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1860-1869

Ashuelot Covered Bridge
Society: Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1860-1869 DateCreated: 1865 20 Hampshire Ct, , NH Ashuelot State: NH Zip: 03441 Country: USA Website: Creator:

The Ashuelot Covered Bridge is located at the center of Ashuelot, NH. It is a Town lattice truss bridge, spanning the Ashuelot River in a roughly north-south orientation. It consists of two spans with a total length of 178 feet (54 m). The total width of the bridge is 29 feet (8.8 m), and has a central roadway and sidewalks (measuring 3'10" in width) on each side. The bridge rests on stone abutments and a central pier. The abutments have been reinforced with concrete since the bridge was built, and the central pier has been protected by a metal breakwater.

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Image Credit: Edwin S. Grosvenor Image Caption: Era_date_from:
Hunley submarine
Society: ASM Main Category: Manufacturing Sub Category: Materials Handling & Extraction Era: 1860-1869 DateCreated: 2007 Charleston State: SC Zip: Country: USA Website: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._L._Hunley_(submarine) Creator: Hunley, H.L.

In the context of naval warfare, H.L. Hunley changed the world.  Its builders' innovative use of materials, design and manufacturing techniques resulted in the world's first successful attack submarine.

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2007
Image Credit: Edwin Grosvenor Image Caption: Era_date_from: 1860
Society: Main Category: Sub Category: Era: DateCreated: State: Zip: Country: Website: Creator:

Most great monuments of nineteenth-century American engineering, such as the Brooklyn Bridge, dominate the surrounding landscape. By contrast, the Hoosac Tunnel, dug through a mountain in western Massachusetts, is inconspicuous, as tunnels naturally are. Yet it stands in the front rank of the projects of its age by whatever standards of measurement one chooses. On the one hand, its construction, which began in 1851 and ended in 1875, took almost two hundred lives, damaged many reputations, and nearly claimed the solvency of the commonwealth of Massachusetts.

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Society: IEEE Main Category: Electric Sub Category: Era: 1860-1869 DateCreated: 1866 County Kerry State: Zip: Country: Ireland Website: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:County_Kerry_Transatlantic_Cable_Stations,_1866 Creator:
The discoveries of electricity in the latter half of the 18th Century, and its close connection with magnetism, were the products of earlier experiments, which in turn led to the invention of the electric telegraph. Telegraphy had connected the interior of the United States, and it also connected Europe together. However, connecting the Americas and Europe proved to be a challenge. Due to the electric current that ran through the cable lines, insulation and waterproofing was necessary.
YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Courtesy IEEE Image Caption: The County Kerry Cable Stations Era_date_from: 1866
Joining of the Rails - Transcontinental Railroad
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Rail Transportation Era: 1860-1869 DateCreated: 1869 Golden Spike Rd Promontory State: UT Zip: 84307 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/joining-of-the-rails--transcontinental-rr/ Creator: Union Pacific Railroad, Central Pacific Railroad

"May God continue the unity of our Country as this Railroad unites the two great Oceans of the world."  
- Inscription on the ceremonial Golden Spike 

The symbolic Golden Spike, staked in Promontory, Utah in 1869, marked the completion of the first transcontinental railroad, joining the Union Pacific Railroad from the East and the Central Pacific Railroad from the west. 

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Image Credit: Courtesy of the National Park Service Image Caption: A crowd of 1,500 assembled in Promontory for the ceremony to join the rails and, symbolically, the nation. Era_date_from: 1869
Chesbrough's Water Supply System
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Era: 1860-1869 DateCreated: 1864-1869 Chicago State: IL Zip: 60604 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/chesbrough-s-chicago-water-supply-system/ Creator: Chesbrough, Ellis

Constructed to provide a safe, potable water supply for the citizens of Chicago, Ellis Chesbrough's Chicago Water Supply System was the first major system to utilize offshore intake systems. The system includes the landmark Chicago Water Tower and the Chicago Avenue Pumping Station. Its subaqueous tunnel was a pioneering effort in American civil engineering.

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1972
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Wickdrew Image Caption: Ellis Chesbrough's Chicago Water Supply System was the first major system to utilize offshore intake systems. Era_date_from: 1864
Watkins Woolen Mill
Society: ASME Main Category: Mechanical Sub Category: Manufacturing Era: 1860-1869 DateCreated: 1868 Watkins Woolen Mill State Park Kearney State: MO Zip: 64060 Country: USA Website: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/-43-watkins-woolen-mill-%281868%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/705d5611-da21-47b3-b584-1e33e1c0b9df/43-Watkins-Woolen-Mill.aspx Creator: Watkins, Waltus

The Watkins Woolen Mill is among the best preserved examples of a Midwest woolen mill in nineteenth-century United States. Its machinery for preparing, spinning, and weaving wool reflects the existence of well-established textile industry in the country. It was designed and built by Waltus L. Watkins (1806-1884), a machinist and master weaver from Frankfort, Kentucky, who began operating his mill in 1861 in Clay County.

YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service) Image Caption: Watkins Woolen Mill Era_date_from: 1868
USS Cairo Engine and Boilers
Society: ASME Main Category: Mechanical Sub Category: Water Transportation Era: 1860-1869 DateCreated: 1862 National Battlefield Vicksburg State: MS Zip: 39183 Country: USA Website: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-143-uss-cairo-engine-and-boilers-%281862%29 Creator: Pook, Samuel , Eads, James

The Cairo is the sole survivor of the fleet of river gunboats built by the Union during the Civil War with the object of controlling the lower Mississippi River. Designed by Samuel Pook and built by James B. Eads, it saw limited battle and was sunk on the Yazoo River in 1862 by newly developed electronically detonated mines, becoming the first craft ever sunk by this predecessor to torpedo technology. The 175-foot ironclad vessel had 13 guns.

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Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/James Case (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: USS Cairo Engine and Boilers Era_date_from: 1862
Bollman Truss Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges, Transportation Era: 1860-1869 DateCreated: 1869 Little Patuxent River Savage State: MD Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Bollman-Truss-Bridge/ Creator: Bollman, Wendel

The design of the Bollman Truss Bridge-patented in 1852 and one of the first to use iron exclusively in all essential structural elements-was critical in the rapid expansion of American railroads in the 19th century. Replacing wooden bridges, which  were cumbersome to build and vulnerable to decay, the Bollman Truss Bridge could be built relatively quickly and inexpensively, while providing the long-lasting qualities associated with metal. This allowed new rail lines to be built over long distances in a short period of time.

YearAdded:
1966
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Andrew Bossi (CC BY-SA 2.0) Image Caption: Bollman Truss Bridge as it looks today, after the repairs done in 1934-84. Era_date_from: 1869
Central Pacific Railroad
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Roads & Rails Era: 1860-1869 DateCreated: 1863-1869 Western America Ogden State: UT Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/central-pacific-railroad/ Creator: Judah, Theodore , Crocker, Charles

Central Pacific Railroad served as the Western terminus of America's first transcontinental railroad, passing through the formidable Sierra Nevada Mountains. In all, 15 tunnels were blasted through solid granite. 

Thousands of Chinese from Kwantung Province were recruited by Central Pacific Railroad Company and became known for their diligence and hard work. In the second year of construction, nine out of ten workers on the CPRR were Chinese.

YearAdded:
1968
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Jim Bowen (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: Central Pacific Railroad Era_date_from: 1863
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Innovations

Rumford Baking Powder

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Bridgeport Covered Bridge

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Chandler Chemistry Laboratory

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Cooper Steam Traction Engine Collection

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Cornish - Windsor Covered Bridge

The Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge is the longest wooden bridge in the United States and the longest two-span, covered bridge in the world. It is also a classic example of wooden bridge-building in 19th-century America. With copious supplies of timber at hand and a generous reserve of carpentry…

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John A. Roebling Bridge

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Hacienda La Esperanza Sugar Mill Steam Engine

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Minot's Ledge Lighthouse

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The light, constructed on tall iron legs…

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The Tabernacle in December 2008

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Moseley Wrought Iron Arch Bridge

Designed, patented, and built by Thomas W.H. Moseley, this arched 96-foot span bridge preceded by years the standard use of wrought iron for bridges. For the first time in the United States, Moseley incorporated the use of riveted wrought-iron plates for the triangular-shaped top chord.

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Mullan Road

The Mullan Road was designed to facilitate the movement of troops and supplies across the Rocky Mountains between the Missouri River basin in the Great Plains and the Columbia River Basin at the Columbia Plateau during times of Indian hostilities. But because peace was reached with the Northwest…

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Suez Canal Project

The idea of creating a canal linking the Mediterranean Sea to the Red Sea is a very old one that dates back about 4000 years to the ancient Egyptians. They thought of linking the two seas by using the River Nile and its branches. It was this very old desire that led to the digging of the present…

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Central Pacific Railroad

Central Pacific Railroad served as the Western terminus of America's first transcontinental railroad, passing through the formidable Sierra Nevada Mountains. In all, 15 tunnels were blasted through solid granite. 

Thousands of Chinese from Kwantung Province were recruited by Central…

Read More
Bollman Truss Bridge

The design of the Bollman Truss Bridge-patented in 1852 and one of the first to use iron exclusively in all essential structural elements-was critical in the rapid expansion of American railroads in the 19th century. Replacing wooden bridges, which  were cumbersome to build and vulnerable to…

Read More
USS Cairo Engine and Boilers

The Cairo is the sole survivor of the fleet of river gunboats built by the Union during the Civil War with the object of controlling the lower Mississippi River. Designed by Samuel Pook and built by James B. Eads, it saw limited battle and was sunk on the Yazoo River in 1862 by newly developed…

Read More
Watkins Woolen Mill

The Watkins Woolen Mill is among the best preserved examples of a Midwest woolen mill in nineteenth-century United States. Its machinery for preparing, spinning, and weaving wool reflects the existence of well-established textile industry in the country. It was designed and built by Waltus L.…

Read More
Chesbrough's Water Supply System

Constructed to provide a safe, potable water supply for the citizens of Chicago, Ellis Chesbrough's Chicago Water Supply System was the first major system to utilize offshore intake systems. The system includes the landmark Chicago Water Tower and the Chicago Avenue Pumping Station. Its…

Read More
Joining of the Rails - Transcontinental Railroad

"May God continue the unity of our Country as this Railroad unites the two great Oceans of the world."  
- Inscription on the ceremonial Golden Spike 

The symbolic Golden Spike, staked in Promontory, Utah in 1869, marked the completion of the first transcontinental railroad,…

Read More

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