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1840-1849

Duck Creek Aqueduct Covered Bridge
Society: Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1840-1849 DateCreated: 1839 19001-19041 Pennington Rd. Metamora State: IN Zip: 47030 Country: USA Website: Creator:

Duck Creek Aqueduct is a rare surviving example of a covered timber aqueduct. It was one of several similar structures on the Whitewater Canal, which operated between the Whitewater Valley and the Ohio River from 1839 to 1865. After being displaced by the railroad, the canal supplied hydraulic power for the industrial districts at Metamora and Brookville.

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Image Credit: Anthony Dillon Image Caption: Era_date_from:
Workers digging an oil well by hand at Bibi-Eibat (Azerbaijan).
Society: SPE Main Category: Petroleum Sub Category: Extraction Era: 1840-1849 DateCreated: 1848 Bibi-Heybat State: Baku Zip: Country: Azerbaijan Website: http://www.spe.org/industry/history/timeline.php Creator: Aleveev, Major

 

On July 14, 1848 in Baku, Azerbaijan, Major Alekseev supervised the completion of a 20+ meter well, reaching a small pocket of crude oil, thus establishing the world’s very first oil well. The process used was an archaic technique known as cable-tool drilling, employed for hundreds of years in ancient China. Major Alekseev acted under the instruction of governor-general Mikhail Semyonovich Vorontsov, who in a memo wrote:

 

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Image Credit: Wikipedia Image Caption: Workers digging an oil well by hand at Bibi-Eibat (Azerbaijan). Era_date_from:
Society: Main Category: Sub Category: Era: DateCreated: State: Zip: Country: Website: Creator:

Two immense side-wheel steamboats lined up a few minutes before 11:00 am on June 1, 1845 at the foot of Vesey Street on the tip of Manhattan. Inside each pilot house, some 30 feet above the water line, were the boats’ owners—industrialist Cornelius Vanderbilt and George Law—two immense egos who had decided to race 66 miles race upriver to Sing Sing. The gleaming tk-foot-long Cornelius Vanderbilt.

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The Cincinnati Observatory
Society: AIAA Main Category: Aerospace & Aviation Sub Category: Astronomy Era: 1840-1849 DateCreated: 1842 3489 Observatory Pl Cincinnati State: OH Zip: Country: USA Website: https://www.aiaa.org/uploadedFiles/About-AIAA/Governance/GovernanceDocs/AnnualReports/AIAA_AnnualReport_2007-2008.pdf Creator:

The Cincinnati Observatory, “The Birthplace of American  Astronomy,” is the oldest professional observatory in the United States.  Ormsby MacKnight Mitchel, the “Father of American Astronomy,” founded the  observatory in 1842.  John Quincy Adams laid the cornerstone  for the observatory on Mt. Ida, later renamed Mt. Adams. The  original Merz und Mahler 11-inch refractor telescope was put into service  in 1845 and is still in use here today on Mount Lookout.

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Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Joe D. Good (CC BY-SA 4.0) Image Caption: Era_date_from:
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In February 1837, Treasury Secretary Levi Woodbury called for information from the “most intelligent sources” to help prepare a report to Congress on the propriety of establishing a “system of telegraphs” for the United States. Of the 18 responses he received, 17 assumed that the telegraph would be optical and its motive power human. The only respondent to envision a different operating force was Samuel F. B.

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Horseshoe Curve
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Rail Transportation Era: 1840-1849 DateCreated: 1847-1854 Horse Shoe Curve Park Altoona State: PA Zip: 16601 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/horseshoe-curve-pennsylvania-rr/ Creator: Consolidated Rail Corporation

One of the earliest and most impressive of America's great railroad engineering feats, the Horseshoe Curve was built as a means of overcoming a straight-line grade over the geological feature known as the Allegheny Escarpment or Allegheny front, which separates the ridge-and-valley section of Pennsylvania (on the east) from the Allegheny Front (on the west). Such a straight-line route would have made commercial railroad operations unfeasible from both and economic and technical standpoint.

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Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/US Geological Survey Image Caption: The Horseshoe Curve was built as a means of overcoming a straight-line grade over the geological feature known as the Allegheny Escarpment. Era_date_from: 1847
Dublin-Belfast Rail Link
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Rail Transportation Era: 1840-1849 DateCreated: 1842-1855 Dublin to Belfast State: Zip: Country: Ireland Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Dublin-Belfast-Rail-Link/ Creator:

The Dublin to Belfast Rail Link established a vital connection between the capitals of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. The line's most notable engineering feature was the 1,760-foot-long Boyne Bridge; it represented one of the earliest uses of calculated stresses, the first large-scale use of wrought iron latticed girders, and the first full scale test of continuous beams. Tests performed on the wrought iron columns and struts were published and provided invaluable information for engineers who would design similar structures in the future. 

