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Electronic Technology for Space Rocket Launches
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1950-1969Kennedy Space CenterBrevard CountyState: FLZip: 32899Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Electronic_Technology_for_Space_Rocket_Launches,_1950-1969

The demonstrated success in space flight is the result of electronic technology developed at Cape Canaveral, the J. F. Kennedy Space Center, and other sites. A wide variety of advances in radar tracking, data telemetry, instrumentation, space-to-ground communications, on-board guidance, and real-time computation were employed to support the U.S. space program. These and other electronic developments provided infrastructure necessary for the successful landing of men on the moon in July 1969 and their safe return to earth.

YearAdded:
2001
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/NASAImage Caption: A culmination of research in radar tracking, data telemetry, instrumentation, space-to-ground communications, on-board guidance, and real-time computation: the 1969 moon landing.Era_date_from: 1950
Pegasus 3 Engine BS 916
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1993Rolls Royce PLC
BristolState: BCZip: BS34 7QECountry: UKWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/--168-pegasus-3-engine-bs-916-%281960%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/f2e04cf6-f24f-4633-bb2f-ef61c5deb500/168-Pegasus-3-Engine-BS-916.aspxCreator: Bristol Aero-Engines Ltd. (now part of Rolls-Royce), Hooker, Stanley

The Pegasus 3 is the earliest surviving example of the prototype engine for vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) jets, namely the Royal Air Force's Harriers and US Marine Corps' AV-8Bs. Owned by the Rolls- Royce Heritage Trust (a company-sponsored history and preservation society), the artifact is an early developmental model of the Pegasus 3 engine, the first to fly with sufficient thrust to prove the vectored-thrust concept for V/STOL jet aircraft, in 1960.

YearAdded:
1993
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: The earliest surviving example of the prototype engine for vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) jets, namely Harriers and AV-8Bs.Era_date_from: 1993
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1955Arnold Air Force BaseArnold AFBState: TNZip: 37389Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-140-arnold-afb-wind-tunnel-%281955%29Creator: Sverdrup, Lief
This propulsion wind tunnel (PWT) at Arnold AFB was the first large-scale facility for testing jet and rocket engines in simulated high-speed flight conditions. It has a unique combination of transonic (1955) and supersonic (1960) wind tunnels using a common 236,000 horsepower drive, the world's largest when built. It can achieve air speeds up to Mach 4.75 at altitudes up to 150,000 feet in its 16-foot square, removable test sections. Design engineers were Lief J. Sverdrup, John R. Parcel, Brice Smith, and Walter Cook, of Sverdrup and Parcel, St.
YearAdded:
1989
Image Credit: Public Domain (US Air Force)Image Caption: The world's first large-scale testing facility for jet and rocket engines in simulated high-speed flight conditionsEra_date_from: 1955
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1954Steven F. Udvar-Hazy CenterChantillyState: VAZip: 20151Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-178-boeing-367-80-%281954%29-, http://files.asme.org/asmeorg/Communities/History/Landmarks/5506.pdfCreator: Boeing
The 367-80 is the prototype for most jet transports. Its success was due largely to its mechanical systems, including turbine engines with thrust reversers and noise suppressors, redundant hydraulic control systems, and an improved cabin-pressurization system. Honeycomb flap panels were introduced, along with a strong, lightweight structural design that controlled fatigue cracking. These led to several innovations in aircraft tooling and manufacturing techniques. The Dash-80 was the first commercial airliner economical enough to take the US airline industry off subsidy.
YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Boeing Dreamscape (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Prototype of the Boeing 707 and most jet transport systems, the Boeing 367-80 established economic feasibility of commercial air travel.Era_date_from: 1954
Hydromatic Propeller
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1938New England Air Museum
Bradley Intl. Airport
Windsor LocksState: CTZip: 06096Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-149-hydromatic-propeller-%28ca--1938%29, http://files.asme.org/ASMEORG/Communities/History/Landmarks/5572.pdfCreator: Hamilton Standard

Rapid development of aircraft design in the 1930s required many related innovations, including propeller design. The hydromatic propeller by Hamilton Standard marked a significant advance over the counterweight-type, controllable pitch propeller. The first test flight of the prototype took place in 1938: the public demonstration was made by a United Air Lines DC-3 over New York City on April 6, 1938. It played a distinguished role in allied combat aircraft in World War II.

YearAdded:
1990
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: An early example of propeller innovations, including variable-pitch control and feathering capability.Era_date_from: 1938
Link C-3 Flight Trainer
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1935Roberson Museum and Science Center

BinghamtonState: NYZip: 13905Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/210-link-c-3-flight-trainerCreator: Link, Edwin

During the 1920s, Edwin A. Link was employed in his father's organ building and repair business. He obtained his pilot's license in 1927 and became convinced that a mechanical device could be built as an inexpensive method to teach basic piloting. Link received three patents on his flight trainer (No. 1,825,462, March 12, 1930; No. 2,244,464, June 3, 1941; and No. 2,358,016, Sept. 12, 1944).

YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Tony SpeerImage Caption: An early flight simulator representative of the first truly effective mechanical device used to simulate actual flight processes.Era_date_from: 1935
Wright Field 5-foot Wind Tunnel
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 192188th Air Base Wing Office of Public AffairsWright-Patterson Air Force BaseState: OHZip: 45433Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-183-wright-field-5-foot-wind-tunnel-%281921%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/5fe3daaf-75a3-4eb8-b5a7-da95fdc2413e/183-Wright-Field-5-Foot-Wind-Tunnel.aspxCreator: Air Service Engineering Division

Wind tunnel testing of aircraft models is essential to determine aerodynamic parameters such as lift and drag. The 5-foot Wright Field wind tunnel is an early example of the modern wind tunnel, well known from the early 1920s to the late 1950s for its contributions to research and the development of nearly every major aircraft and associated hardware used by the US Air Force and its predecessor, the Army Air Service.

YearAdded:
1995
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: This is an early example of the "modern" wind tunnel for aircraft-model testing. Era_date_from: 1921
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1911 Air BaseGetafeZip: 28906Country: SpainWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/uploadedFiles/About_AIAA/News_Room/GetafeHistoricSitePR.pdfCreator: de la Cierva, Juan

Getafe Airfield was the site of the world’s first successful rotorcraft flight, on January 17, 1923. Lieutenant Alejandro Gómez Spencer piloted a C.4 Autogiro designed and built by Juan de la Cierva, who tested a series of autogiros between 1920 and 1924 at the Getafe site. Cierva’s autogiros introduced important technologies and flight techniques that led to the development of helicopters and other rotary wing aircraft. Getafe Air Base, established in 1911, now houses several training and transport units of the Spanish Air Force, as well as two aerospace manufacturing plants.

YearAdded:
2011
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Jumbero (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Getafe AirfieldEra_date_from: 1911
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