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Claytile Drain
Society: ASABE Main Category: Agricultural & Biological Sub Category: Era: 1830-1839 DateCreated: 1835 Weaver Drain Tile Museum Geneva State: NY Zip: 14456 Country: USA Website: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/claytile-drain-3.aspx Creator: Johnston, John

Farm And Residence of John Johnston 1791 - 1880 Eminent Farmer Who Here Originated Tile Underdrainage in America in 1835 and Thereby Became an Outstanding Contributor to Human Welfare Honored by The American Society of Agricultural Engineers 1935. Erected by State Education Department

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Bell Aircraft Corporation's main factory
Society: AIAA Main Category: Aerospace & Aviation Sub Category: Manufacturing Era: 1930s DateCreated: 1935 Calspan Flight Research Center Niagara Falls State: NY Zip: Country: USA Website: https://www.aiaa.org/Secondary.aspx?id=14063 Creator: Bell, Lawrence Dale “Larry”

Bell Aircraft, founded in 1935 by Lawrence Dale “Larry” Bell, based its primary manufacturing facility in Wheatfield, New York, where several important aircraft were designed and produced. During the World War II era, the plant produced the P-39 Airacobra and the P-63 Kingcobra fighters. The P-39 was used to great effect by the Soviet Air Force, with the highest number of individual kills recorded by any U.S.-produced fighter aircraft during the war. The plant also designed and manufactured the P-59A Airacomet, the first U.S.

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2012
Image Credit: Image Caption: Bell Aircraft Corporation's main factory in Wheatfield, NY (Buffalo / Niagara Falls) during the 1940s. This unit primarily produced the Bell P-39 Airacobra and P-63 Kingcobra. Era_date_from:
John W. Draper
Society: ACS Main Category: Chemical Sub Category: People and Organizations Era: 1870-1879 DateCreated: 1876 New York University New York City State: NY Zip: Country: USA Website: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/draperacs.html Creator: Draper, John W.

The American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society, celebrated its 125th anniversary in 2001. Founded in 1876 in New York City, the Society now has 186 local sections in all 50 states, international chapters, and 32 technical divisions that bring together scientists with interests ranging from small business to environmental protection.

 

The text of the plaque commemorating the landmark reads:

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2001
Image Credit: public domain Image Caption: Portrait of John W. Draper, unknown date Era_date_from:
Society: ASCE Main Category: Sub Category: Water Transportation Era: 1910-1919 DateCreated: 1915 2 Pine St Lockport State: NY Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/flight-of-five-locks/ Creator:

The confluence of the Mohawk and Hudson rivers was the site of distinct advances in transportation of the early 19th Century. The Erie Canal in 1825 and the Mohawk and Hudson Railroad in 1831 were both of national significance.  

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Grand Central Terminal
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Era: 1910-1919 DateCreated: 1913 89 E 42nd St New York State: NY Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/grand-central-terminal/ Creator: Wilgus, William J.

Spearheaded by Chief Engineer William J. Wilgus and constructed under challenging conditions with no interruption of existing train service, Grand Central Terminal was a triumph of innovative engineering in the design of urban transportation centers. Its novel, two-level station, made possible by electric traction, streamlined both train and passenger movement by separating long-haul and suburban traffic and employing an extensive system of pedestrian ramps throughout the facility.

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Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Sracer357 (CC BY-SA 3.0) Image Caption: Grand Central Terminal Main Lobby Era_date_from:
The original wooden Union Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Era: DateCreated: 9 126th St Troy State: NY Zip: Country: Website: http://www.asce.org/project/waterford-(union)-bridge-(replaced-in-1909)/ Creator: Burr, Theodore

The Union Bridge was built in 1804 by Theodore Burr and was the first to cross the lower section of the Hudson River connecting Waterford and Lansingburg, New York. The wooden bridge's key feature was the arch that started below the deck at the abutments and ran near the top of the top chord at mid span. This was the first time in the United States that anyone had used an arch in combination with a truss in order to provide both stiffness and strength. Burr later patented his truss/arch pattern in 1806 and 1817.

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Image Credit: Image Caption: The original wooden Union Bridge before it burned down 1909 Era_date_from:
UTICA MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Era: 1950s DateCreated: 1959 400 Oriskany St W Utica State: NY Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/utica-memorail-auditorium/ Creator: Zetlin, Lev

The roof system of this building, designed by Lev Zetlin and opened in 1960, was the first of its kind in the world. Before the mid-1950's, the use of long-span cable structures was generally limited to suspension bridges. The only other significant cable roof structure preceding the Utica Memorial Auditorium was the North Carolina State Fair Livestock Judging Pavilion, completed in 1953.

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2011
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asce
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Era: 1850-1859 DateCreated: 1852 Old Croton Aqueduct Sleepy Hollow State: NY Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/site-of-the-founding-meeting-of-asce-on-nov-5,-1852/ Creator:

On October 23rd, 1852 a notice was sent to practitioners of civil engineering in and near New York City requesting their participation in developing an association that would serve the professionals who design and construct America's built environment. Twelve men responded to this invitation, meeting on November 5 in the office of Alfred W. Craven, chief engineer of the Croton Aqueduct  Department. These men became the founders of the American Society of Civil Engineers and Architects, later renamed the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).

