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Suspension

Waldo-Hancock Suspension Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1931 Penobscot River Stockton Springs State: ME Zip: E 04981 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Waldo-Hancock-Suspension-Bridge/ Creator: Steinman, David

Designed by David B. Steinman, of Robinson & Steinman, New York City, the Waldo-Hancock suspension Bridge is a significant example of Steinman's work. David Steinman is considered among the most important suspension bridge designers of the 20th century. He earned an engineering degree from Columbia University in 1909 and went on to apprentice with Gustav Lindenthal, then at work on New York's Hell Gate Bridge. In the 1920's, Steinman emerged as an outstanding and innovative suspension bridge designer.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Justin Russell (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: Waldo-Hancock Suspension Bridge Era_date_from: 1931
Triborough Bridge Project
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1936 Robert F. Kennedy Bridge New York State: NY Zip: 10035 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Triborough-Bridge-Project/ Creator: Moses, Robert , Ammann, Othmar

The Triborough Bridge Project is a three-branched waterway crossing that connects Manhattan, the Bronx, and Queens at a junction of the East River and the Harlem River in New York City. The complex structure includes a suspension bridge from Wards Island to Queens, a vertical lift span from Randall's Island to Manhattan, a fixed span (designed to be convertible to a lift span) across the Bronx Kills, viaducts, and an innovative three-legged roadway interchange.

YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service) Image Caption: Triborough Bridge Project Era_date_from: 1936
Menai Suspension Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1800-1829 DateCreated: 1826 Menai Bridge Isle of Anglesey State: Wales Zip: Country: UK Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Menai-Suspension-Bridge/ Creator: Telford, Thomas , Hazledine, William

Built between 1819 and 1826, the Menai Bridge was the major structure on Britain's strategically important Holyhead Road connecting London with Holyhead and by sea to Ireland. Designed by Thomas Telford, the bridge's main span was 579 feet from tower to tower, the longest that had ever been attempted at this time. He used four sets wrought-iron eyebars to suspend the deck. These were made by William Hazledine at his Upton forge near Shrewsbury. Each bar was carefully tested in his Coleham shops before being pinned together and lifted into place.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Ingy the Wingy (CC BY-ND 2.0) Image Caption: Menai Suspension Bridge Era_date_from: 1826
Manhattan Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1900-1909 DateCreated: 1909 Manhattan Bridge Brooklyn State: NY Zip: 11201 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/manhattan-bridge/ Creator: Nichols, Othniel Foster , Moisseiff, Leon

When opened in 1909, the 1,470 foot long main span of the Manhattan Bridge was the third longest suspension bridge span in the world, after the nearby Brooklyn and Williamsburg Bridges. The Manhattan Bridge has two 725 foot long suspended side spans for an overall length of 2,920 feet. The bridge deck is supported by 4 main cables of 20.75 inch diameter, each composed of more than 35,000 individual wires. The bridge deck is stiffened by four parallel trusses of 24 foot depth, hinged at the towers.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Dave Herholz (CC BY-SA 2.0) Image Caption: Manhattan Bridge Era_date_from: 1909
Mackinac Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1950-1959 DateCreated: 1958 Mackinac Bridge St Ignace State: MI Zip: 49781 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Mackinac-Bridge/ Creator: Steinman, David

The Mackinac (pronounced "Mack-in-awe") Bridge (1957) spans the Straits of Mackinac between Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, connecting the Lower and Upper peninsulas of Michigan.   Prior to the construction of the bridge, a fleet of nine ferries would carry as many as 9,000 vehicles per day, with traffic backups stretching as long as 16 miles.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Miss a Liss (CC BY-ND 2.0) Image Caption: Mackinac Bridge Era_date_from: 1958
John A. Roebling Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1860-1869 DateCreated: 1866 Ohio River Cincinnati State: OH Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/John-A--Roebling-Bridge/ Creator: Roebling, John

In 1866, the Covington and Cincinnati Suspension Bridge was the largest suspension bridge in the world. Also called the Ohio Bridge, it was officially renamed the John A. Roebling Bridge in 1983. It was the first permanent bridge over the Ohio River and the only public project in America financed by private investors during the Civil War.

Renowned bridge designer John A. Roebling proposed the structure in 1846; but building the bridge would become a 20-year saga, with heated lobbying both for and against the crossing.

YearAdded:
1982
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Tom Hamilton (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: John A. Roebling Bridge Era_date_from: 1866
Golden Gate Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1937 Golden Gate National Recreation Area Mill Valley State: CA Zip: 94941 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Golden-Gate-Bridge/ Creator: Ellis, Charles , Strauss, Joseph

Put in service in 1937, this world-renowned bridge, conceived by Joseph Strauss and designed largely by Charles Ellis, was the longest single span (4,200 feet) in the world for a quarter century.

As with many civil engineering projects in their conceptual stages, naysayers scoffed at the Golden Gate Bridge. They said it would be technically unfeasible or too expensive to bridge the Golden Gate, a 1.7-mile-wide opening separating the Pacific Ocean from the San Francisco Bay. They said that the channel was too deep; the tides and winds too strong; the span too long.

