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1926

Rubber Tractor Tires
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: VehiclesEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1926Orange County Historical SocietyOrangeState: VAZip: 22960Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/rubber-tractor-tires-34.aspxCreator: Pounds, Hoyle, Allis-Chalmers Company, Roorda, Hessel

Early tractors were massive and expensive. Their steel lug wheels gave poor traction and a rough ride. Lugs were prohibited on many roads. 1926 Hoyle Pounds modified a Fordson tractor with zero pressure truck tires on special rims to improve performance on sandy soils in Winter Garden, FL.

A successful business resulted. In 1929 Hessel Roorda equipped Farmall tractors with low pressure rubber tires to pick corn in muddy fields near Rock Valley, IA. Farmers found they performed well in all conditions.

YearAdded:
1995
Image Caption: A modern rubber tractor tire
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1926Agricultural Engineering Building AE - Building 298ColumbusState: OHZip: 43210Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/ives-hall-1.aspx

In 1926, Ives Hall, the original Agricultural Engineering Building at The Ohio State University, Columbus, was designated as ASAE's first engineering landmark in honor of department founder and 18th president of ASAE Fredrick Walter Ives. Frederick W. Ives 1884 - 1924.

Ives Hall was on the corner of Neil and Woodruff Avenues from 1926 - 2002. This display has been constructed with brick from the original structure.

 Dr. Robert H. Goddard and a liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket at Auburn, Massachusetts.
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 192620 Upland StreetAuburnState: MACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/uploadedFiles/Education_and_Careers/STEM_K-12_Outreach/Kids_Place/Rockets_Activities/Pop%20Rockets%20Activity%5B1%5D.pdfCreator: Goddard, Dr. Robert H.

On March 16, 1926 Dr. Robert H. Goddard, also known as "the father of modern rocketry," launched the world’s first liquid propellant rocket from a point 1000 feet S.S.E. of the plaque on the property of the Asa M. Ward Family.  Erected by the American Rocket Society July 13, 1960 in recognition of this significant achievement in the evolution of astronautics.

YearAdded:
2000
Image Caption: Dr. Robert H. Goddard and a liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket at Auburn, Massachusetts
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1926The Henry Ford MuseumDearbornState: MIZip: 48124Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/-81-corning-ribbon-machine-%281926%29Creator: Woods, William , Corning Glass Works
While Thomas Edison perfected the first practical and durable filament in 1879, it was not until much later that electricity left the laboratory to become the universal source of light. This required a tremendous number of glass envelopes for light bulbs. In the 1890s the top speed of the finest glass-blowing team produced two bulbs a minute.
YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Original Image: Courtesy Flickr/ellenm1 (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Corning Ribbon MachineEra_date_from: 1926
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