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Ireland

Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1866County KerryCountry: IrelandWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:County_Kerry_Transatlantic_Cable_Stations,_1866
The discoveries of electricity in the latter half of the 18th Century, and its close connection with magnetism, were the products of earlier experiments, which in turn led to the invention of the electric telegraph. Telegraphy had connected the interior of the United States, and it also connected Europe together. However, connecting the Americas and Europe proved to be a challenge. Due to the electric current that ran through the cable lines, insulation and waterproofing was necessary.
YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Courtesy IEEEImage Caption: The County Kerry Cable StationsEra_date_from: 1866
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricSub Category: EducationEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1836MaynoothCountry: IrelandWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Callan%27s_Pioneering_Contributions_to_Electrical_Science_and_Technology,_1836
A pioneer in the development of electrical science, Nicholas Joseph Callan was born on 22 December 1799 in Darver, Ireland. He started the priesthood at Navan Seminary, and continued his studies at St. Patrick’s College Maynooth, where he studied natural and experimental philosophy under Dr. Cornelius Denvir. After his ordination as priest in 1823, Callan pursued his doctorate in divinity in Rome, where he became acquainted with Galvani and Volta’s work in the study of electricity, and recognized the potential to put it to practical and commercial use with powerful batteries.
Image Credit: Courtesy National University of IrelandImage Caption: Nicholas Joseph Callan made many discoveries during his lifetime; he was the first to establish the link between rate-of-change of current and electromagnetic induction, and discovered the principle of the self-exciting dynamo.Era_date_from: 1836
Dublin-Belfast Rail Link
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1842-1855Dublin to BelfastCountry: IrelandWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Dublin-Belfast-Rail-Link/

The Dublin to Belfast Rail Link established a vital connection between the capitals of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. The line's most notable engineering feature was the 1,760-foot-long Boyne Bridge; it represented one of the earliest uses of calculated stresses, the first large-scale use of wrought iron latticed girders, and the first full scale test of continuous beams. Tests performed on the wrought iron columns and struts were published and provided invaluable information for engineers who would design similar structures in the future. 

YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Henry ClarkImage Caption: The Dublin to Belfast Rail Link established a vital connection between the capitals of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.Era_date_from: 1842
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalSub Category: Fields, Waves & ElectromagneticsEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1836National University of MaynoothState: County KildareCountry: IrelandWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Callan%27s_Pioneering_Contributions_to_Electrical_Science_and_Technology,_1836Creator: Callan, Nicholas
A pioneer in the development of electrical science, Nicholas Joseph Callan was born on 22 December 1799 in Darver, Ireland. He started the priesthood at Navan Seminary, and continued his studies at St. Patrick’s College Maynooth, where he studied natural and experimental philosophy under Dr. Cornelius Denvir. After his ordination as priest in 1823, Callan pursued his doctorate in divinity in Rome, where he became acquainted with Galvani and Volta’s work in the study of electricity, and recognized the potential to put it to practical and commercial use with powerful batteries.
YearAdded:
2006
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Callan's Pioneering Contributions to Electrical Science and TechnologyEra_date_from: 1836
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