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Bridge

Lacey V. Murrow Bridge and Mount Baker Ridge Tunnels
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1940-1949 DateCreated: 1940 King County State: WA Zip: 98040 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Lacey-V--Murrow-Bridge-and-Mount-Baker-Ridge-Tunnels/ Creator: Murrow, Lacey V., Hadley, Homer

The 1.5 mile Lacey V. Murrow Bridge was the largest floating structure in the world and the first to be built of reinforced concrete when completed in 1940.  The bridge consisted of typically 300-foot long pontoons floated to site and rigidly connected to form a continuous structure and incorporated a unique floating concrete draw-span to allow for passage of marine traffic.  The original floating structure, constructed by Pontoon Bridge Builders, was accidentally sunk in 1990 during a major renovation effort and was replaced by 1993.

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Walter Siegmund Image Caption: The bridge and tunnel project were key in improving eastern access to Seattle, a major commercial port on the eastern rim of the Pacific Ocean. Era_date_from: 1940
Ironbridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1750-1799 DateCreated: 1779 Coalbrookdale-Ironbridge State: Zip: TF8 7AL Country: UK Website: http://www.asce.org/project/iron-bridge/ Creator: Darby III, Abraham

This bridge is recognized as the first iron bridge in the world. This rural region of England was an important industrial area thanks to coal deposits near the surface. In 1776 the nearest bridge that enabled people and goods to pass over the River Severn was two miles away at Buildwas. There was a ferry crossing, but the trip was difficult and dangerous especially in winter. In 1776, an Act to build a bridge to remedy this situation received Royal Assent.

YearAdded:
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Jasonjsmith Image Caption: This bridge is recognized as the first iron bridge in the world. Era_date_from: 1779
Williamsburg Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1900-1909 DateCreated: 1903 Williamsburg Bridge Brooklyn State: NY Zip: 11211 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Williamsburg-Bridge/ Creator: Buck, Leffert , Lindenthal, Gustav

When opened in 1903, the 1,600 foot long main span of the Williamsburg Bridge was the world's longest suspension span, surpassing the nearby Brooklyn Bridge by only 4.5 feet. The Williamsburg Bridge remained the world's longest suspension bridge span for 21 years until the opening of the Bear Mountain Bridge in 1924. The Williamsburg Bridge has two unsuspended side spans of 596.5 feet, each supported from below by trussed towers, giving the bridge an overall length of 2,793 feet. The four main suspension cables are 18.75 inches in diameter and each composed of over 10,000 wires.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Kev Gilmour (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: Williamsburg Bridge Era_date_from: 1903
Bollman Truss Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges, Transportation Era: 1860-1869 DateCreated: 1869 Little Patuxent River Savage State: MD Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Bollman-Truss-Bridge/ Creator: Bollman, Wendel

The design of the Bollman Truss Bridge-patented in 1852 and one of the first to use iron exclusively in all essential structural elements-was critical in the rapid expansion of American railroads in the 19th century. Replacing wooden bridges, which  were cumbersome to build and vulnerable to decay, the Bollman Truss Bridge could be built relatively quickly and inexpensively, while providing the long-lasting qualities associated with metal. This allowed new rail lines to be built over long distances in a short period of time.

YearAdded:
1966
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Andrew Bossi (CC BY-SA 2.0) Image Caption: Bollman Truss Bridge as it looks today, after the repairs done in 1934-84. Era_date_from: 1869
Alvord Lake Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1880-1889 DateCreated: 1889 San Francisco State: CA Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/alvord-lake-bridge/ Creator: Ransome, Ernest

Alvord Lake Bridge, along with many of Ernest Ransome's reinforced concrete buildings, survived the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and several subsequent tremblers with no damage. Built in 1889 by Ernest L Ransome of New York, this reinforced concrete arch bridge in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park is believed to be the oldest concrete bridge in the United States that used steel reinforcing bars to improve the behavior of the concrete. The reinforcement consists of a series of square cold-twisted steel reinforcing bars, an invention of Ransome.

YearAdded:
1969
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service) Image Caption: Alvord Lake Bridge Era_date_from: 1889
Quebec Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1910-1919 DateCreated: 1917 Quebec Bridge Quebec City State: Quebec Zip: G1K 4J9 Country: Canada Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Quebec-Bridge/ Creator: McLure, Norman , Cooper, Theodore

The bridge is immense, not only in length and weight but in width. At 67 feet wide, it can accommodate two sets of railway tracks, two sets of streetcar tracks and two roadways.

It took three tries and cost 89 lives, but the city of Quebec was determined to compete with provincial rival Montreal for commercial rail traffic in the late 19th century. The solution was a rail bridge across the St. Lawrence River requiring a single cantilever span 1,800 feet long - the longest ever attempted. 

YearAdded:
1987
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Sebastien Savard (CC BY-SA 2.5) Image Caption: Quebec Bridge Era_date_from: 1917
Zhaozhou (or Anji) Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 0-1000 DateCreated: 605 AD Xiao River Zhaoxian State: Hebei Zip: Country: China Website: http://www.asce.org/project/zhaozhou-bridge-(or-anji)/ Creator: Chun, Li

Ancient Chinese literature refers to the Zhaozhou Bridge as a "crescent moon rising from the clouds" or a "rainbow in the sky."  Throughout its history, it has been known as the Anchi or Anji Bridge (literally "safe crossing"), the Dashi Bridge ("big stone"), and the Dashiqiao ("great stone") Bridge.

