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Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Industrial AdvancesEra: 1980-1989DateCreated: 1984200 South Wilcox DriveKingsportState: TNZip: 37660Country: USAWebsite: http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/chemicalsfromcoal.htmlCreator: Eastman Chemical Company

Chemicals from the Coal Facility of Eastman Chemical Company was the first in the United States to use coal rather than petroleum as a raw material in the commercial production of acetyl chemicals — important building blocks in the synthesis of a wide range of consumer products. The plant, located in Kingsport, Tennessee, began operation in 1983 after more than a decade of planning and construction, prompted by the oil embargoes of the 1970s.

YearAdded:
1995
Image Credit: Courtesy Eastman Chemical Company. Image Caption: Flow diagram for the chemicals from coal facility.
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1955Arnold Air Force BaseArnold AFBState: TNZip: 37389Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-140-arnold-afb-wind-tunnel-%281955%29Creator: Sverdrup, Lief
This propulsion wind tunnel (PWT) at Arnold AFB was the first large-scale facility for testing jet and rocket engines in simulated high-speed flight conditions. It has a unique combination of transonic (1955) and supersonic (1960) wind tunnels using a common 236,000 horsepower drive, the world's largest when built. It can achieve air speeds up to Mach 4.75 at altitudes up to 150,000 feet in its 16-foot square, removable test sections. Design engineers were Lief J. Sverdrup, John R. Parcel, Brice Smith, and Walter Cook, of Sverdrup and Parcel, St.
YearAdded:
1989
Image Credit: Public Domain (US Air Force)Image Caption: The world's first large-scale testing facility for jet and rocket engines in simulated high-speed flight conditionsEra_date_from: 1955
Tennessee State Capitol
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1845-1877Tennessee State CapitolNashvilleState: TNZip: 37219Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Tennessee-State-Capitol/Creator: Strickland, William , Bogart, John

The Tennessee State Capitol, the first and only home of the Tennessee General Assembly, was designed by engineer and architect William Strickland. Since its construction, it has ably served, with little modification, as the seat of Tennessee's government.

YearAdded:
2003
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Ron CogswellImage Caption: Tennessee State CapitolEra_date_from: 1845
Norris Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1936Norris DamKnoxvilleState: TNZip: 37705Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Norris-Dam/Creator: Wank, Roland

Norris Dam impounds the Clinch River, a mountain tributary of the Tennessee River. The facility stands as a tribute and symbol of the birth of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Given broad jurisdiction over resource development in the watershed (a 40,000-square-mile basin comprising parts of Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, and Tennessee), the TVA was formed to plan for flood control, improve navigation, and produce hydroelectric power.

YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/vosburg09 (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Norris DamEra_date_from: 1936
Morison's Memphis Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1892Mississippi RiverMemphisState: TNZip: 38106Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Morison-s-Memphis-Bridge/Creator: Morison, George

The Memphis Bridge (now called the Frisco Bridge) comprises three spans across the Mississippi River. With a main span measuring over 790 feet, it was one of the longest railroad bridges in the world upon completion. The renowned George Morison, after whom the bridge is unofficially named, served as Chief Engineer.

YearAdded:
1987
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Morison's Memphis BridgeEra_date_from: 1892
Lookout Mountain Incline Railway
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895Lookout MountainChattanoogaState: TNZip: 37350Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/rail-transportation---2/-156-lookout-mountain-incline-railway-%281895%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/769218e7-8ab4-486a-8de5-f5e7a4299859/156-Lookout-Mountain-Incline-Railway-1895.aspxCreator: Crass, John , Lookout Mountain Incline Railway Company

At the mountain where the Civil War's Battle Above the Clouds was waged, tourist business has thrived from the building of its first toll road (Whiteside Pike) in 1857 to present day.

YearAdded:
1991
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Duane Tate (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Lookout Mountain Incline RailwayEra_date_from: 1895
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1930ABB Combustion EngineeringChattanoogaState: TNZip: 37402Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/-44-fusion-welded-test-boiler-drum-%281930%29Creator: Combustion Engineering Inc., Moses, A. J.
This fusion-welded drum, tested during 1930, was the first in a series tested at Combustion Engineering Inc. that led to the industrial acceptance of welding for the fabrication of boiler drums. Replacing riveting for steam power plants, electric arc fusion welding permitted increased efficiencies through higher working pressures and temperatures and fabrication of larger units of improved safety. Welding was then rapidly extended to fabrication using optimum alloys for pressure vessel and structural application. Papers published by A. J.
YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Image source: Engrailhistory.infoImage Caption: Fusion-welded Test Boiler DrumEra_date_from: 1930
Montgomery Bell's Tunnel
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: TunnelsEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1818Harpeth River State ParkKingston SpringsState: TNZip: 37082Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Montgomery-Bell-s-Tunnel/Creator: Bell, Montgomery

Montogomery Bell was a land developer and iron maker who purchased the Harpeth Narrows site to expand his industrial empire - which ultimately consisted of 14 iron blast furnaces throughout middle Tennessee.

The Harpeth River makes a tight bend around a steep limestone ridge, losing 17 feet of elevation in a run of 5 1/2 miles. Bell excavated a tunnel through the limestone ridge, creating a shortcut for the river. The hydropower derived from this drop in elevation was used to drive the Patterson Iron Works built by Bell.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Montgomery Bell's TunnelEra_date_from: 1818
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