rod is accommodated to the arc of the moving beam end by a parallel motion. Watt regarded this ingenious linkage as the invention of which he was most proud.

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Hacienda La Esperanza Sugar Mill Steam EngineEra_date_from: 1861
Modified Fink trussed Girder bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1870Riverside ParkLynchburgState: VICountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Fink-Deck-Truss-Bridge/Creator: Fink, Albert

The Fink Deck Truss Bridge is thought to have been originally used on the Norfolk and Western mainline railway. It was moved to its present location and converted to a vehicular bridge over a railroad spur in 1893 when the Norfolk and Western mainline was moved. It was relocated again in 1985 to Lynchburg's Riverside Park to serve as a pedestrian bridge.

YearAdded:
1979
Image Caption: Modified Fink trussed Girder bridgeEra_date_from: 1870
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1859202 Museum LaneTitusvilleState: PAZip: 16354Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/minerals-extraction-and-refining/-40-drake-oil-well-%281859%29Creator: Drake, Edwin
The drilling of this oil well marks the modern phase of the petroleum industry. A series of revolutionary technological changes, unforeseen even by the most prophetic, followed. Drake demonstrated practical oil recovery by applying salt-well drilling techniques, including the use of the derrick, and invented the modern method of driving iron pipe. While excavation for oil dates back to the 1500s in this area, its uses were not explored until the 1800s. It was first sold as a curative potion and then developed into a illuminant by the 1850s.
YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Zamoose (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: Drake Oil WellEra_date_from: 1859
Cleveland Hopkins Airport
Society: ASCEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1925 Hopkins International AirportClevelandState: OHZip: 44135Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Cleveland-Hopkins-Airport/Creator: Hopkins, William , Berry, Jack

Constructed on 1,040 acres just 10 miles southwest of the city center, the Cleveland Hopkins Airport was the first major airport in the world to provide an integrated system of paved landing surfaces, lighted runways, and a terminal complex consisting of hangars and operating facilities. Overseen by city manager William Hopkins and Major "Jack" Berry - an engineer on loan from the U.S. postal service who eventually became the city's first Airport Commissioner - the project at first was called "Major Berry's Folly" by local residents because of its outlying location.

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Ken Lund (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Cleveland Hopkins AirportEra_date_from: 1925
A.O. Smith Automatic Frame Plant
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1920Milwaukee, WICountry: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/37-a-o-smith-automatic-frame-plantCreator: A.O. Smith Corporation

In 1899, during the earliest days of the automobile revolution, A. O. Smith developed a new, lightweight steel car frame. Within a few short years, he was selling these frames to a “who’s who” of car makers including Cadillac, Oldsmobile, and Ford. A. O. Smith’s son, Lloyd Raymond, carried on the family company, expanding the automotive business and introducing the world’s first automated frame production line, the Mechanical Marvel.

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: ASMEImage Caption: The entire line at the A. O. Smith Automatic Frame Plant was controlled by the man on the bridge. The long, intricate assembling process completed itself practically without human aid.Era_date_from: 1920
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