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Edison

First Central Station in South Carolina
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1882United States Electric Illuminating CompanyCharlestonState: SCZip: 29401Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Central_Station_in_South_Carolina,_1882Creator: Maxim, Hiram

The United States Electric Illuminating Company of Charleston started up South Carolina's first central station for incandescent lighting in October 1882 -- only one month after Thomas Edison opened his famous Pearl Street plant in New York City. In the following years, the company's parent firm was a major force in the growing electrical industry.

YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Courtesy IEEEImage Caption: The United States Electric Illuminating Company central station at 94 Queen Street.Era_date_from: 1882
Edison with his early phonograph
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Communications and Data ProcessingEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 187737 Honeysuckle AvenueWest OrangeState: NJZip: 07052Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/68-edison-experimental-recording-phonographCreator: Edison, Thomas

Edison's simple and unprecedented instrument allowed for the first time the permanent recording and reproduction of sound, especially the human voice. On December 6, 1877, Edison put tinfoil around the cylinder, turned the handle of the shaft and, shouting into one of the diaphragms, recorded a verse of Mary Had a Little Lamb "almost perfectly." From this machine evolved the phonographs and record industries of the world.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Caption: Edison with his early phonographEra_date_from: 1877
Edison 'Jumbo' Engine-Driver Dynamo
Society: ASMEMain Category: Electric, MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1882Henry Ford MuseumDearbornState: MIZip: 48124Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-steam/-48-edison--jumbo--engine-driver-dynamo-%281882%29Creator: Edison, Thomas

This dynamo, connected directly to a high-speed steam engine, was one of six that produced direct current at Thomas A. Edison's electric power station at 257 Pearl Street in New York City. The Pearl Street Station was the prototype for central station power generation. Edison set out in 1878 to provide an electrical distribution system to bring lighting into the home: His first filament lamp lit on October 21, 1879. With the help of Frances Upton and C.L. Clarke, Edison built his engine-driven dynamo for the 1881 Paris Electrical Exposition.

YearAdded:
1980
Image Caption: Edison jumbo dynamoEra_date_from: 1882
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1926The Henry Ford MuseumDearbornState: MIZip: 48124Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/-81-corning-ribbon-machine-%281926%29Creator: Woods, William , Corning Glass Works
While Thomas Edison perfected the first practical and durable filament in 1879, it was not until much later that electricity left the laboratory to become the universal source of light. This required a tremendous number of glass envelopes for light bulbs. In the 1890s the top speed of the finest glass-blowing team produced two bulbs a minute.
YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Original Image: Courtesy Flickr/ellenm1 (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Corning Ribbon MachineEra_date_from: 1926
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