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Pumping

Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1890sYork Water CompanyYorkState: PAZip: 17401Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/77-worthington-horizontal-cross-compound-pumping, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/8943cdf5-6cab-4567-b165-42f489334684/77-Worthington-Horizontal-Cross-compound-Pumping.aspxCreator: Corliss, George H.

Smaller and cheaper than a triple-expansion vertical engine, the horizontal cross-compound pumping engine, Pump No. 2, ran at relatively slow revolutions and was considered the height of engineering from the 1890s to World War I. This pumping engine at the York Water Company was built by the Worthington Pump & Machinery Corporation, Snow-Holly Works, Buffalo, New York.

YearAdded:
1982
Era_date_from: 1890s
Reynolds-Corliss Pumping Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1917Main Street Pumping StationJacksonvilleState: FLZip: 32206Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-12-reynolds-corliss-pumping-engine-%281917%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/15c2d049-d9f4-4272-b2b1-620835320534/12_Reynolds_Corliss_Pumping_Engine.aspxCreator: Allis-Chalmers Company

Installed alongside an Epping Carpenter pump that was later scrapped, this water pump was built by Allis-Chalmers, which for many years had Edwin Reynolds as its chief engineer. Driven by a Corliss steam engine, these large city water pumps were installed in Jacksonville's water supply improvement program in 1915, and each pumped 5 million gallons of water a day until 1930 when the first of the electric-driven peripheral pumping stations began operating. Steam engine operation was discontinued in 1956.

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Main Street Pumping Station - Jacksonville Water Department - 1917
Old Plant in Foreground - Landmark Reynolds-corliss Engine and
Allis Chalmers Pump Located in the Building in the Background.
View Looking North From Hogan's Creek
Era_date_from: 1917
Leavitt-Riedler Pumping Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1894Chestnut Hill Pumping StationBostonState: MAZip: 02167Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-2-leavitt-riedler-pumping-engine---%281894%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/434e19f3-4729-4fbe-a7dc-2437ea265f18/2_Leavitt_Riedler_Pumping_Engine_1894.aspxCreator: Leavitt, Erasmus Darwin

This machine is an unusual triple-expansion, three-crank rocker engine, which in its day was a high-capacity unit providing outstanding performance for the Boston Water Works Corporation. Designed by Erasmus Darwin Leavitt, Jr. (1836-1916), Engine No. 3 was installed in 1894 to a high-service pumping facility on the south side of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir in Brighton.

YearAdded:
1973
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Leavitt-Riedler Pumping EngineEra_date_from: 1894
Fairmount Water Works
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1815Schuylkill RiverPhiladelphiaState: PAZip: 19130Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/21-fairmount-water-worksCreator: Graff, Frederick , Latrobe, Benjamin

At a time when steam power was finding its first uses in America, Philadelphia opened two steam pumping stations, January 1801, to lift water from the Schuylkill River and distribute it through the city's wooden pipes and mains. By 1811 a new water power works was begun on the river near Morris Hill, and the Fairmount Water Works opened September 7, 1815. These water works represented the first large-scale application of steam pumping to water service in the country.

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Fairmount Waterworks, East bank of Schuylkill River, Aquarium Drive, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA View looking northeast at waterworks from across Schuylkill River. Photo taken December, 1984.
Era_date_from: 1815
Cruquius Pumping Station
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1849Cruquiusdijk 27
HaarlemmermeerCountry: NetherlandsWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-153-cruquius-pumping-station-%281849%29Creator: Cruquius, Nicolaus Samuel , Beijerinck, Jan Anne

This is one of three nearly identical pumping stations that drained the Haarlemmermeer (Haarlem Lake), 1849- 52, then continued to maintain the polder's water table for more than 80 years. The Haarlemmermeer area covers 45,000 acres (about 70 square miles) in a triangular region between the cities of Amsterdam, Haarlem, and Leiden.

YearAdded:
1991
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Mirko Junge (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Cruquius Pumping StationEra_date_from: 1849
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1913ErieState: PACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-59-chestnut-street-pumping-engine-%281913%29Creator: Bethlehem Steel Company

At the site of the first water pumping station providing water and sewage systems to the City of Erie in 1868, the Chestnut Street Pumping Station houses one of the largest steam engines, which pumped 20 million gallons a day. The triple-expansion steam reciprocating engine, which pumped water from the filter plant to the city reservoir, was typical of those used in municipal water pumping stations throughout the country during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Caption: Chestnut Street Pumping EngineEra_date_from: 1913
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1893300 East Ludington StreetIron MountainState: MIZip: 49801Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-124-chapin-mine-pump-%281893%29Creator: Edward P. Allis Company, Reynolds, Edwin
As one of the large strikes in the Lake Superior geological district, the Chapin Mine was located under a cedar swamp and unminable until it was drained by one of the largest pumping engines of the 1880s. Miners at the Chapin Mine, which began producing ore in 1880, soon tried to sink a deep shaft through 90 feet of quicksand, using enormous pumps driven by compressed air. The sand was frozen using two of the largest refrigeration compressors built, and a sectional cast-iron circular shell lined the D shaft. Mining continued for ten years using conventional pumps to dewater the lower levels.
YearAdded:
1987
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Chapin Mine PumpEra_date_from: 1893
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1914 Sewerage and Water BoardNew OrleansState: LAZip: 70165Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-3-a-b--wood-screw-pump-%281914%29Creator: Wood, Baldwin
With a water table several feet below ground level, New Orleans faced a crisis after every heavy rainfall, not just through flooding but also through disease (yellow fever and malaria) caused by impure water. New Orleans was dependent on mechanical means for lifting water from its canals and sewage systems. A. Baldwin Wood (1879-1956), a young assistant city engineer, designed and installed a system of large screw pumps (axial flow machines) to syphon water and accelerate drainage. By 1915 the Wood screw pump became the most advanced drainage pump in use.
YearAdded:
1974
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: This 14-foot tall Wood Screw Pump, constructed 1929, drained even more sewage/water/drainage than the 12-foot drains that preceded itEra_date_from: 1914
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