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Texas Commerce Bank Building
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1929JP Morgan Chase BuildingHoustonState: TXZip: 77002Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/texas-commerce-bank-building/Creator: Simpson, William E.

The tower was designed to rest on a continuous reinforced concrete mat, 4 feet thick, with the base of the slab 24 feet below street level.

What makes the Texas Commerce Bank Building revolutionary in the civil engineering world is not so much the building itself, but its foundation.  Initial studies for the type of foundation to be used began in the fall of 1927.  William E. Simpson, the building's chief structural engineer, suggested using a mat foundation, something new for Houston's multistory buildings.

YearAdded:
1997
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Reagan Rothenberger Image Caption: The Texas Commerce Bank Building, now called the JP Morgan Chase Building, had a reinforced concrete mat foundation that was revolutionary at the time.Era_date_from: 1929
Brooklyn Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1883East RiverBrooklynState: NYZip: 11201Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Brooklyn-Bridge/Creator: Roebling, John, Roebling, Washington

On May 24, 1883, with schools and businesses closed for the occasion, New York celebrated the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge. Also known as the Great East River Bridge, it was built over 14 years in the face of enormous difficulties. Deaths, fire in the Brooklyn caisson, and a scandal over inferior materials all added to the turmoil. The bridge is one of the most well-recognized symbols of American engineering, and remains the unofficial Eighth Wonder of the World.

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Sarah Ackerman (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: The Brooklyn Bridge earned its title of (unofficial) Eight Wonder of the World through its incredible size and beautyEra_date_from: 1883
Bayonne Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Bridges, TransportationEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1931Kill Van Kull tidal straitStaten IslandState: NYZip: 10302Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Bayonne-Bridge/Creator: Ammann, Othmar

The longest steel-arch bridge in the world for 46 years, the Bayonne Bridge continues to be celebrated today as a major aesthetic and technical achievement. The 1,675-foot bridge replaced a ferry service which until then was the only means of crossing from  the Bayonne peninsula to Staten Island. While providing this essential link in the transportation network of greater New York City, the bridge's mid-span clearance of 150 feet also allows for unobstructed navigation on Newark Bay, the main shipping channel to the inland ports of Newark and Elizabeth, New Jersey.

YearAdded:
1985
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Raymond Bucko (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: The graceful Bayonne Bridge was the longest steel-arch bridge in the world for 46 years.Era_date_from: 1931
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 19551491 W. JeffersonTrentonState: MIZip: 48183Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/minerals-extraction-and-refining/-104-basic-oxygen-steel-making-vessel-%281955%29, http://files.asme.org/ASMEORG/Communities/History/Landmarks/5498.pdfCreator: McLouth, Donald
This is one of the three original 60-ton vessels by which the basic oxygen process (BOP) of steel making was introduced into this country from Austria, where it was invented. It heralded the first new technology in fifty years to become the basis of a major process for steel production throughout the world. In this process, a water-cooled lance injected a jet of high-purity oxygen into the bath of molten iron. Various chemical reactions produced a quality low-nitrogen steel at a ton-per-hour rate nearly three times that of the open hearth furnace.
YearAdded:
1985
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Basic-Oxygen Steel Making VesselEra_date_from: 1955
Atlantic City Convention Hall
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1926-19292301 BoardwalkAtlantic CityState: NJZip: 08401Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/atlantic-city-municipal-convention-center/Creator: Lockwood-Greene & Co.

The quantities of materials used in the building are staggering: 12,000 tons of structural steel; 42,000 cubic yards of concrete - consisting of 65,000 barrels of cement and 25,000 tons of sand; 360,000 feet of piling; and 10,000,000 bricks. At the time of its construction, Atlantic City Municipal Convention Hall was believed to be the world's largest hall, capable of seating 40,000 people. It continues to serve as a meeting place for shows, pageants, sporting events, and conventions. It is a structure of heroic proportions.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Paul Lowry (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: The Atlantic City Convention Hall maintains its magnificence even as it approaches 90 years of age.Era_date_from: 1926
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