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Huey Long Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Era: 1930s DateCreated: 1935 Huey P Long Bridge Bridge City, LA 70094 State: LA Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/huey-p--long-bridge/ Creator: Modjeski, Ralph

"It remains today one of the great bridge engineering accomplishments for railway and highway bridges built in the country." 
 - Historic American Engineering Record, Southeast Regional Office, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2005

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Lake Pontchartrain Causeway
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1950s DateCreated: 1956 Lake Pontchartrain Causeway New Orleans State: LA Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/lake-pontchartrain-causeway-bridge/ Creator: Upson, Dr. Maxwell

In the 1940s and 1950s, New Orleans experienced growth. Unfortunately, access from the north to the City continued to be limited by Lake Pontchartrain. Driving around the Lake was a time consuming effort. During this time period, a renewed interest developed to provide a direct connection across the center of the Lake to the north shore. As a result, the Greater New Orleans Expressway Commission was formed to build the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway Bridge. The original bridge (southbound) was opened on August 30, 1956.

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Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/glennaa (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: Era_date_from:
Howard Clifford running off the Tacoma Narrows Bridge during collapse
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1940s DateCreated: 1940s Tacoma State: WA Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/tacoma-narrows-bridges(1)/ Creator: Eldridge, Clark

Taken together, the 1940 and 1950 Tacoma Narrows bridges mark a significant turning point in the design of long-span suspension bridges. The original 1940 structure was designed with one of the shallowest and narrowest stiffening elements of any long-span suspension bridge yet built. The structure failed dramatically in a rather moderate 42 mph windstorm on 7 November 1940, only four months after opening for traffic.

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Image Credit: Image Caption: Howard Clifford running off the Tacoma Narrows Bridge during collapse Era_date_from:
Old Wisla Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1850-1859 DateCreated: 1850-1857 Vistula River Tczew State: Zip: Country: Poland Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Old-Wisla-Bridge/ Creator: Lentze, Carl

Conceived as one of the major structures on the Prussian Eastern Railway, the Old Wisla Bridge at Tczew originally consisted of six wrought iron spans. Due to Germany's invasion of Poland at the beginning World War II in 1939, only three original spans remain today. These remaining spans represent a unique technical monument of civil engineering achievements in the mid-nineteenth century.

YearAdded:
2004
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Topory (CC BY-SA 3.0) Image Caption: Old Wisla Bridge Era_date_from: 1850
White River Concrete Arch Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1930 White River Cotter State: AR Zip: 72626 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/White-River-Concrete-Arch-Bridge/ Creator: Marsh, James Barney

When this 1,850-foot concrete-arch highway bridge was built on the White River in a remote region of northern Arkansas - prior to the construction of upriver, flood-control dams - flash floods occurred frequently, sometimes causing the water to rise as much as one foot per hour. Construction under these conditions presented a clear danger, so project managers specified both a design and an innovative construction method appropriate to the problem of building across a perilous stretch of unpredictable river.

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1986
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/jaystout (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: White River Concrete Arch Bridge Era_date_from: 1930
Whipple Truss Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1850-1859 DateCreated: 1855 Schenectady State: NY Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Whipple-Truss-Bridge/ Creator: Whipple, Squire

The Whipple Bowstring Truss Bridge was built from a design patented in 1841 by Squire Whipple. Whipple was the first person to understand the stresses in truss members and he developed the first theoretical formula to calculate stresses in the articulated truss. His bowstring truss was the first to use cast iron for compression and wrought iron for tension membranes.

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1981
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Rehrenberg Image Caption: A Whipple Bowstring Arch/Truss style bridge, built by S. DeGraff in Albany, NY Era_date_from: 1855
Walnut Street Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1890-1899 DateCreated: 1890 Susquehanna River Harrisburd State: PA Zip: 17101 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Walnut-Street-Bridge/ Creator: Bollman, Wendel , Reeves, Samuel

The structure has two segments: an East Channel bridge consisting of four 175-foot spans and three 240-foot spans crossing from Harrisburg to City Island; and a West Channel bridge, consisting of seven 175-foot spans crossing from City Island to Wormleysburg.

With 15 truss spans totaling 2,820 feet, the Walnut Street Bridge is the finest and largest surviving example of the standardized Phoenix wrought-iron truss bridges produced from 1884 to 1923.

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1997
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/rjonesProject856 (cc-by-2.0) Image Caption: Walnut Street Bridge Era_date_from: 1890
Waldo-Hancock Suspension Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1931 Penobscot River Stockton Springs State: ME Zip: E 04981 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Waldo-Hancock-Suspension-Bridge/ Creator: Steinman, David

Designed by David B. Steinman, of Robinson & Steinman, New York City, the Waldo-Hancock suspension Bridge is a significant example of Steinman's work. David Steinman is considered among the most important suspension bridge designers of the 20th century. He earned an engineering degree from Columbia University in 1909 and went on to apprentice with Gustav Lindenthal, then at work on New York's Hell Gate Bridge. In the 1920's, Steinman emerged as an outstanding and innovative suspension bridge designer.

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2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Justin Russell (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: Waldo-Hancock Suspension Bridge Era_date_from: 1931
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1900-1909 DateCreated: 1905 State: Zip: Country: Zimbabwe Website: Creator: Rhodes, Cecil
The Victoria Falls Bridge, completed in 1905, is a 152-meter span, steel-lattice, two-hinged arch bridge with a deck level 122 m above the Zambezi River. Conceived by Cecil Rhodes as a key link in his proposed Cape-to-Cairo railway, it is situated just downstream of the Victoria Falls in a site of unsurpassed grandeur. Although a product of the colonial period, it continues to serve and enhance the lives of all people living in the region.
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Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Christopher Jensen (CC BY-ND 2.0) Image Caption: Victoria Falls Bridge Era_date_from: 1905
Tunkhannock Viaduct
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1910-1919 DateCreated: 1915 Tunkhannock Creek Nicholson State: PA Zip: 18446 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Tunkhannock-Viaduct/ Creator: Cohen, Abraham Burton, Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad

This majestic viaduct was built during the golden age of railroading. It was at the western end of a major readjustment in grade and alignment of the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, and had double tracks to carry the trains across the valley of Tunkhannock Creek. The Hallstead cutoff (between Scranton, Pennsylvania and Hallstead, New Jersey) reduced passenger travel time by 20 minutes, and freight travel time by over an hour.

YearAdded:
1975
Image Credit: Original Photo: Flickr/Jim Danvers (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: Tunkhannock Viaduct Era_date_from: 1915
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