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1962

Rachel Carson
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: EducationEra: 1960sDateCreated: 1962Chatham UniversityPittsburghState: PACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/rachel-carson-silent-spring.htmlCreator: Carson, Rachel

Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, published in 1962, was a landmark in the development of the modern environmental movement. Carson’s scientific perspective and rigor created a work of substantial depth and credibility that sparked widespread debate within the scientific community and the broader public about the effect of pesticides on the natural world. These discussions led to new policies that protect our air, our water, and, ultimately, our health and safety.

YearAdded:
2012
Image Caption: Rachel Louise Carson (May 27, 1907 – April 14, 1964) was an American marine biologist, author, and conservationist whose book Silent Spring and other writings are credited with advancing the global environmental movement.
First Transatlantic Reception of a Television Signal via Satellite
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1962Parc du Radôme
Pleumeur-BodouCountry: FranceWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Transatlantic_Reception_of_a_Television_Signal_via_Satellite,_1962

On 11 July 1962 a station in Pimsleur-Bodou received the first transatlantic transmission of a TV signal from a twin station in Andover, Maine, USA via the TELSTAR satellite. The success of TELSTAR and the earth stations, the first built for active satellite communications, illustrated the potential of a future world-wide satellite system to provide communications between continents.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Nicholas Lannuzel (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Radome in Pimsleur-Bodou.Era_date_from: 1962
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalSub Category: Nuclear and Plasma SciencesEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1962Stanford Linear AcceleratorPortola ValleyState: CAZip: 94028Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Stanford_Linear_Accelerator_Center,_1962Creator: Stanford University

The basic research tool at SLAC is an intense beam of electrons that have been accelerated by an electric field equivalent to 30 billion volts, making this the most powerful electron beam in the world.

The two-mile linear accelerator produces this field using high-power microwaves traveling through an evacuated waveguide. Electrons injected into one end of this pipe are continuously accelerated by this traveling field to very high energies.

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Jvimal (CC BY 3.0)Image Caption: Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)Era_date_from: 1962
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Research and DevelopmentEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1962Stanford Linear AcceleratorMenlo ParkState: CAZip: 94028Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/research-and-development/-92-stanford-linear-accelerator-center-%281962%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/f8e54d6f-6e0d-4f7d-ad3a-ff357142f07b/92-Stanford-Linear-Accelerator-Center-1962.aspxCreator: Stanford University

The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was renamed in 2009 to the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Notable for: unique electromechanical devices and systems in the longest accelerator in the world

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Jeff Keyser (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Stanford Linear Accelerator CenterEra_date_from: 1962
NS Savannah
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 19624601 Newgate AveBaltimoreState: MDZip: 21224Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/87-ns-savannahCreator: New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Babcock & Wilcox Company

The N.S. Savannah was the first nuclear-powered cargo-passenger ship, built by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation at Camden, New Jersey. The 74 maximum-power thermal megawatt pressurized-water reactor was supplied by the Babcock & Wilcox Company. Nearly 600 feet long with 22,000-tons displacement, the ship at top speed surged along at 24 knots, with more than 22,300 shaft horsepower to a single propeller. A joint venture by the U.S. Maritime Administration and the Atomic Energy Commission to the design of George G. Sharp Inc.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Public Domain (U.S. Government)Image Caption: NS SavannahEra_date_from: 1962
Neil Bartlett and the Reactive Noble Gases
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Frontiers of KnowledgeEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1962Dept of ChemistryVancouverState: BCZip: V6T 1Z1Country: CanadaWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/bartlettnoblegases.htmlCreator: Bartlett, Neil

In 1962 Neil Bartlett demonstrated the first reaction of a noble gas. The noble gas family of elements - helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon, and radon - had previously been regarded as inert. By combining xenon with a platinum fluoride, Bartlett created the first noble gas compound. This reaction began the field of noble gas chemistry, which became fundamental to the scientific understanding of the chemical bond. Noble gas compounds have helped create anti-tumor agents and have been used in lasers.

YearAdded:
2006
Image Credit: Image courtesy University of British Columbia Library.Image Caption: Neil Bartlett and the Reactive Noble GasesEra_date_from: 1962
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1962509 Northwest 60th StreetWest MineralState: KSZip: 66782Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/minerals-extraction-and-refining/-127-big-brutus-mine-shovel-%281962%29Creator: Bucyrus Erie Company
When built in 1962, this shovel was the second largest in the world. It was used for the removal of overburden in the surface mining of thin coal seams. In its lifetime, it recovered nine million tons of bituminous coal from depths of 20 to 50 feet for local electric power generation. Standing 160-feet high, weighing 5,500 tons, and moving at speeds up to two-tenths of a mile per hour, the machine stripped about a square mile each year.
YearAdded:
1987
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/KellyK (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: This picture of the Big Brutus Mine Shovel does not fully capture its immensity. To create a comparison, the average person would be slightly shorter than the treads, near the bottom.Era_date_from: 1962
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalSub Category: CommunicationsEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1962Shirley's Bay Research CentreOttawaState: OntarioZip: K2KCountry: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Alouette-ISIS_Satellite_Program,_1962Creator: Defense Telecommunications Establishment Electronics Lab
"Driven by the need to understand the characteristics of radio communication in Canada's North, Canadian researchers focused on the exploration of the earth's upper atmosphere, the ionosphere. Canada's satellite program commenced with the launch of Alouette-I on September 29, 1962. Alouette-II followed in 1965, ISIS-I in 1969, ISIS-II in 1971. The Alouette/ISIS tracking antenna serves as a reminder of Canada's contribution to this international effort in space science.
YearAdded:
1993
Image Credit: Public Domain; NASAImage Caption: The The Alouette 1, the very first satellite constructed by CanadaEra_date_from: 1962
Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar Apparatus
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Materials Handling & ExtractionEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1962Southwest Research InstituteSan AntonioState: TXZip: 28510Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/materials-handling-and-excavation/-242-split-hopkinson-pressure-bar-apparatus-%281962%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/a82d72ab-e923-4aa9-a296-784c3fb7463a/242-Split-Hopkinson-Pressure-Bar-Apparatus.aspxCreator: Lindholm, Ulric

The Southwest Research Institute Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus is a mechanical test instrument used to characterize the dynamic response of materials at high strain rates (typical of impacts and explosions).

The apparatus, based on devices invented by Bertram Hopkinson and Herbert Kolsky, was developed at SwRI in 1962 by Dr. Ulric Lindholm. Initially created to evaluate the behavior of metals under various conditions, the SwRI Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar has since been applied to a wide range of materials.

YearAdded:
2006
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar ApparatusEra_date_from: 1962
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