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Ohio

Point of Beginning, U.S. Public Lands
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Boundaries & SurveysEra: 1750-1799DateCreated: 1785East LiverpoolState: OHZip: 43920Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Point-of-Beginning,-U-S--Public-Lands/Creator: Hutchins, Thomas

The "Land Ordinance of 1785" required that U.S. lands in the public domain be surveyed before sale, and that the surveys be made in accordance with a consistent, integrated system of lines grid-oriented to a true meridian (north-south reference line) and base line (east-west reference line), subdividing the land into approximately square parcels, called townships.  

Thomas Hutchins, the first Geographer of the United States, drove his stake near East Liverpool, Ohio to mark the Point of Beginning of the Geographer's Line, the first westward base line.

YearAdded:
1985
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Nyttend Image Caption: This monument marks the site that served as the basis for the entire Public Land Survey System — the system by which most of the United States, outside of the original colonies, was surveyed.Era_date_from: 1785
Ohio Canal System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1825N/AState: OHCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Ohio-Canal-System/Creator: Ohio, State of

Between 1825 and 1847 the State of Ohio constructed 1,000 miles of canals and feeder canals, 33,000 acres of reservoir surface area, 29 dams across streams, 294 lift locks, 44 aqueducts and many smaller structures at a cost of about 16 million dollars. The network of navigable canals provided a system of economical transportation where none had previously existed; the young state, with its isolated frontier lifestyle, was transformed almost overnight into a thriving segment of the nation's economy.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy WikipediaImage Caption: A part of the Ohio Canal System in 1902.Era_date_from: 1825
Louisville and Portland Canal Locks & Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1830LouisvilleState: KYZip: 40202Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Louisville-and-Portland-Canal-Locks---Dam/Creator: Louisville and Portland Canal Company

Chartered in 1825, the Louisville and Portland Canal Company was authorized to construct a canal around the rapids called the "Falls of the Ohio." Construction started on March 1, 1826. The canal and first generation of locks were completed in 1830. As originally constructed, the canal was 1.9 miles long, 64 feet wide, and terminated at its lower end with a three-flight lock system with a total lift of 26 feet. Each lock chamber was 198 feet long between miter posts, with available length for vessels of 183 feet, width of 52 feet, and a lift at low stages of 8.5 feet.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: public domainImage Caption: The Louisville and Portland Canal was completed in 1830.Era_date_from: 1830
Baltimore & Ohio Roundhouse & Shop Complex
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: between 1842 and the229 E Martin StreetMartinsburgState: WVZip: 25401Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/baltimore---ohio-railroad-roundhouse---shop-complex/Creator: Fink, Albert, Latrobe, Benjamin

"The roundhouse is an amazing survivor of an important era in American engineering and architectural history. Eric DeLony, chief of the National Park Service's Historic American Engineering Record, has called it 'the most important surviving cast-iron framed building in North America.'"   
From: The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Martinsburg Shop Complex: Historic Structure Report. By John P. Hankey, August, 2000.

YearAdded:
2001
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Roger Wollstadt (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Baltimore & Ohio (B&O) Roundhouse, built 1851.Era_date_from: between 1842 and the
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