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1983

Ohio Canal System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1825N/AState: OHCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Ohio-Canal-System/Creator: Ohio, State of

Between 1825 and 1847 the State of Ohio constructed 1,000 miles of canals and feeder canals, 33,000 acres of reservoir surface area, 29 dams across streams, 294 lift locks, 44 aqueducts and many smaller structures at a cost of about 16 million dollars. The network of navigable canals provided a system of economical transportation where none had previously existed; the young state, with its isolated frontier lifestyle, was transformed almost overnight into a thriving segment of the nation's economy.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy WikipediaImage Caption: A part of the Ohio Canal System in 1902.Era_date_from: 1825
Xerography
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Communications and Data ProcessingEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1948Battelle Memorial InstituteColumbusState: OHZip: 43201-2693Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/communications-and-data-processing/-88-xerography-%281948%29-, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/540c9932-b7e2-4884-8060-de35b8146064/88-Xerography.aspxCreator: Carlson, Chester

The convenient dry-copying process for printed pages is among the truly revolutionary inventions of the century. In 1937 Chester Carlson, a New York patent attorney, developed the concept of applying an electrostatic charge on a plate coated with a photoconductive material. On November 22, 1938, Carlson dusted powder dyed with evergreen spores across an exposed plate and transferred the imprint to the surface of a paper.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy Xerox CorporationImage Caption: XerographyEra_date_from: 1948
Sault Ste. Marie Hydroelectric Complex
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Power GenerationEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1902Salmon Run WaySault Ste. MarieState: MIZip: 49783Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/sault-ste--marie-hydroelectric-power-complex/Creator: Modjeski, Ralph , Noble, Alfred

Located at the northern tip of Michigan where Lake Superior, Lake Michigan, and Lake Huron join together, the Sault Ste. Marie Hydroelectric Power Complex was built to harness the hydroelectric potential of the  20-foot falls at the headwaters of the St. Marys (sic) River, the sole outlet of Lake Superior. A century after its construction, the  plant remains the largest low-head hydroelectric facility in the United States. Today, the Sault Ste. Marie plant supplies electricity to area residents, especially those in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Madison Berndt (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Sault Ste. Marie Hydroelectric ComplexEra_date_from: 1902
Manufacturer’s identification plaque
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895Reed Gold Mine Historic SiteMidlandState: NCZip: 28107Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/minerals-extraction-and-refining/-84-reed-gold-mine-ten-stamp-mill-%281895%29Creator: Mecklenburg Iron Works

The first authenticated discovery of gold in the U.S. occurred on the Cabarrus County farm of John Reed in 1799, sparking the nation's first gold rush. During its peak years, more than a million dollars of gold was recovered a year, making North Carolina a leader in gold production until 1848. This mill, built by the Mecklenburg Iron Works of Charlotte, North Carolina, is original except for the timber work. Two groups of five 750-pound stamps with 5- to 7-inch lift, rose and fell thirty-five times a minute to yield a finely crushed ore.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Caption: Manufacturer’s identification plaqueEra_date_from: 1895
Reed Gold Mine Ten-Stamp Mill
Society: SME (mining)Main Category: MiningSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895Reed Gold Mine Historic SiteMidlandState: NCZip: 28107Country: USAWebsite: http://www.smenet.org/Creator: Mecklenburg Iron Works

The first authenticated discovery of gold in the U.S. occurred on the Cabarrus County farm of John Reed in 1799, sparking the nation's first gold rush. During its peak years, more than a million dollars of gold was recovered a year, making North Carolina a leader in gold production until 1848. This mill, built by the Mecklenburg Iron Works of Charlotte, North Carolina, is original except for the timber work. Two groups of five 750-pound stamps with 5- to 7-inch lift, rose and fell thirty-five times a minute to yield a finely crushed ore.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Photo Courtesy of North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.Image Caption: The Stamp Mill at the Reed Gold Mine in Midland, NC.Era_date_from: 1895
Peavey-Haglin Concrete Grain Elevator
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 19005505 Minnesota 7 Service RdSt. Louis ParkState: MNZip: 55416Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/peavy-haglin-concrete-grain-elevator/Creator: Peavy, Frank , Haglin, Charles

No image dominates the Midwestern landscape like the monolithic grain elevator, whose present shape and construction owe much to grain company operator Frank Peavy and architect-builder Charles Haglin.

Wanting to improve on the flammability and cost of traditional wood-cribbed construction, Peavy speculated that reinforced concrete, in its infancy at the turn of the century, would outperform other materials. But critics feared that the elevator would collapse due to the vacuum created when grain was emptied from the air-tight structure.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Original Uploader was Elkman (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Peavey-Haglin Concrete Grain ElevatorEra_date_from: 1900
NS Savannah
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 19624601 Newgate AveBaltimoreState: MDZip: 21224Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/87-ns-savannahCreator: New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Babcock & Wilcox Company

The N.S. Savannah was the first nuclear-powered cargo-passenger ship, built by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation at Camden, New Jersey. The 74 maximum-power thermal megawatt pressurized-water reactor was supplied by the Babcock & Wilcox Company. Nearly 600 feet long with 22,000-tons displacement, the ship at top speed surged along at 24 knots, with more than 22,300 shaft horsepower to a single propeller. A joint venture by the U.S. Maritime Administration and the Atomic Energy Commission to the design of George G. Sharp Inc.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Public Domain (U.S. Government)Image Caption: NS SavannahEra_date_from: 1962
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Food ProcessingEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1947FMC Corporation (Item no longer exists)LakelandState: FLZip: 33801Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/food-processing/-82-fmc-citrus-juice-extractor-%281947%29---Creator: FMC Corporation, Sunkist Corporation
Squeezing an orange for juice is part of the concept of this machine, only on a much larger scale. The extractor revolutionized the juice industry. The twenty-four head rotary action simultaneously extracts juice from the interior of the fruit and citrus oil from the peel surface. The first unit was operated experimentally on grapefruit at the Sunkist Exchange plant in Tempe, Arizona, during late May of 1946. Tests on citrus fruits continued in California, Texas, and Florida.
YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: FMC Citrus Juice ExtractorEra_date_from: 1947
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1926The Henry Ford MuseumDearbornState: MIZip: 48124Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/-81-corning-ribbon-machine-%281926%29Creator: Woods, William , Corning Glass Works
While Thomas Edison perfected the first practical and durable filament in 1879, it was not until much later that electricity left the laboratory to become the universal source of light. This required a tremendous number of glass envelopes for light bulbs. In the 1890s the top speed of the finest glass-blowing team produced two bulbs a minute.
YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Original Image: Courtesy Flickr/ellenm1 (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Corning Ribbon MachineEra_date_from: 1926
Blenheim Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1855Schoharie Creek (No longer)GilboaState: NYZip: 12076Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/Blenheim-Bridge/Creator: Powers, Nichols Montgomery , Blenheim Bridge Company

Nicholas Montgomery Powers built the bridge. It was first constructed behind the village, then taken apart and reassembled over the stream. Some residents questioned the idea of re-constructing it, but Powers was so confident of the bridge's durability that he sat on the roof when the final trestles supporting it were removed. From his perch he reportedly said: "If the bridge goes down, I never want to see the sun rise again!"

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Doug Kerr (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The view entering the Blenheim Bridge, before it was destroyed.Era_date_from: 1855
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