YearAdded:
1989
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice) Image Caption: Zhaozhou (or Anji) Bridge Era_date_from: 605 AD
keeseville
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1870-1879 DateCreated: 1878 AuSable River Keeseville State: NY Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/bridges-of-keeseville/ Creator: Townsend, Soloman , Berlin Iron Bridge Company

A 214-foot single-span covered wooden bridge, built above the cribs of stone in the AuSable River that served to break log jams and ice floes, collapsed during the winter of 1875 under the weight of a three-foot snowfall and high winds. The "Upper Bridge" (pictured) was built in its place.

YearAdded:
1987
Image Credit: Public Domain (Released by Creator) Image Caption: The Keeseville Suspension Bridge built 1888, Keeseville, one of the three "Bridges of Keeseville" that span the AuSable River Era_date_from: 1878
Delaware Aqueduct of the Delaware & Hudson Canal
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges, Transportation, Water Supply & Control Era: 1840-1849 DateCreated: 1848 Delaware River Minisink Ford State: NY Zip: 18435 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Roebling-s-Delaware-Aqueduct/ Creator: Roebling, John

The Delaware Aqueduct provided an important transportation link between the Pennsylvania's coalmines and New York's booming industrial marketplace. It is the earliest surviving work of John A. Roebling, who designed the Brooklyn Bridge  30 years later. The cable anchorage system first used on this project was also used on the Brooklyn Bridge. The aqueduct is patterned after Roebling's design of the Pennsylvania Canal over the Allegheny River, and is the oldest metal strand cable suspension bridge still standing in the U.S.

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Doug Kerr (CC BY-SA 2.0) Image Caption: Delaware Aqueduct of the Delaware & Hudson Canal Era_date_from: 1848
Brooklyn Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1880-1889 DateCreated: 1883 East River Brooklyn State: NY Zip: 11201 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Brooklyn-Bridge/ Creator: Roebling, John, Roebling, Washington

On May 24, 1883, with schools and businesses closed for the occasion, New York celebrated the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge. Also known as the Great East River Bridge, it was built over 14 years in the face of enormous difficulties. Deaths, fire in the Brooklyn caisson, and a scandal over inferior materials all added to the turmoil. The bridge is one of the most well-recognized symbols of American engineering, and remains the unofficial Eighth Wonder of the World.

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Sarah Ackerman (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: The Brooklyn Bridge earned its title of (unofficial) Eight Wonder of the World through its incredible size and beauty Era_date_from: 1883
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Bailey Island Bridge

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Bayonne Bridge

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Bridgeport Covered Bridge

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Brooklyn Bridge

On May 24, 1883, with schools and businesses closed for the occasion, New York celebrated the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge. Also known as the Great East River Bridge, it was built over 14 years in the face of enormous difficulties. Deaths, fire in the Brooklyn caisson, and a scandal over…

Read More
Delaware Aqueduct of the Delaware & Hudson Canal

The Delaware Aqueduct provided an important transportation link between the Pennsylvania's coalmines and New York's booming industrial marketplace. It is the earliest surviving work of John A. Roebling, who designed the Brooklyn Bridge  30 years later. The cable anchorage system first used…

Read More
keeseville

A 214-foot single-span covered wooden bridge, built above the cribs of stone in the AuSable River that served to break log jams and ice floes, collapsed during the winter of 1875 under the weight of a three-foot snowfall and high winds. The "Upper Bridge" (pictured) was built in its place.…

Read More
Zhaozhou (or Anji) Bridge

Ancient Chinese literature refers to the Zhaozhou Bridge as a "crescent moon rising from the clouds" or a "rainbow in the sky."  Throughout its history, it has been known as the Anchi or Anji Bridge (literally "safe crossing"), the Dashi Bridge ("big stone"), and the Dashiqiao ("great stone")…

Read More
Quebec Bridge

The bridge is immense, not only in length and weight but in width. At 67 feet wide, it can accommodate two sets of railway tracks, two sets of streetcar tracks and two roadways.

It took three tries and cost 89 lives, but the city of Quebec was determined to compete with provincial rival…

Read More
Alvord Lake Bridge

Alvord Lake Bridge, along with many of Ernest Ransome's reinforced concrete buildings, survived the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and several subsequent tremblers with no damage. Built in 1889 by Ernest L Ransome of New York, this reinforced concrete arch bridge in San Francisco's Golden Gate…

Read More
Bollman Truss Bridge

The design of the Bollman Truss Bridge-patented in 1852 and one of the first to use iron exclusively in all essential structural elements-was critical in the rapid expansion of American railroads in the 19th century. Replacing wooden bridges, which  were cumbersome to build and vulnerable to…

Read More
Williamsburg Bridge

When opened in 1903, the 1,600 foot long main span of the Williamsburg Bridge was the world's longest suspension span, surpassing the nearby Brooklyn Bridge by only 4.5 feet. The Williamsburg Bridge remained the world's longest suspension bridge span for 21 years until the opening of the Bear…

Read More
Ironbridge

This bridge is recognized as the first iron bridge in the world. This rural region of England was an important industrial area thanks to coal deposits near the surface. In 1776 the nearest bridge that enabled people and goods to pass over the River Severn was two miles away at Buildwas. There…

Read More
Lacey V. Murrow Bridge and Mount Baker Ridge Tunnels

The 1.5 mile Lacey V. Murrow Bridge was the largest floating structure in the world and the first to be built of reinforced concrete when completed in 1940.  The bridge consisted of typically 300-foot long pontoons floated to site and rigidly connected to form a continuous structure and…

Read More

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