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1915

Society: ASCESub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 19152 Pine StLockportState: NYCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/flight-of-five-locks/

The confluence of the Mohawk and Hudson rivers was the site of distinct advances in transportation of the early 19th Century. The Erie Canal in 1825 and the Mohawk and Hudson Railroad in 1831 were both of national significance.  

Kansas City Park and Boulevard System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1915Kansas CityState: MIZip: 64106Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Kansas-City-Park-and-Boulevard-System/Creator: Kessler, George

"Who in Europe, or in America for that matter, knows that Kansas City is one of the loveliest cities on earth? [...] the residential section is a masterpiece of city planning [...]; Few cities have been built with so much regard for beauty."  

YearAdded:
1974
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/CharvexImage Caption: The park system encouraged planned land use, raised real estate values, and provided incentives for quality residential developments.Era_date_from: 1915
Tunkhannock Viaduct
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1915Tunkhannock CreekNicholsonState: PAZip: 18446Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Tunkhannock-Viaduct/Creator: Cohen, Abraham Burton, Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad

This majestic viaduct was built during the golden age of railroading. It was at the western end of a major readjustment in grade and alignment of the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, and had double tracks to carry the trains across the valley of Tunkhannock Creek. The Hallstead cutoff (between Scranton, Pennsylvania and Hallstead, New Jersey) reduced passenger travel time by 20 minutes, and freight travel time by over an hour.

YearAdded:
1975
Image Credit: Original Photo: Flickr/Jim Danvers (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Tunkhannock ViaductEra_date_from: 1915
The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code continues to impact modern day boilers and other types of pressure vessels.
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: SafetyEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1915Henry Ford Museum (Currently on loan to)DearbornState: MIZip: 48124Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/safety/-138-asme-boiler-and-pressure-vessel-code-%281915%29Creator: Meier, Edward, Stevens, John

Published in 1914-15, the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC) was the first comprehensive standard for the design, construction, inspection, and testing of boilers and pressure vessels. With adoption in the United States and use in many countries, it has contributed significantly to public safety and influenced the continued development of boiler and pressure vessel technology.

YearAdded:
1989
Image Credit: Courtesy of ASMEImage Caption: The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code continues to impact modern day boilers and other types of pressure vessels.Era_date_from: 1915
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