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2002

Naval Air Station North Island
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1917Naval Air Station North IslandSan DiegoState: CACountry: USAWebsite: https://info.aiaa.org/tac/ETMG/HISTC/Shared%20Documents/Historic%20Aerospace%20Sites%20(HAS)/Procedures%20and%20templates/HAS%20blurb.docCreator: U.S. Navy

Known as the birthplace of Naval Aviation, North Island was the site of the first successful seaplane flight and the first amphibious flight in the U.S., both made by Glenn Curtiss.  The first Naval pilot, Lt. T.G. Ellyson, was trained here at the Curtiss Aviation Camp.  A flight school established here by Ellyson trained the next Naval aviators as well as the Navy’s first aviation maintenance personnel.  North Island was also the site of the first night flight, and the home of the first aircraft carrier, the USS Langley.

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2002
Image Caption: USS George Washington and USS Ronald Reagan pierside at Naval Air Station North Island
Oakland Airport Modern Aerial View
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 19251 Airport DrOaklandState: CACountry: USAWebsite: https://info.aiaa.org/tac/ETMG/HISTC/Shared%20Documents/Historic%20Aerospace%20Sites%20(HAS)/Procedures%20and%20templates/Sites-by-state-plaque-wording.doc

This site, formerly known as Oakland Municipal Airport, served as the gateway to the Pacific during aviation’s pioneering age of trans-Pacific flight. Among other notable events, Albert Hegenberger and Lester Maitland departed from the airfield on 28 June 1927 on the first flight from the mainland to Hawaii, and Amelia Earhart landed here on 13 January 1935, completing the first-ever solo flight from Hawaii to the mainland.

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2002
Image Caption: Modern Oakland Municipal Airport aerial view
The Boeing Red Barn taken in 1937
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1916The Museum of FlightSeattleState: WACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/SecondaryTwoColumn.aspx?id=26571Creator: Boeing, William E.

This former shipyard was the first home of the The Boeing Company, founded in 1916.  Affectionately called the Red Barn, this structure was built in 1909, and became the historic birthplace of Boeing aircraft production. Starting with the Boeing Model C, all early Boeing production took place in this building. Here, the entrepreneurial spirit of William E.

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2002
Image Credit: public domainImage Caption: The Boeing Red Barn taken in 1937.
frozen foods
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Food ProcessingEra: 1950sDateCreated: 1957Western Regional Research CenterAlbanyState: CACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/frozenfoods.htmlCreator: Western Regional Research Center

Frozen foods have become a staple of the modern diet. Freezing allows consumers to have access to foods previously unavailable or available only seasonally, and it provides convenience for many families. But frozen foods became commonplace only after World War II, in part due to research conducted at the Western Regional Research Center which helped determine the proper time and temperature at which various foods should be frozen to insure their quality and stability.

 

The plaque commemorating the research reads:

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2002
Image Credit: Courtesy USDA/Scott Bauer (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Examples of frozen foods
Dr. Albert Szent-Györgyi
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1936University of Szeged Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical FacultySzegedWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/szentgyorgyi.htmlCreator: Szent-Györgyi, Dr. Albert

Albert Szent-Györgyi (1893-1986), biochemist, pioneered the study of biological oxidation mechanisms during the 1920s. Between 1930 and 1936, while a Professor at Szeged University, he proved that hexuronic acid, which he had previously isolated, is identical with vitamin C and that it could be extracted in kilogram quantities from paprika.

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2002
Image Credit: Von FOTO:FORTEPAN / Semmelweis Egyetem Levéltára, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=50839515Image Caption: Dr. Albert Szent-Györgyi circa 1948.
First Transatlantic Reception of a Television Signal via Satellite
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1962Parc du Radôme
Pleumeur-BodouCountry: FranceWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Transatlantic_Reception_of_a_Television_Signal_via_Satellite,_1962

On 11 July 1962 a station in Pimsleur-Bodou received the first transatlantic transmission of a TV signal from a twin station in Andover, Maine, USA via the TELSTAR satellite. The success of TELSTAR and the earth stations, the first built for active satellite communications, illustrated the potential of a future world-wide satellite system to provide communications between continents.

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2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Nicholas Lannuzel (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Radome in Pimsleur-Bodou.Era_date_from: 1962
Pioneering Work on the Quartz Electronic Wristwatch
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1962-1967Cantonal ObservatoryNeuchâtelCountry: SwitzerlandWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Pioneering_Work_on_the_Quartz_Electronic_Wristwatch,_1962-1967Creator: Centre Electronique Horloger

A key milestone in development of the quartz electronic wristwatch in Switzerland was the creation in 1962 of the Centre Electronique Horloger of Neuchâtel. The Centre produced the first prototypes incorporating dedicated integrated circuits that set new timekeeping performance records at the International Chronometric Competition held at this observatory in 1967. Since then quartz watches, with hundreds of millions of units produced, became an extremely successful electronic system.

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2002
Image Credit: Courtesy IEEEImage Caption: The Centre Electronique HorlogerEra_date_from: 1962
Five Stone Arch Bridges
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1830-1860HillsboroughState: NHZip: 03244Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Five-Stone-Arch-Bridges/

"Some of New Hampshire's most aesthetically pleasing yet least appreciated structures are stone arch bridges."

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2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Glass_house (CC BY-SA 2.0) Image Caption: The Gleason Falls Bridges, built in 1830, stands as a testament to the durability of dry-laid stone arches.Era_date_from: 1830
East Maui Irrigation System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1876-1923East MauiState: HICountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/East-Maui-Irrigation-System/Creator: Henry Perrine Baldwin

The East Maui Irrigation System is Hawaii's most dramatic water story. It began with the construction of the Old Hamakua Ditch built between 1876 and 1878. This privately financed, constructed and managed irrigation system was one of the largest in the United States. It eventually included 50 miles of tunnels; 24 miles of open ditches, inverted siphons and flumes; incorporates approximately 400 intakes and 8 reservoirs.

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2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Will Scullin (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: East Maui Irrigation DitchEra_date_from: 1876
Louisville and Portland Canal Locks & Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1830LouisvilleState: KYZip: 40202Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Louisville-and-Portland-Canal-Locks---Dam/Creator: Louisville and Portland Canal Company

Chartered in 1825, the Louisville and Portland Canal Company was authorized to construct a canal around the rapids called the "Falls of the Ohio." Construction started on March 1, 1826. The canal and first generation of locks were completed in 1830. As originally constructed, the canal was 1.9 miles long, 64 feet wide, and terminated at its lower end with a three-flight lock system with a total lift of 26 feet. Each lock chamber was 198 feet long between miter posts, with available length for vessels of 183 feet, width of 52 feet, and a lift at low stages of 8.5 feet.

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2002
Image Credit: public domainImage Caption: The Louisville and Portland Canal was completed in 1830.Era_date_from: 1830
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