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Duck Creek Aqueduct Covered Bridge
Main Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 183919001-19041 Pennington Rd.MetamoraState: INZip: 47030Country: USA

Duck Creek Aqueduct is a rare surviving example of a covered timber aqueduct. It was one of several similar structures on the Whitewater Canal, which operated between the Whitewater Valley and the Ohio River from 1839 to 1865. After being displaced by the railroad, the canal supplied hydraulic power for the industrial districts at Metamora and Brookville.

Image Credit: Anthony Dillon
Doe River (Elizabethton) Bridge
Main Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1884ElizabethtonState: TNZip: 37643Country: USA

Doe River Bridge is a fine example of a timber Howe truss, one of the most widely-used timber bridge designs. Built in 1884, this structure played an integral role in the development of the City of Elizabethton, Tennessee, and it is a rare example of a covered bridge that survives in an urban setting.

The original contract specified the unusual hip roof design, which resembles covered bridges in central Europe. The structure is very well-maintained and still carries automobile traffic. The bridge was restored in 2003.

Image Credit: Brent Moore, Nashville
Bunker Hill Covered Bridge
Main Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 18954160 US-70State: NCZip: 28610Country: USAWebsite: https://catawbahistory.org/bunker-hill-covered-bridgeCreator: Andrew L. Ramsour

Bunker Hill Bridge is the only surviving Haupt truss bridge in the U.S. and one of only two surviving covered bridges in North Carolina. Patented in 1839, the Haupt truss featured diagonal braces spanning multiple panels, which was an attempt to eliminate the cross-strain found in lattice truss bridges. Although it was almost immediately eclipsed by the Howe truss and never reached the mainstream of covered bridge building, the Haupt truss is of interest for its association with Gen.

Image Credit: Catawba County Historical Association
Ashuelot Covered Bridge
Main Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 186520 Hampshire Ct, , NH AshuelotState: NHZip: 03441Country: USA

The Ashuelot Covered Bridge is located at the center of Ashuelot, NH. It is a Town lattice truss bridge, spanning the Ashuelot River in a roughly north-south orientation. It consists of two spans with a total length of 178 feet (54 m). The total width of the bridge is 29 feet (8.8 m), and has a central roadway and sidewalks (measuring 3'10" in width) on each side. The bridge rests on stone abutments and a central pier. The abutments have been reinforced with concrete since the bridge was built, and the central pier has been protected by a metal breakwater.

Image Credit: Edwin S. Grosvenor
Ackley Covered Bridge
Main Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 183220900 Oakwood Blvd.DearbornState: MIZip: 48124Country: USACreator: Joshua Ackley

Ackley Bridge is an excellent example of a multiple kingpost truss and a noteworthy early example of covered bridge preservation efforts in the United States. Built in 1832 by Joshua Ackley (b.1805) and Daniel Clouse (b.1812), Ackley Bridge originally spanned Enslow’s Branch of Wheeling Creek between Greene County and Washington County in Pennsylvania, where it carried traffic for over a century.

Image Credit: The Henry FordImage Caption: The Ackley Covered Bridge was moved to the Henry Ford Museum and restored.
Vegetated Waterways
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1935Agricultural Hall, Oklahoma State UniversityStillwaterState: OKZip: 74078Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/vegetated-waterways-23.aspx

Design Concepts For Vegetated Waterways - Historic Landmark of Agricultural Engineering Rainfall runoff causes severe gully erosion on unprotected lands and has ruined thousands of U S acres in the past. Concepts were developed at this site for vegetation-lined waterways that now safely convey runoff water from millions of acres.Engineers of the US Soil Conservation Service (SCS) initiated studies on hydraulics of vegetated waterways at an outdoor laboratory near Spartanburg, South Carolina, in 1935. Under the directions of W. O.

YearAdded:
1990
Image Credit: Courtesy The Geograph project/Hugh Venables (CC BY-SA 2.0)
Universal Soil Loss Equation
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1965National Soil Erosion Research LabWest LafayetteState: INZip: 47907Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/universal-soil-loss-equation-41.aspx

The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) was developed at the USDA National Runoff and Soil Loss Data Center at Purdue University in a national effort led by Walter H. Wischmeier and Dwight D. Smith. The USLE was published in 1965 in USDA Agriculture Handbook 282.

YearAdded:
2003
Image Caption: The Universal Soil Loss Equation for estimating average annual soil erosion.

A = average annual soil loss (in tons/acre)
R = rainfall erosivity index
K = soil erodibility factor
LS = topographic factor
C = cropping factor
P = conservation practice factor
UC-Blackwelder Tomato Harvester
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1949Western Center for Agricultural EquipmentDavisState: CAZip: 95616Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/uc-blackwelder-tomato-harvester-45.aspxCreator: Hanna, Jack

In 1942, University of California, Davis (UCD) biologist, Jack Hanna recognized the need for breeding tomato varieties that ripen uniformly and withstand the rigors of mechanical harvesting. In 1949, UCD agricultural engineer Coby Lorenzen and Hanna began developing a mechanical tomato harvester. Parallel efforts by others, notably those started in 1957 by agricultural engineer Bill Stout and horticulturist Stan Ries of Michigan State University, eventually resulted in several different harvesting mechanisms. In the late 1950s, UCD agricultural engineer Steven J.

YearAdded:
2005
Tower Silo
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: StorageEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1873Lyle C. Thomas ParkSpring GroveState: ILZip: 60081Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/tower-silo-18.aspxCreator: Hatch, Fred L.

First Tower Silo Designated A Historic Landmark Of  Agricultural Engineering. The First Tower Silo In America Was Erected Near This Site On The Hatch Farm, One Half-Mile East Of Spring Grove, Illinois. Fred L. Hatch And His Father, Lewis Hatch, Erected This Silo In October 1873, After Fred Graduated From The Illinois Industrial University. (Now The University Of Illinois). Textbooks On Agriculture Were Scarce, And Professor Willard F. Bliss Translated French And German Pamphlets On Silage Production Wherein The Entire Corn Plant Was Buried In Pits, And This Inspired Young Hatch.

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Doc Searls (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: A modern tower silo
The USDA Small Watershed Program
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Drainage & WatershedEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1948USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service State OfficeStillwaterState: OKZip: 74074Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/the-usda-small-watershed-program-57.aspx

Since 1948, over 11,000 dams and associated conservation practices in more than 2,000 watershed projects encompassing 160 million acres in 47 states have been constructed as a part of the USDA Small Watershed Program. These projects have improved the quality of life and the environment in rural communities by protecting people's lives and property, conserving soil and water resources, reducing flooding, providing economic development, recreation, and water supplies, enhancing water quality, and improving wetlands and wildlife habitat.

YearAdded:
2011
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