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Mexico

El Camino Real (The Royal Road) Eastern Branch
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1000-1599DateCreated: 16th CenturySan AntonioState: TXZip: 78207Country: MexicoWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/el-camino-real---eastern-branch/Creator: Spain, Kingdom of

Historically, a camino real (Royal Road) is defined as a road that connects Spanish capital with Spanish capital, a distinction not shared with roads connecting ordinary Spanish or Indian villages. The term Camino Real implied that the status and privileges granted to the villas and capitals it connected were extended to the main routes of travel through use by officials and others acting in the interest of the crown. Unlike ordinary Indian and Spanish villages, villas like San Antonio and others along the route had charters that prescribed royal privileges.

YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Photo courtesy Orange County Archives.Image Caption: The El Camino Real arches, located at Knott's Berry Farm in California. The arches are marked "El Camino Real: 'The King's Highway'"Era_date_from: 16th Century
Acueducto de Queretaro
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1700-1749DateCreated: 1726 - 1738De Los Arcos 171Santiago de QuerétaroState: QuerétaroZip: 76020Country: MexicoWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/acueduto-de-queretaro/Creator: de Urrutia y Arana, Juan Antonio

Queretaro's aqueduct, in Central Mexico, is one of the most eloquent symbols of colonial Mexico. As one of the early major hydraulic engineering projects in North America, it defines the city both nationally and internationally. The aqueduct, designed in 1723 by Juan Antonio de Urrutia y Arana, Marquis of Villa del Villar del Aquila, was inspired by the aqueducts of Segovia, Merida and Tarragona in Spain. It began supplying clean water to the city in this arid region of Mexico on October 17, 1738.

YearAdded:
1995
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Ephobius (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Acueducto de QueretaroEra_date_from: 1726
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