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1840-1849

John Penn & Sons Oscillating Steam Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1841Aboard the paddle steamer DiesbarDresdenState: SaxonyZip: 01069Country: GermanyWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-245-john-penn---sons-oscillating-steam-engine-%2818Creator: John Penn & Sons

The oscillating steam engine, built by John Penn & Sons, is located aboard the famed paddle steamer Diesbar.  Diesbar is the second oldest of a fleet of nine paddle steamers in Dresden.  What makes the Diesbar unique is its coal fueled engine and single deck design.  The John Penn and Sons engine that runs the steamer is the oldest operational marine steam engine in the world.  It has been in operation for over 165 years. 

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Photo: Sächsische DampfschiffahrtImage Caption: John Penn & Sons Oscillating Steam EngineEra_date_from: 1841
Wheeling Suspension Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1848Ohio RiverWheelingState: WVZip: 26003Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Wheeling-Suspension-Bridge/Creator: Ellet, Charles

The Wheeling Suspension Bridge was the first bridge to span the Ohio River. It was initially completed in 1849, but destroyed by a tornado five years later. The bridge was rebuilt in 1856. The replacement bridge has the same general appearance of the original structure; the massive towers, anchorage housings, and island approach are all the original stone masonry.

YearAdded:
1968
Image Credit: Photo by Edwin S. Grosvenor (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Wheeling Suspension BridgeEra_date_from: 1848
Duck Creek Aqueduct
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1846Whitewater CanalMetamoraState: INZip: 47030Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Duck-Creek-Aqueduct/Creator: Hutchens, Charles

The significance of the 15-mile Whitewater Canal was not in its ability to create a profit, but rather its effect on the economic growth of the Whitewater River Valley, considered the gateway to the interior of Indiana. Before the canal, travel was challenging. Most waterways in Indiana were only navigable by canoe, and the alternative - horse and wagon - was difficult, slow and expensive.  

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Duck Creek AqueductEra_date_from: 1846
Delaware Aqueduct of the Delaware & Hudson Canal
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Bridges, Transportation, Water Supply & ControlEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1848Delaware RiverMinisink FordState: NYZip: 18435Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Roebling-s-Delaware-Aqueduct/Creator: Roebling, John

The Delaware Aqueduct provided an important transportation link between the Pennsylvania's coalmines and New York's booming industrial marketplace. It is the earliest surviving work of John A. Roebling, who designed the Brooklyn Bridge  30 years later. The cable anchorage system first used on this project was also used on the Brooklyn Bridge. The aqueduct is patterned after Roebling's design of the Pennsylvania Canal over the Allegheny River, and is the oldest metal strand cable suspension bridge still standing in the U.S.

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Doug Kerr (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Delaware Aqueduct of the Delaware & Hudson CanalEra_date_from: 1848
Cruquius Pumping Station
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1849Cruquiusdijk 27
HaarlemmermeerCountry: NetherlandsWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-153-cruquius-pumping-station-%281849%29Creator: Cruquius, Nicolaus Samuel , Beijerinck, Jan Anne

This is one of three nearly identical pumping stations that drained the Haarlemmermeer (Haarlem Lake), 1849- 52, then continued to maintain the polder's water table for more than 80 years. The Haarlemmermeer area covers 45,000 acres (about 70 square miles) in a triangular region between the cities of Amsterdam, Haarlem, and Leiden.

YearAdded:
1991
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Mirko Junge (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Cruquius Pumping StationEra_date_from: 1849
Croton Water Supply System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1842Croton RiverNew YorkState: NYCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/croton-water-supply-systems/Creator: Jervis, John

Inferior water and the lack of a sufficient water supply prompted public pressure to find a significant water source for the 360,000 of people living in New York City at the time. Studies determined that the Croton River, 40 miles north of the city, was the best available source. The original system served as a prototype for large-scale water supply projects across America. 

YearAdded:
1975
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Otterman56 (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Croton Water Supply SystemEra_date_from: 1842
Conwy Tubular Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Bridges, Roads & RailsEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1849River ConwyState: North WhalesCountry: UKWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Conwy-Tubular-Bridge/Creator: Stephenson, Robert

Built by Robert Stephenson to carry the Chester and Holyhead Railway across the River Conwy, this bridge was erected between 1846 and 1848. It consists of a single span 400 feet long, formed by two parallel rectangular wrought iron tubes, each weighing 1300 tons. Masonry towers were built on the abutments and topped with battlements and turrets to harmonize with the nearby Conwy Castle. The Conwy Tubular Bridge was the first railway bridge in which trains ran through the main girders. It represents a pioneering use of wrought iron for bridges.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Original Photo: Flickr/Glenn J. MasonImage Caption: Conwy Tubular BridgeEra_date_from: 1849
Baltimore & Ohio Roundhouse & Shop Complex
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: between 1842 and the229 E Martin StreetMartinsburgState: WVZip: 25401Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/baltimore---ohio-railroad-roundhouse---shop-complex/Creator: Fink, Albert, Latrobe, Benjamin

"The roundhouse is an amazing survivor of an important era in American engineering and architectural history. Eric DeLony, chief of the National Park Service's Historic American Engineering Record, has called it 'the most important surviving cast-iron framed building in North America.'"   
From: The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Martinsburg Shop Complex: Historic Structure Report. By John P. Hankey, August, 2000.

YearAdded:
2001
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Roger Wollstadt (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Baltimore & Ohio (B&O) Roundhouse, built 1851.Era_date_from: between 1842 and the
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