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Pressure

Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1922Cameron World HeadquartersHoustonState: TXZip: 77041Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/minerals-extraction-and-refining/-227-first-ram-type-blowout-preventer-%28bop%29-%281922%29Creator: Abercrombie, James, Cameron, Harry
This mechanism allowed the manual closing of a well, saved lives and prevented surface oil accumulation at drilling sites, quickly becoming an industry standard. In the early days of oilfield operations, there was no way to control the underground pressures encountered during drilling. When an oil or gas reservoir was tapped, wells were allowed to "blow out" until pressure was reduced sufficiently to allow capping. Many inventors attempted to develop a device to control such blowouts. In 1922, oil wildcatter James Smither Abercrombie (1891-1975) and machinist Harry S.
YearAdded:
2003
Image Credit: Original Image: Flickr/Ed Schipul (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: A modern Blowout Preventer (BOP)Era_date_from: 1922
Pelton Impulse Water Wheel
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Power GenerationEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1878CamptonvilleState: CACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Pelton-Impulse-Water-Wheel/Creator: Pelton, Lester

Water wheels have been used to power mills and pumps for centuries. However, the traditional water wheel was inefficient: water hitting a bucket would splash back against the next bucket, slowing the wheel. This is especially true when water is delivered to the buckets under very high pressure.

YearAdded:
1973
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Pelton Impulse Water WheelEra_date_from: 1878
Newcomen Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1700-1749DateCreated: 1712Dartmouth MuseumDevonZip: 01803 832923Country: UKWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-70-newcomen-engine-%281712%29Creator: Newcomen, Thomas, Calley, John

The unprecedented innovation of the steam-atmospheric engine by Thomas Newcomen (1663-1729) of Dartmouth and his assistant John Calley stands at the beginning of the development of practical thermal prime movers in the early years of the eighteenth century. Spreading through Europe and then to the Cornwall mines in the New World, it was one of the strategic innovations in world history and the single greatest act of synthesis in the ensuing history of the steam engine.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Charles Pence (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: A surviving example of the Newcomen Steam Engine, in the Henry Ford Museum (Dearborn, Michigan).Era_date_from: 1712
Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar Apparatus
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Materials Handling & ExtractionEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1962Southwest Research InstituteSan AntonioState: TXZip: 28510Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/materials-handling-and-excavation/-242-split-hopkinson-pressure-bar-apparatus-%281962%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/a82d72ab-e923-4aa9-a296-784c3fb7463a/242-Split-Hopkinson-Pressure-Bar-Apparatus.aspxCreator: Lindholm, Ulric

The Southwest Research Institute Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus is a mechanical test instrument used to characterize the dynamic response of materials at high strain rates (typical of impacts and explosions).

The apparatus, based on devices invented by Bertram Hopkinson and Herbert Kolsky, was developed at SwRI in 1962 by Dr. Ulric Lindholm. Initially created to evaluate the behavior of metals under various conditions, the SwRI Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar has since been applied to a wide range of materials.

YearAdded:
2006
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar ApparatusEra_date_from: 1962
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