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captured Focke Wulf Fw 190A-3 at the Royal Aircraft Establishment
Society: AIAA Main Category: Aerospace & Aviation Sub Category: Aerospace Era: 1900s DateCreated: 1905 State: Zip: Country: UK Website: Creator:

Farnborough's aeronautical history began in 1905 with the arrival of HM Balloon Factory in 1905, headed by Lt Col J.L.B. Templer. In 1908, the first powered aeroplane flight in Great Britain took place here, piloted by Samuel Cody. In 1912, Lord Trenchard established the first headquarters of the Royal Flying Corps and in 1918 the Royal Aircraft Establishment was founded.

YearAdded:
2004
Image Credit: Image Caption: A captured Focke Wulf Fw 190A-3 at the Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough, with the RAE's chief test pilot, Wing Commander H J "Willie" Wilson at the controls, August 1942. Era_date_from:
Liverpool Manchester Railway & Site of Rainhill Trials
Society: ASME Main Category: Mechanical Sub Category: Era: 1830-1839 DateCreated: 1830 Rainhill Merseyside State: Zip: Country: UK Website: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/engineering-history/landmarks/263-liverpool-manchester-railway-site-rainhill Creator: Stephenson, Robert

The Rainhill Trials were an important competition in the early d

YearAdded:
2016
Image Credit: Public Domain Image Caption: Rolling stock on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, 1831 Era_date_from:
Ironbridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1750-1799 DateCreated: 1779 Coalbrookdale-Ironbridge State: Zip: TF8 7AL Country: UK Website: http://www.asce.org/project/iron-bridge/ Creator: Darby III, Abraham

This bridge is recognized as the first iron bridge in the world. This rural region of England was an important industrial area thanks to coal deposits near the surface. In 1776 the nearest bridge that enabled people and goods to pass over the River Severn was two miles away at Buildwas. There was a ferry crossing, but the trip was difficult and dangerous especially in winter. In 1776, an Act to build a bridge to remedy this situation received Royal Assent.

YearAdded:
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Jasonjsmith Image Caption: This bridge is recognized as the first iron bridge in the world. Era_date_from: 1779
Forth & Clyde Canal and Union Canal
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Water Transportation Era: 1750-1799 DateCreated: 1768-1790 Forth to Bowling on the Clyde, Scotland Glasgow State: Zip: Country: UK Website: http://www.asce.org/project/forth---clyde-canal/ Creator: Smeaton, John

It took 22 years to complete the 35-mile waterway, as funding problems caused the work to shut down from 1777 to 1785.  

The notion of creating a canal that crossed Scotland was conceived in the 17th century during the reign of Charles II, but would not be realized for nearly 100 years.  The Forth and Clyde Canal, known as The Great Canal in its early years, was the first major transportation project in Scotland and the world's first man-made, sea-to-sea ship canal.   

YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Michel Van den Berghe (CC BY-SA 2.0) Image Caption: The Forth and Clyde Canal, known as The Great Canal in its early years, was the first major transportation project in Scotland and the world's first man-made, sea-to-sea ship canal. Era_date_from: 1768
Firth of Forth Railway Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1890-1899 DateCreated: 1890 Queensferry State: Zip: EH30 9SF Country: UK Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Firth-of-Forth-Railway-Bridge/ Creator: Benjamin, Baker

"The majestic Forth Bridge ... symbolises the tremendous achievements of Victorian engineers and the immense strides made in the technique of bridge design and construction since the dawn of the Railway Age..."
 - Derrick Bennett, Bridges: Great Buildings of the World

YearAdded:
1985
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Brain M Forbes (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: The Forth Bridge became the longest bridge in the world when it was completed in 1890. Era_date_from: 1890
Pegasus 3 Engine BS 916
Society: ASME Main Category: Aerospace & Aviation Sub Category: Aerospace Era: 1960-1969 DateCreated: 1993 Rolls Royce PLC
Bristol State: BC Zip: BS34 7QE Country: UK Website: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/--168-pegasus-3-engine-bs-916-%281960%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/f2e04cf6-f24f-4633-bb2f-ef61c5deb500/168-Pegasus-3-Engine-BS-916.aspx Creator: Bristol Aero-Engines Ltd. (now part of Rolls-Royce), Hooker, Stanley

The Pegasus 3 is the earliest surviving example of the prototype engine for vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) jets, namely the Royal Air Force's Harriers and US Marine Corps' AV-8Bs. Owned by the Rolls- Royce Heritage Trust (a company-sponsored history and preservation society), the artifact is an early developmental model of the Pegasus 3 engine, the first to fly with sufficient thrust to prove the vectored-thrust concept for V/STOL jet aircraft, in 1960.