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Salim Virji (CC BY-SA 2.0) Image Caption: Golden Gate Bridge Era_date_from: 1937
Wheeling Suspension Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1840-1849 DateCreated: 1848 Ohio River Wheeling State: WV Zip: 26003 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Wheeling-Suspension-Bridge/ Creator: Ellet, Charles

The Wheeling Suspension Bridge was the first bridge to span the Ohio River. It was initially completed in 1849, but destroyed by a tornado five years later. The bridge was rebuilt in 1856. The replacement bridge has the same general appearance of the original structure; the massive towers, anchorage housings, and island approach are all the original stone masonry.

YearAdded:
1968
Image Credit: Photo by Edwin S. Grosvenor (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: Wheeling Suspension Bridge Era_date_from: 1848
Conwy Suspension Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1800-1829 DateCreated: 1826 River Conwy State: North Wales Zip: Country: UK Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Conwy-Suspension-Bridge/ Creator: Telford, Thomas

When a new road bridge was constructed alongside it, plans were made to demolish the Conwy Suspension Bridge. There was a national outcry and, since 1958, the bridge has been in the care of the National Trust and closed to vehicular traffic.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Verity Cridland (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: Conwy Suspension Bridge Era_date_from: 1826
George Washington Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1931 George Washington Bridge Fort Lee State: NJ Zip: 07024 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/George-Washington-Bridge/ Creator: Ammann, Othmar

"An essential part of the human experience is to create an aesthetic atmosphere."

The George Washington Bridge represented a departure in suspension bridge design. Chief Engineer O.H. Ammann developed a system of stiffening trusses that offered greater flexibility and saved the project nearly $10 million. Initially, just six of the upper eight lanes were paved, but Ammann designed the bridge to easily accommodate a future lower level.

Swiss-born O.H. Ammann (1879-1965) was Chief Engineer for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey during the bridge's construction. 

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Original Image: Flickr/Marcin Wichary Image Caption: George Washington Bridge Era_date_from: 1931
Subscribe to Suspension

Innovations

George Washington Bridge

"An essential part of the human experience is to create an aesthetic atmosphere."

The George Washington Bridge represented a departure in suspension bridge design. Chief Engineer O.H. Ammann developed a system of stiffening trusses that offered greater flexibility and saved the project…

Read More
Conwy Suspension Bridge

When a new road bridge was constructed alongside it, plans were made to demolish the Conwy Suspension Bridge. There was a national outcry and, since 1958, the bridge has been in the care of the National Trust and closed to vehicular traffic.

Designed by Thomas Telford in the gothic…

Read More
Wheeling Suspension Bridge

The Wheeling Suspension Bridge was the first bridge to span the Ohio River. It was initially completed in 1849, but destroyed by a tornado five years later. The bridge was rebuilt in 1856. The replacement bridge has the same general appearance of the original structure; the massive towers,…

Read More
Golden Gate Bridge

Put in service in 1937, this world-renowned bridge, conceived by Joseph Strauss and designed largely by Charles Ellis, was the longest single span (4,200 feet) in the world for a quarter century.

As with many civil engineering projects in their conceptual stages, naysayers scoffed at the…

Read More
John A. Roebling Bridge

In 1866, the Covington and Cincinnati Suspension Bridge was the largest suspension bridge in the world. Also called the Ohio Bridge, it was officially renamed the John A. Roebling Bridge in 1983. It was the first permanent bridge over the Ohio River and the only public project in America…

Read More
Mackinac Bridge

The Mackinac (pronounced "Mack-in-awe") Bridge (1957) spans the Straits of Mackinac between Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, connecting the Lower and Upper peninsulas of Michigan.   Prior to the construction of the bridge, a fleet of nine ferries would carry as many as 9,000 vehicles per day, with…

Read More
Manhattan Bridge

When opened in 1909, the 1,470 foot long main span of the Manhattan Bridge was the third longest suspension bridge span in the world, after the nearby Brooklyn and Williamsburg Bridges. The Manhattan Bridge has two 725 foot long suspended side spans for an overall length of 2,920 feet. The…

Read More
Menai Suspension Bridge

Built between 1819 and 1826, the Menai Bridge was the major structure on Britain's strategically important Holyhead Road connecting London with Holyhead and by sea to Ireland. Designed by Thomas Telford, the bridge's main span was 579 feet from tower to tower, the longest that had ever been…

Read More
Triborough Bridge Project

The Triborough Bridge Project is a three-branched waterway crossing that connects Manhattan, the Bronx, and Queens at a junction of the East River and the Harlem River in New York City. The complex structure includes a suspension bridge from Wards Island to Queens, a vertical lift span from…

Read More
Waldo-Hancock Suspension Bridge

Designed by David B. Steinman, of Robinson & Steinman, New York City, the Waldo-Hancock suspension Bridge is a significant example of Steinman's work. David Steinman is considered among the most important suspension bridge designers of the 20th century. He earned an engineering degree from…

Read More

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