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Russell Sage Laboratory
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Education Era: 1800-1829 DateCreated: 1824 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy State: NY Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/rensselaer-polytechnic-institute/ Creator:

Amos Eaton and Stephen Van Rensselaer founded the Rensselaer School for "the application of science to the common purposes of life" in 1824. Eaton had practiced surveying as a teenager building his own compass and chain and wrote an early book on surveying. Later he studied law before becoming interested in geology and agriculture. Stephen Van Rensselaer was the seventh patroon of Rensselaerwyck a track of land comprising most of the current Rensselaer, Albany and Columbia Counties in the State of New York.

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Image Credit: Image Caption: Russell Sage Laboratory, Front View, 1909- Era_date_from:
Society: ASME Main Category: Mechanical Sub Category: Era: 1940s DateCreated: 1947 George Eastman House Rochester State: NY Zip: 14607 Country: USA Website: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/engineering-history/landmarks/258-george-eastman-house-technology-collection Creator: Eastman, George

 

The oldest and most comprehensive collection of photographic and cinematic technology

In 1888, George Eastman created the Kodak camera, the first camera designed to use roll film. The camera's simplicity and user friendly mechanism revolutionized amateur snapshot photography and in 1892, he founded the Eastman Kodak Company, in Rochester, New York.

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2015
Image Credit: public domain Image Caption: Era_date_from:
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Innovations

Leo Baekeland and Bakelite

Around 1907, Belgian-born chemist Leo Hendrik Baekeland took two ordinary chemicals, phenol and formaldehyde, mixed them in a sealed autoclave, and subjected them to heat and pressure.

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Reuleaux Collection of Kinematic Mechanisms

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Bayonne Bridge

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Blenheim Bridge

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This is the first commercial, human-blood heat exchanger. Developed in 1957, it permitted a patient's body temperature to be safely and rapidly lowered during open heart surgery to any desired and precisely controlled hypothermic level, then during the conclusion of the operation rapidly rewarmed… Read More
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Brooklyn Bridge

On May 24, 1883, with schools and businesses closed for the occasion, New York celebrated the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge. Also known as the Great East River Bridge, it was built over 14 years in the face of enormous difficulties. Deaths, fire in the Brooklyn caisson, and a scandal over…

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Croton Water Supply System

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Delaware Aqueduct of the Delaware & Hudson Canal

The Delaware Aqueduct provided an important transportation link between the Pennsylvania's coalmines and New York's booming industrial marketplace. It is the earliest surviving work of John A. Roebling, who designed the Brooklyn Bridge  30 years later. The cable anchorage system first used…

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Erie Canal

In its day, the famous Erie Canal was the world's longest canal and America's greatest engineering feat. It was the principal route for emigrants from the East and agricultural products from the West. Before construction of the canal, New York City was the nation's fifth largest seaport, behind…

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Havemeyer Hall

Havemeyer Hall was built between 1896 and 1898 under the leadership of Charles Frederick Chandler. It provided research and teaching facilities for faculty and students specializing in industrial, inorganic, organic, physical, and biological chemistry. Pioneering research done here led to the…

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Herman Mark

The Polymer Research Institute was established in 1946 by Herman F. Mark, a pioneer in the study of giant molecules. The Institute brought together a number of polymer researchers to create the first academic facility in the United States devoted to the study and teaching of polymer science.…

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The first long underwater tunnel in the world designed for motor vehicle use was built from 1920 to 1927. The 29.5-foot-diameter, 8,500-foot-long twin tubes of this tunnel were shield-driven by the pneumatic method through extremely difficult river-bottom conditions that were overcome by the… Read More
Plans to build a rapid transit system in New York were first made in 1831. By 1868 the first elevated railway was erected. As the "El" became crowded, construction of an underground railway was proposed. Ground was broken on March 24, 1900. The original subway, which took opened October 27, 1904,… Read More
keeseville

A 214-foot single-span covered wooden bridge, built above the cribs of stone in the AuSable River that served to break log jams and ice floes, collapsed during the winter of 1875 under the weight of a three-foot snowfall and high winds. The "Upper Bridge" (pictured) was built in its place.…

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Manhattan Bridge

When opened in 1909, the 1,470 foot long main span of the Manhattan Bridge was the third longest suspension bridge span in the world, after the nearby Brooklyn and Williamsburg Bridges. The Manhattan Bridge has two 725 foot long suspended side spans for an overall length of 2,920 feet. The…

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When the Adams Plant went into operation on August 26, 1895, it represented a key victory for alternating-current systems over direct-current. The clear advantage of high voltage AC for long distance power transmission and the unprecedented size of the plant (it reached its full capacity of ten 5,… Read More

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