YearAdded:
1993
Image Credit: Courtesy ASME Image Caption: The earliest surviving example of the prototype engine for vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) jets, namely Harriers and AV-8Bs. Era_date_from: 1993
Turbinia
Society: ASME Main Category: Mechanical Sub Category: Water Transportation Era: 1890-1899 DateCreated: 1897 Tyne and Wear Museums Service Newcastle upon Tyne State: Zip: NE1 4 Country: UK Website: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-73-turbinia-%281897%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/49f372ec-0fe3-4447-bcc2-30b5b58e7032/73-Turbinia-1897.aspx Creator: Parsons, Charles Algernon, Parsons Marine Steam Turbine Company

The Turbinia was the world's first turbine-driven ship. It attracted worldwide attention at the 1897 Spithead Naval Review by traveling more than 34 knots. This remarkable performance accelerated the acceptance of the steam turbine as an alternative to the steam reciprocating engine on ships as well as for central electric light and power stations. Sir Charles A. Parsons (1854-1931) invented (1884), developed, and promoted the steam turbine, as well as the design of the Turbinia. For this, he is considered among the outstanding technological innovators of all time.

YearAdded:
1982
Image Credit: Public Domain (Copyright Expired) Image Caption: Turbinia Era_date_from: 1897
Thames Tunnel
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Tunnels Era: 1840-1849 DateCreated: 1843 Beneath the Thames River London State: Zip: Country: UK Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Thames-Tunnel/ Creator: Brunel, Marc Isambard , Brunel, Isambard Kingdom

By the turn of the 19th century, London's streets were clogged with traffic. Over 3,700 passengers used the Thames River's main boat crossing each day, while wagons and carts were forced to cross via the London Bridge, two miles away. Building a bridge would further impede shipping on the already-crowded Thames; a tunnel was the obvious alternative.

The first attempt at a tunnel in the present location began in 1807. The excavation had proceeded only 1,000 feet-using traditional mining methods-when crews reached a layer of quicksand and were forced to stop.

YearAdded:
1991
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Annie Mole (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: Thames Tunnel Era_date_from: 1843
Menai Suspension Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1800-1829 DateCreated: 1826 Menai Bridge Isle of Anglesey State: Wales Zip: Country: UK Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Menai-Suspension-Bridge/ Creator: Telford, Thomas , Hazledine, William

Built between 1819 and 1826, the Menai Bridge was the major structure on Britain's strategically important Holyhead Road connecting London with Holyhead and by sea to Ireland. Designed by Thomas Telford, the bridge's main span was 579 feet from tower to tower, the longest that had ever been attempted at this time. He used four sets wrought-iron eyebars to suspend the deck. These were made by William Hazledine at his Upton forge near Shrewsbury. Each bar was carefully tested in his Coleham shops before being pinned together and lifted into place.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Ingy the Wingy (CC BY-ND 2.0) Image Caption: Menai Suspension Bridge Era_date_from: 1826
SS Great Britain
Society: ASME Main Category: Mechanical Sub Category: Water Transportation Era: 1840-1849 DateCreated: 1843 Great Western Dockyard Bristol State: Zip: BS1 6TY Country: UK Website: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-97-ss-great-britain-%281843%29 Creator: Patterson, William

The innovative SS Great Britain, launched in 1843, was the first iron-hulled, screw-propelled ship to cross any ocean and led mercantile history into British domination in the late nineteenth century. Standard practice of naval and merchant ship construction derived from this ship. The compartmented hull, unprecedented 1,500-horsepower engine with chain drive, and many other seminal features were the designs of Isambard Kingdom Brunel. New design features included a balanced rudder, an electric log, a double bottom, and water-tight bulkheads.

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Terry Whalebone (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: SS Great Britain Era_date_from: 1843
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