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Water Supply

Druid Lake Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1871Druid Hill ParkBaltimoreState: MDCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Druid-Lake-Dam/Creator: Martin, Robert

Like other American cities in the late 19th century, Baltimore had grown so quickly its supply system was unable to provide city residents with a dependable supply of water. Two reservoirs built outside the city helped increase capacity, but heavy rainfalls in the largely agricultural area tended to foul this additional water supply. City officials elected to construct a holding reservoir within the city - contained by an earthen dam - where silty water would be allowed to settle. No such project had ever been undertaken in the United States.

YearAdded:
1971
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Jeff Covey (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Druid Lake DamEra_date_from: 1871
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1914 Sewerage and Water BoardNew OrleansState: LAZip: 70165Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-3-a-b--wood-screw-pump-%281914%29Creator: Wood, Baldwin
With a water table several feet below ground level, New Orleans faced a crisis after every heavy rainfall, not just through flooding but also through disease (yellow fever and malaria) caused by impure water. New Orleans was dependent on mechanical means for lifting water from its canals and sewage systems. A. Baldwin Wood (1879-1956), a young assistant city engineer, designed and installed a system of large screw pumps (axial flow machines) to syphon water and accelerate drainage. By 1915 the Wood screw pump became the most advanced drainage pump in use.
YearAdded:
1974
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: This 14-foot tall Wood Screw Pump, constructed 1929, drained even more sewage/water/drainage than the 12-foot drains that preceded itEra_date_from: 1914
Acueducto de Queretaro
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1700-1749DateCreated: 1726 - 1738De Los Arcos 171Santiago de QuerétaroState: QuerétaroZip: 76020Country: MexicoWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/acueduto-de-queretaro/Creator: de Urrutia y Arana, Juan Antonio

Queretaro's aqueduct, in Central Mexico, is one of the most eloquent symbols of colonial Mexico. As one of the early major hydraulic engineering projects in North America, it defines the city both nationally and internationally. The aqueduct, designed in 1723 by Juan Antonio de Urrutia y Arana, Marquis of Villa del Villar del Aquila, was inspired by the aqueducts of Segovia, Merida and Tarragona in Spain. It began supplying clean water to the city in this arid region of Mexico on October 17, 1738.

YearAdded:
1995
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Ephobius (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Acueducto de QueretaroEra_date_from: 1726
The Espada Aqueduct, running over the Piedras Creek
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1700-1749DateCreated: 1718-1744San Antonio Missions National Historical ParkSan AntonioState: TXZip: 78221Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/acequias-of-san-antonio/Creator: Franciscan friars

This is one of the earliest uses of engineered water supply and irrigation systems in the United States. The first of eight original acequias was under construction in 1718 and two are still in operation. The remains of one are visible on the grounds of the Alamo. The Acequias of San Antonio are among the earliest engineered water supply and irrigation systems recorded in the United States. The Acequias served an integral role in the growth and stability of the San Antonio community for nearly 200 years.

YearAdded:
1968
Image Credit: Courtesy: Flickr/Amy the Nurse (CC BY-ND 2.0) Image Caption: The Espada Aqueduct, running over the Piedras CreekEra_date_from: 1718
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