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Suspension

Williamsburg Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1903Williamsburg BridgeBrooklynState: NYZip: 11211Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Williamsburg-Bridge/Creator: Buck, Leffert , Lindenthal, Gustav

When opened in 1903, the 1,600 foot long main span of the Williamsburg Bridge was the world's longest suspension span, surpassing the nearby Brooklyn Bridge by only 4.5 feet. The Williamsburg Bridge remained the world's longest suspension bridge span for 21 years until the opening of the Bear Mountain Bridge in 1924. The Williamsburg Bridge has two unsuspended side spans of 596.5 feet, each supported from below by trussed towers, giving the bridge an overall length of 2,793 feet. The four main suspension cables are 18.75 inches in diameter and each composed of over 10,000 wires.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Kev Gilmour (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Williamsburg BridgeEra_date_from: 1903
keeseville
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1878AuSable RiverKeesevilleState: NYCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/bridges-of-keeseville/Creator: Townsend, Soloman , Berlin Iron Bridge Company

A 214-foot single-span covered wooden bridge, built above the cribs of stone in the AuSable River that served to break log jams and ice floes, collapsed during the winter of 1875 under the weight of a three-foot snowfall and high winds. The "Upper Bridge" (pictured) was built in its place.

YearAdded:
1987
Image Credit: Public Domain (Released by Creator)Image Caption: The Keeseville Suspension Bridge built 1888, Keeseville, one of the three "Bridges of Keeseville" that span the AuSable RiverEra_date_from: 1878
Delaware Aqueduct of the Delaware & Hudson Canal
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Bridges, Transportation, Water Supply & ControlEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1848Delaware RiverMinisink FordState: NYZip: 18435Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Roebling-s-Delaware-Aqueduct/Creator: Roebling, John

The Delaware Aqueduct provided an important transportation link between the Pennsylvania's coalmines and New York's booming industrial marketplace. It is the earliest surviving work of John A. Roebling, who designed the Brooklyn Bridge  30 years later. The cable anchorage system first used on this project was also used on the Brooklyn Bridge. The aqueduct is patterned after Roebling's design of the Pennsylvania Canal over the Allegheny River, and is the oldest metal strand cable suspension bridge still standing in the U.S.

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Doug Kerr (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Delaware Aqueduct of the Delaware & Hudson CanalEra_date_from: 1848
Brooklyn Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1883East RiverBrooklynState: NYZip: 11201Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Brooklyn-Bridge/Creator: Roebling, John, Roebling, Washington

On May 24, 1883, with schools and businesses closed for the occasion, New York celebrated the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge. Also known as the Great East River Bridge, it was built over 14 years in the face of enormous difficulties. Deaths, fire in the Brooklyn caisson, and a scandal over inferior materials all added to the turmoil. The bridge is one of the most well-recognized symbols of American engineering, and remains the unofficial Eighth Wonder of the World.

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Sarah Ackerman (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: The Brooklyn Bridge earned its title of (unofficial) Eight Wonder of the World through its incredible size and beautyEra_date_from: 1883
Bidwell Bar Suspension Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1856Feather RiverOrovilleState: CAZip: 95966Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/Bidwell-Bar-Suspension-Bridge/Creator: Jones and Murray

Soon after gold was discovered at Sutter's Mill near Sacramento in 1848, General John Bidwell found gold near the Middle Fork of the Feather River. His discovery brought hordes of miners to the scene and Bidwell Bar was born. The Bidwell Bar Suspension Bridge over the Feather River was one of several suspension bridges built in the region in the 1850s, and is the only one that remains.

 

YearAdded:
1967
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: The original Bidwell Bar Suspension Bridge (1856), crossing over the Feather RiverEra_date_from: 1856
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