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1976

Pit Silo
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: StorageEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1876Oakland ManorColumbiaState: MDZip: 21044Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/pit-silo-6.aspxCreator: Morris, Francis

Designated a Historic Landmark of Agricultural Engineering at Oakland Manor In 1876 Francis Morris Built Brick Silos in His Barn and Introduced the Practice of Making Corn Silage in the United States. His Further Experiments Developed the Use of Earthen Trenches and Thereby Significantly Contributed to the Development of American Agriculture Dedicated by Amercan Society of Agricultural Engineers 1976

YearAdded:
1976
Image Caption: A pit silo in Araguacema, circa 1964. This style of silage was originally conceived by Francis Morris in the 19th century.
New Holland Baler
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: MechanizationEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1937508 W Main StNew HollandState: PAZip: 17557Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/new-holland-baler-11.aspx

This machine is the world's first successful automatic pickup, self-tying hay baler. Its invention was a significant contribution to the development of American Agriculture. The baler was invented and hand-built in 1937 at Farmersville, Pa., a few miles from here. After testing and improvement, some production models were made at Kinzers, Pa. Balers of this type were first mass-produced in 1940 by the New Holland Machine Company. Dedicated by American Society of Agricultural Engineers 1976

YearAdded:
1976
John Deere Moldboard Plow
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, TillageEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1837The John Deere Historic SiteGrand DetourState: ILZip: 61021Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/john-deere-plow-7.aspxCreator: Deere, John

On this site in 1837 John Deere built the first successful self-scouring steel plow, thereby making a significant contribution to the development of American agriculture. Dedicated by American Society of Agricultural Engineers 1976

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Dwight Sipler (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: moldboards of a modern plow
Reynolds-Corliss Pumping Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1917Main Street Pumping StationJacksonvilleState: FLZip: 32206Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-12-reynolds-corliss-pumping-engine-%281917%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/15c2d049-d9f4-4272-b2b1-620835320534/12_Reynolds_Corliss_Pumping_Engine.aspxCreator: Allis-Chalmers Company

Installed alongside an Epping Carpenter pump that was later scrapped, this water pump was built by Allis-Chalmers, which for many years had Edwin Reynolds as its chief engineer. Driven by a Corliss steam engine, these large city water pumps were installed in Jacksonville's water supply improvement program in 1915, and each pumped 5 million gallons of water a day until 1930 when the first of the electric-driven peripheral pumping stations began operating. Steam engine operation was discontinued in 1956.

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Main Street Pumping Station - Jacksonville Water Department - 1917
Old Plant in Foreground - Landmark Reynolds-corliss Engine and
Allis Chalmers Pump Located in the Building in the Background.
View Looking North From Hogan's Creek
Era_date_from: 1917
National Road
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1811-1839WheelingState: WVCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/National-Road/Creator: Knight, Jonathan , Thompson, Josiah

The National Road was the first interstate highway in the United States, and the first roadway to be financed with federal money. Authorized by Congress during the administration of Thomas Jefferson in 1806, the road was built over time and in sections from Cumberland, Maryland, westward through the states of Pennsylvania, Virginia (now West Virginia), Ohio, and Indiana, before terminating at the state capital of Vidalia, Illinois.

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Citynoise (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: National RoadEra_date_from: 1811
Morris Canal Reaction Turbine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: WaterEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1850Morris CanalGreenwich TownshipState: NJZip: 07840Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/mechanical-power-production-water/-38-morris-canal-%28reaction%29-turbine-%281850%29-Creator: Renwick, James

This reaction or "Scotch" turbine had as its antecedent the steam reaction wheel invented in Greek Alexandra by Hero around 100 B.C.. It found widespread hydraulic application in the United States from the beginning of the nineteenth century to mid-century when French-inspired hydraulic turbine design pushed reaction wheels into obsolence.

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Morris Canal Reaction TurbineEra_date_from: 1850
King's Road
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1750-1799DateCreated: 1775New SmyrnaState: FLCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/King-s-Road/Creator: Grant, James

When Governor James Grant arrived in the newly acquired British colony of East Florida in 1764, he found it devoid of settlers. To increase both the population and commerce with the 13 colonies to the north, he commanded that a road be built from his provincial capital of St. Augustine to Ft. Barrington, Georgia. 

YearAdded:
1976
Image Caption: Section of a map showing King's Road in the Territory of Florida, by the United States Army Corps of Engineers, published in 1839.Era_date_from: 1775
Hanford B Reactor
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1944Hanford SiteSunnysideState: WAZip: 98944Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/minerals-extraction-and-refining/-14-hanford-b-reactor-%281944%29Creator: Fermi, Enrico , E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

The Hanford B-Reactor was the first plutonium production reactor to be placed in operation. Its success made possible the subsequent development of atomic energy. The research work, engineering, and planning required to make the reactor operate is one of our most advanced achievements. Much of the reactor core, cooling system, shielding, and auxiliary systems were designed by mechanical engineers.

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/David Lee (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Hanford B ReactorEra_date_from: 1944
Elephant Butte Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1916Rio Grande RiverTruth or ConsequencesState: NMZip: 87901Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Elephant-Butte-Dam/Creator: Hill, Louis

One of the first major efforts to increase farming and encourage habitation in the arid regions of the western United States, the Rio Grande Project was designed to provide reliable irrigation as well as resolve a dispute over water supply with the Republic of Mexico.  The project's centerpiece is Elephant Butte Dam, a concrete gravity structure 301 feet high and 1,674 feet wide. Elephant Butte Reservoir - with a surface area of 36,600 acres and a capacity of more than 2.2 million acre-feet - was the largest reservoir in the world at the time of its completion.

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Public Domain (United States Bureau of Reclamation)Image Caption: Elephant Butte Dam, 2016 (day before centenial celebration)Era_date_from: 1916
Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railway
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1880Cumbres PassAntonitoState: COZip: 81120Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Cumbres-and-Toltec-Scenic-Railway/Creator: Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad, Baldwin Locomotive Works

Winding over 64 miles through the majestic San Juan mountains, the narrow-gauge railway known today as the Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad was built as a branch of the extensive Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad that ran through western Colorado and most of Utah. It originally served the large number of settlers flocking to the gold and silver mines of the region.

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Larry Lamsa (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Cumbres and Toltec Scenic RailwayEra_date_from: 1880
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