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1996
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Henry Clark Image Caption: The Dublin to Belfast Rail Link established a vital connection between the capitals of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Era_date_from: 1842
Thames Tunnel
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Tunnels Era: 1840-1849 DateCreated: 1843 Beneath the Thames River London State: Zip: Country: UK Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Thames-Tunnel/ Creator: Brunel, Marc Isambard , Brunel, Isambard Kingdom

By the turn of the 19th century, London's streets were clogged with traffic. Over 3,700 passengers used the Thames River's main boat crossing each day, while wagons and carts were forced to cross via the London Bridge, two miles away. Building a bridge would further impede shipping on the already-crowded Thames; a tunnel was the obvious alternative.

The first attempt at a tunnel in the present location began in 1807. The excavation had proceeded only 1,000 feet-using traditional mining methods-when crews reached a layer of quicksand and were forced to stop.

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1991
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Annie Mole (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: Thames Tunnel Era_date_from: 1843
Tennessee State Capitol
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Buildings Era: 1840-1849 DateCreated: 1845-1877 Tennessee State Capitol Nashville State: TN Zip: 37219 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Tennessee-State-Capitol/ Creator: Strickland, William , Bogart, John

The Tennessee State Capitol, the first and only home of the Tennessee General Assembly, was designed by engineer and architect William Strickland. Since its construction, it has ably served, with little modification, as the seat of Tennessee's government.

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2003
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Ron Cogswell Image Caption: Tennessee State Capitol Era_date_from: 1845
Starrucca Viaduct
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1840-1849 DateCreated: 1848 Starrucca Creek Lanesboro State: PA Zip: 18847 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Starrucca-Viaduct/ Creator: Adams, Julius , Kirkwood, James

The Starrucca Viaduct of the Erie Railroad Company crosses Starrucca Creek in Lanesboro, Pennsylvania. It is one of the oldest and one of the longest railroad bridges in Pennsylvania. Its 18 slender, semicircular stone arches each span 50 feet and the structure rises 110 feet above the creek.

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1973
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Navin Rajagopalan (CC BY-SA 2.0) Image Caption: Starrucca Viaduct Era_date_from: 1848
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Duck Creek Aqueduct

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Starrucca Viaduct

The Starrucca Viaduct of the Erie Railroad Company crosses Starrucca Creek in Lanesboro, Pennsylvania. It is one of the oldest and one of the longest railroad bridges in Pennsylvania. Its 18 slender, semicircular stone arches each span 50 feet and the structure rises 110 feet above the creek.…

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Tennessee State Capitol

The Tennessee State Capitol, the first and only home of the Tennessee General Assembly, was designed by engineer and architect William Strickland. Since its construction, it has ably served, with little modification, as the seat of Tennessee's government.

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Thames Tunnel

By the turn of the 19th century, London's streets were clogged with traffic. Over 3,700 passengers used the Thames River's main boat crossing each day, while wagons and carts were forced to cross via the London Bridge, two miles away. Building a bridge would further impede shipping on the…

Read More
Dublin-Belfast Rail Link

The Dublin to Belfast Rail Link established a vital connection between the capitals of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. The line's most notable engineering feature was the 1,760-foot-long Boyne Bridge; it represented one of the earliest uses of calculated stresses, the first…

Read More
Horseshoe Curve

One of the earliest and most impressive of America's great railroad engineering feats, the Horseshoe Curve was built as a means of overcoming a straight-line grade over the geological feature known as the Allegheny Escarpment or Allegheny front, which separates the ridge-and-valley section of…

Read More
The Cincinnati Observatory

The Cincinnati Observatory, “The Birthplace of American  Astronomy,” is the oldest professional observatory in the United States.  Ormsby MacKnight Mitchel, the “Father of American Astronomy,” founded the  observatory in 1842.  John Quincy Adams laid the cornerstone  for the…

Read More
Workers digging an oil well by hand at Bibi-Eibat (Azerbaijan).

 

On July 14, 1848 in Baku, Azerbaijan, Major Alekseev supervised the completion of a 20+ meter well, reaching a small pocket of crude oil, thus establishing the world’s very first oil well. The process used was an archaic technique known as cable-tool drilling, employed for hundreds of…

Read More
Duck Creek Aqueduct Covered Bridge

Duck Creek Aqueduct is a rare surviving example of a covered timber aqueduct. It was one of several similar structures on the Whitewater Canal, which operated between the Whitewater Valley and the Ohio River from 1839 to 1865. After being displaced by the railroad, the canal supplied hydraulic…

Read More

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